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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Essa EL. 2014. Introduction to early childhood education: Annotated Instructor's edition (7th ed.). Albany, NY: Delmar Learning, 542 pp.

Annotation: This annotated instructor's version of a college textbook presents research-based information on early brain development, emergent curricula, and early childhood programming in developmentally appropriate practice. The book includes a built-in instructor's manual as well as notes in the margins about class discussion, activities, assignments, films, and lectures. Each chapter also includes answers to five key questions that appear in the corresponding student textbook. Ideas for major projects or assignment are provided. The book is divided into six main parts, each of which focuses on a different aspect of early childhood education: the what, who, why, where, how (curriculum) and how (guidance) of early childhood education. Also included are an epilogue, references, a glossary, name and subject indexes, and a preface.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7668-3451-4.

Keywords: Curricula, Early childhood education, Early childhood educators, Families, Parents, Programs, Research Early childhood development, Textbooks

Wilson LB, Taba S. 2011. Brighten baby's world. Honolulu, HI: Same Small Boat Productions, 1 DVD (8 min., 30 sec.).

Annotation: This video for trainers, administrators, and educators in early childhood programs in Hawaii is designed to increase awareness and understanding of positive attachment and social connections in the context of postpartum depression.

Contact: Same Small Boat Productions, 1050 Bishop Street, Suite 436, Honolulu, HI 96813, Telephone: (808) 384-2902 E-mail: info@samesmallboat.com Contact E-mail: lbwilson@webfishpacific.com Web Site: http://samesmallboat.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Attachment behavior, DVDs, Early childhood educators, Emotional development, Hawaii, Health promotion, Infant health, Parenting, Postpartum depression, Psychosocial development, State programs, Training, Training, Vulnerability

Aronson S, Donoghue E, Shope T, eds. 2010. Curriculum for managing infectious diseases in early education and child care settings. Chicago, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, (Healthy Futures)

Annotation: This curriculum comprises an instructor's manual and a participant's manual on understanding, preventing, recognizing, and managing infectious diseases in early education and child care settings. The curriculum is designed as an educational tool for early childhood educators and child care workers with all levels of understanding about infectious diseases. Each manual is divided into three modules and includes PowerPoint presentations, video clips, activities, forms, and pre- and post-tests, and other resources. Tips for presenting and instructions for downloading and saving files for presenting without internet access are available from the website.

Contact: Healthy Child Care America, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (888) 227-5409 Fax: (847) 228-7320 E-mail: childcare@aap.org Web Site: http://www.healthychildcare.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care workers, Child health, Curricula, Disease prevention, Early childhood educators, Infectious diseases, Resources for professionals

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2009. Medication administration in early education and child care settings. Elk Grove, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2 v.

Annotation: This curriculum provides information about medication administration for early education and child care professionals. Contents include an instructor's manual and a participant's manual. The curriculum is divided into 5 modules and includes presentations, video clips, activities, forms, and pre- and post-tests. Topics include forms of medication; preparation and medication storage; how to administer oral medication, topical medication, eye drops, and ear drops; documentation; and problem solving, The curriculum is estimated to take 4 hours to present, however, it can be adapted to meet time constraints and learner and instructor needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Child care workers, Child safety, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Medications

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Yamashita L, Ambrose A. 1998. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: A manual for pediatric residents. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 165 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Contact Phone: (808) 536-7702 Ext. 2224 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Ambrose A. 1997. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: Facilitator's manual (Draft). Honolulu, HI: Health and Education Collaboration Project, Hawaii Medical Association, 157 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Out of print.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Young ME. 1996. Early child development: Investing in the future. Washington, DC: World Bank, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 102 pp. (Directions in development)

Annotation: This book presents an overview of many international programs undertaken to improve the life of children, particularly from birth to eight years of age. Part 1 focuses on describing the theory behind early childhood education and includes sections on the case for early intervention, approaches to the development of young children, and paying for child development programs. Part 2 discusses the practice of early childhood education and includes sections on educating parents, training caregivers, delivering services to children, reforming formal education systems to include preschoolers, and educating throughout the mass media. Case studies presented are from from Israel, Turkey, Mexico, Trinidad and Tobago, the former East Bloc, Kenya, United States, India, Kazakstan, Guyana, Philippines, Chile, El Salvador, Venezuela, Bolivia, and Nigeria. Boxes and tables illustrate cases and highlight information throughout the book. A bibliography completes the book.

Contact: World Bank, 1818 H Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20433, Telephone: (202) 477-1000 Fax: (202) 477-6391 E-mail: books@worldbank.org Web Site: http://www.worldbank.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8213-3547-2.

Keywords: Caregivers, Case studies, Child health, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early childhood educators, Early intervention, Financing, International health, Mass media, Parents, Program descriptions, Reform, Service delivery

Ford K, Liberante K. [1990]. Health and safety consulting needs survey. Tucson and Phoenix, AZ: Pima County Health Department and Maricopa County Public Health Services, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the findings of a health and safety needs consulting survey conducted as part of a broad two-county initiative in Arizona to identify curriculum and training needs for child care staff. The analysis of survey results, conducted in 1989, contributed to the report's recommendations for the public health community, including: the establishment of baseline data regarding health and safety risks in local child care programs; the development of resources and trainers to upgrade the knowledge and skills of child care staff and reduce identified health and safety risks; the provision of health and safety consultation services to early childhood programs; networking with other agencies who enter child care programs for regulatory or consultation purposes; and participation in public advisory boards and/or legislative committees having to do with child care policy and programs.

Contact: Pima County Health Department, 3950 S. Country Club Road, Suite 100, Tucson, AZ 85714, Telephone: (520) 243-7770 Web Site: http://www.pimahealth.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Arizona, Child care, Child care centers, Child care workers, Early childhood educators, Health and safety, Needs assessment, Surveys, Training

McCarthy J. 1988. State certification of early childhood teachers: An analysis of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data collected in December 1987 and January 1988 through a telephone survey of state certification officials and early childhood specialists and from a review of documents provided by state certification offices and other information. It discusses the patterns of certification found and the implications of recent changes. Overall, teacher certification is found to be in a state of rapid change.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org $5.00 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Certification, Early childhood educators, State government

Fein G, Rivkin M, eds. 1986. The young child at play. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 230 pp. (Review of research; 4)

Annotation: The purpose of this volume is to give early childhood educators a source of information about contemporary research on children's play. Many of the chapters review studies of the development of play, stressing the intricate competencies that emerge as new play forms develop. Each author comments on the implications of the material covered for teachers. The concluding two chapters review the literature on factors in the preschool environment, indoors and outdoors, that govern the amount and quality of play.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Children, Early childhood educators, Literature reviews, Play

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.