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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (32 total).

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. 2015. Marijuana talk kit: What you need to know to talk with your teen about marijuana . New York, NY: Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 20 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help parents talk to adolescents about marijuana. Contents include facts about marijuana and why it is risky for adolescents, ways to talk with adolescents about marijuana including what to say and what not to say, how to respond to adolescents' questions and arguments, and resources to help.

Contact: Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 352 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (855) 378-4373 Secondary Telephone: (212) 922-1560 Fax: (212) 922-1570 E-mail: webmail@drugfree.org Web Site: http://www.drugfree.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Communication, Drug use behavior, Marijuana, Parents, Risk factors

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Drug use, illicit: Primary care interventions for children and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2012. Preventing tobacco use among youth and young adults: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 899 pp., exec. summ. (11 pp.).

Annotation: This report provides information about the scientific evidence on smoking among adolescents and young adults. Topics include research on diseases caused by early tobacco use, the addiction process, epidemiology, risk factors, the tobacco industry’s influence, and prevention. An executive summary, consumer booklet, fact sheet, parent and physician conversation cards, public service announcements, and promotional buttons and e-cards are also available. The consumer booklet and fact sheet are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Drug addiction, Epidemiology, Health behavior, Marketing, Prevention, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Statistical data, Tobacco use, Young adults

Sidransky D, Norman LA, McCarthy A, Taylor PL, eds. 2010. How tobacco smoke causes disease: The biology and behavioral basis for smoking-attributable disease. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 706 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the ways tobacco smoke damages organs in the body and causes disease and death. Topics include how and why smokers become addicted and how nicotine compares with heroin and cocaine in its hold on users and its effects on the brain. In addition, the report discusses how chemicals in cigarette smoke impair the immune system and why smokers are more likely to suffer from chronic disease than are nonsmokers. Companion booklets for consumers and clinicians and additional online resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Addictions, Biomechanics, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Drug use behavior, Smoking, Tobacco use

Eaton DK, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins Harris, WA, Lowery R, McManus T, Chyen D, Shanklin S, Lim C, Grunbaum J, Wechsler H. 2006. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-5):1-96,

Annotation: This report on youth risk behavior surveillance summarizes data from the 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior survey and trends during 1991-2005 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 40 state surveys and 21 local surveys are also included. The report describes the study methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusion. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings. References are included.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2006. ONDCP media campaign: Contractor's national evaluation did not find that the youth anti-drug media campaign was effective in reducing youth drug use. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Accountability Office, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the effectiveness of the Office of National Drug Control Policy's National Youth Anti-Drug Campaign, which is aimed at preventing the initiation of or curtailing the use of drugs among youth. The report also assesses a multiyear national report of the campaign conducted by Westat, Inc. The report looks at how Westat provided credible support for its findings about attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of youth and parents toward drug use and youth self-reported drug use. The report also includes results in brief, background information, conclusions, matters for Congressional consideration, and agency comments and evaluation. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report includes three appendices: (1) Westat's methods for addressing evaluation implementation issues, (2) comments from the Office of National Drug Control Policy, and (3) GAO contact and staff acknowledgments.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Campaigns, Children, Drug abuse, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, National programs, Parents, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public policy, Young adults, Youth

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Substance use during pregnancy: 2002 and 2003 update. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on illicit drug use among pregnant and nonpregnant women ages 15 to 44. The fact sheet, which includes results in brief, also discusses illicit drug use, alcohol use, cigarette use, and substance use during the year after giving birth. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Illicit drugs, MCH research, Postpartum women, Smoking, Substance abuse, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use behavior, Surveys, Women's health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Results from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 292 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-28)

Annotation: This report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Overview of findings from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 58 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-27)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

Grunbaum J, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins J, Lowery R, Harris WA, McManus T, Chyen D, Collins J. 2004. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2003. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 53(SS-2):1-96,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from the 2003 national school-based survey and trends during 1991-2003 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 32 state surveys, and 18 of local surveys were conducted during 2003. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; age of initiation of risk behaviors; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; physical inactivity; and overwieght and weight control. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2004. Overview of findings from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 42 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-24)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. A more complete presentation of the initial results of the survey is given in the full report, Results from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings. Both reports present national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental health problems are also included. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2002 and 2003. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; trends in initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; and prevalence and treatment of mental health problems. A discussion is also included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: prevalence estimate tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

Flournoy R, Yen I. 2004. Influence of community factors on health: An annotated bibliography. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 94 pp. (A PolicyLink report)

Annotation: This bibliography provides information into the ways that researchers have investigated community effects on health, their findings, and the program and policy implications that researchers have drawn from their work. Section 1 includes research on how living in a particular neighborhood affects health. Section 2 focuses on how communities that are defined by shared characteristics or experiences, rather than by a shared neighborhood, can influence health.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Bibliographies, Communities, Drug use behavior, Economic factors, Environmental factors, Health, Nutrition, Physical activity, Racial factors, Research, Smoking

Johnson, Bassin, and Shaw. 2004. What is substance abuse treatment?: A booklet for families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 31 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides basic information, for family members and friends of patients addicted to drugs or alcohol, about substance abuse treatment and early recovery. It discusses what to expect when a family member or friend enters treatment, what us happening in the early stages of treatment, treatment planning and care, outpatient and inpatient programs, continuing care and relapse issues, and the impacts on family members or other close caregivers. One section is written especially for young people and their issues of parent substance abuse and the possible need for counseling. Also provided are a glossary and a resource section including government information sources and organizations. The publication is also available in Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockwall II Building, One Choke Cherry Road , Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1660 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 04-3955.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Drug addiction, Family support, Patient care management, Public awareness materials, Rehabilitation, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abusers, Substance use behavior

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2001. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 51(SS-4):1-64,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 34 state surveys, and 18 local surveys conducted among high school students on the topic of health risk behaviors. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Caulkins JP, Pacula RL, Paddock S, Chiesa J. 2002. School-based drug prevention: What kind of drug use does it prevent?. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 174 pp.

Annotation: This book explores data on the societal and program costs of drug use prevention and the effectiveness of several school-based drug, alcohol, and tobacco prevention programs. Chapter topics include a description of study research and methods, social benefits and cost results, lifetime drug consumption without prevention; school-based prevention's effectiveness at the end of the program, adjustments to prevention's effectiveness, and a review of the social costs of drug consumption. The appendix provide estimates for the ten factors in the prevention model, recoding consumption values from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, program descriptions, aggregating program effectiveness data, program effectiveness decay, and effects on lifetime consumption. A bibliography is provided and statistical data are provided in tables throughout the book.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3082-5.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Case studies, Drug abuse, Drug use behavior, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Research, School age children, School linked programs, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention programs, Tobacco use

Clayton S, Brindis C, Hamor J, Raiden-Wright H, Fong C. 2000. Investing in adolescent health: A social imperative for California's future. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, National Adolescent Health Information Center, 97 pp., exec. summ. (8 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents a plan, by the California Adolescent Health Collaborative (ACH), to improve the health of adolescents in California. The report covers three main topics: (1) understanding adolescent health and the issues; (2) eight recommendations for improving adolescent health; and (3) strategies for seven outcome areas--injury prevention; mental health and suicide; nutrition and physical activity ; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; oral health; and environmental and occupational health. Reference are included. An executive summary is available separately. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Adolescents, California, Drug use behavior, Environmental health, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Physical activity, Prevention, Strategic plans, Suicide prevention, Tobacco use

Komro KA, Stigler MH. 2000. Growing absolutely fantastic youth: A review of the research on "best practices". Minneapolis, MN: Konopka Institute for Best Practices in Adolescent Health, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a review of approaches for the promotion of healthy youth development. Topics include family, school, and community interventions for adolescent health-related behaviors in alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use; behaviors related to motor-vehicle occupant injuries; violent and delinquent behavior; suicide; risky sexual behaviors; eating behaviors; and physical activity. The report includes a chart on risk and protective factors in the family and home, school, and community, and concludes with references grouped by topics.

Contact: Konopka Institute for Best Practices in Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware Street SE, Third Floor West, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 625-7137 Secondary Telephone: (800) 276-8642 Fax: (612) 626-2134 E-mail: konopka@umn.edu Web Site: http://www.konopka.umn.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Community programs, Drug use behavior, Eating disorders, Health promotion, Intervention, Prevention, Research reviews, Risk taking, Safety, Smoking, Suicide, Violence, Youth development

Strobino DM, Inglis-Baldy S, Silver GB. 1998, c1999. Effects of drug and alcohol use on perinatal and women's health. [Baltimore, MD]: Johns Hopkins University, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 6 pp. (Perinatal and women's health: issue summary; no. 8)

Annotation: This is a summary of a paper written to highlight policy and program areas needing to be addressed to ensure the continuous improvement of health care and services related to perinatal and women's health over the coming decade. This paper discusses consequences of women's use of drugs and alcohol, drug and alcohol use and abuse preconceptionally and perinatally, interventions, policy and practice issues, and research needs. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug abuse, Drug use behavior, Drug use during pregnancy, Intervention, Policy development, Program development, Women's health

Strobino DM, Silver GB. 1998. Effects of smoking on perinatal and women's health. [Baltimore, MD]: Johns Hopkins University, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 4 pp. (Perinatal and women's health: issue summary; no. 9)

Annotation: This is a summary of a paper written to highlight policy and program areas needing to be addressed to ensure the continuous improvement of health care and services related to perinatal and women's health over the coming decade. This paper discusses how smoking affects these groups: women who smoke, their fetuses in utero, their infants and children, and those exposed to secondhand smoke. Prevention and intervention programs, policy and practice issues, and research needs are also discussed. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Drug abuse, Drug use behavior, Drug use during pregnancy, Intervention, Policy development, Program development, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.