Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (47 total).

Singh AD, and Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, Dental Public Health Policy Committee . 2021. Policy statement: Reducing opioid prescribing by oral health professionals. Reno, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 13 pp.

Annotation: This statement provides data related to reducing opioid prescribing by oral health professionals and highlights policies and strategies, including the introduction, adoption, and promotion of prescribing guidelines by the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Also discussed are state requirements for dentist participation in prescription drug monitoring programs, continuing education for oral health professionals related to pain management, and inclusion of pain-management approaches in dental education. The statement also highlights how state oral health programs have identified and engaged in promising and effective approaches related to opioid prescription practices.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental education, Health policy, Narcotics, Oral health, Pain management, Prescription drugs, Public policy, State programs

Surgeon General of the United States, Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2016. Turn the Tide. [Washington, DC:] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for health professionals and their clients provide information about opioids and describe ways to reduce the risk of opioid addiction and overdose. Information about taking opioids, safe storage and disposal, a help line, and options for sharing personal experiences are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, National initiatives, Opiates, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety, Self help programs

Fobbs E, Grady K, Chiang RJ, Zavacky F. 2015. State school health policy matrix 2.0. [Atlanta, GA]: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors; [Washington, DC]: National Association of State Boards of Education; [Reston, VA]: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide outlines state-level school health policies related to competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in the school environment. Contents include a direct link to the policy and information about which political entity or agency adopted the policy or issued guidance.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drugs, Health policy, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, School food services, Schools, Service delivery systems

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. 2014. Designed for addiction: How the tobacco industry has made cigarettes more addictive, more attractive to kids and even more deadly. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, 42 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes key ways in which tobacco companies design and manipulate their products to attract new youth smokers, create and sustain addiction, mislead consumers to think that they are reducing their risk of disease, and make it more difficult for users to quit.

Contact: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids, 1400 Eye Street, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-5469 Fax: (202) 296-5427 Web Site: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Consumer education, Consumer protection, Drug addiction, Industry, Marketing, Nicotine, Tobacco, Product safety, Research, Risk assessment

National Education Association Health Information Network. 2013. Rx for understanding: Preventing prescription drug abuse–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 104 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 9-12. Contents include 10 lessons that lead students through an inquiry-based, technology inspired project enabling an opportunity to apply the key concepts learned about the misuse, abuse, and proper use of prescription drugs. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, a reproducible student journal, teaching resources, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Secondary schools, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

National Education Association Health Information Network. [2012]. Rx for understanding: Be smart about prescription drugs–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 120 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 5-8. Contents include five sequenced lessons for grades 5-6 and five sequenced lessons for grades 7-8. Each set of lessons acts as a mini-unit, focusing on the same five lesson themes: relating the issue of prescription drug safety to overall health, understanding proper use, understanding misuse, understanding abuse, and conducting an application-based culminating project. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, reproducible student activity sheets, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Middle schools, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

Kolander CA, Ballard D, Chandler C. 2011. Contemporary women's health: Issues for today and the future (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 462 pp.

Annotation: Presented in five parts, this textbook for health and community services professionals and the general public focuses on women's health issues throughout the life cycle with each chapter including a summary, review questions, resource listings and references. Contents include: pt. 1. Foundations of women's health : Introducing women's health ; Becoming a wise consumer ; Developing a healthy lifestyle -- pt. 2. Mental and emotional wellness : Enhancing emotional well-being ; Managing the stress of life -- pt. 3. Sexual and relational wellness : Building healthy relationships ; Exploring women's sexuality ; Designing your reproductive life plan ; Preventing abuse against women -- pt. 4. Contemporary lifestyle and social issues : Eating well ; Keeping fit ; Using alcohol responsibly ; Making wise decisions about tobacco, caffeine, and drugs -- pt. 5. Communicable and chronic conditions : Preventing and controlling infectious diseases ; Preventing and controlling chronic health conditions ; Reducing your risk of cancer.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com $72.80. Document Number: ISBN 0-8151-0626-2.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alternative medicine, Behavior modification, Caffeine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Communicable diseases, Consumer education, Contraceptives, Depression, Developmental stages, Domestic abuse, Drug abuse, Eating disorders, Gynecology, Holistic health, Interpersonal relations, Life cycle, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self esteem, Smoking, Stress management, Weight management, Women's health

Duckworth K, Gruttadaro D, Markey D. 2010. What families should know about adolescent depression (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about adolescent depression and treatment options. It introduces adolescent depression and its causes and symptoms and getting an accurate diagnosis. It then discusses treatment, including talk therapy and medications; risks and benefits of antidepressants, as well as family history and treatment. Risk of suicide is also presented, creating good monitoring systems and safety plans, treatment research, and how to be an effective advocate for an adolescent with depression. The guide concludes with resources.

Contact: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203, Telephone: (703) 524-7600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 950-6264 Fax: (703) 524-9094 E-mail: info@nami.org Web Site: http://www.nami.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Antidepressant drugs, Cognitive therapy, Consumer education materials, Depression, Families, Monitoring, Parents, Safety, Treatment

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2010. How tobacco smoke causes disease: What it means to you–A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes scientific findings about how deadly cigarettes are, how quickly they can damage the body, and ways that tobacco companies have altered cigarettes to make them more addictive. Topics include the chemicals in tobacco smoke; nicotine and addiction; how smoking causes cancer and circulatory and respiratory damage, harms reproduction and children's health, and makes diabetes harder to control; and how secondhand smoke harms nonsmokers. Information about the reasons people chose to quit smoking and resources to help them is included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Advertising, Child health, Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, Nicotine, Oral health, Research, Smoking, Smoking cessation

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2009. Preventing child maltreatment. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 210 pp. (The future of children; v. 19, no. 2, Fall 2009)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores policies and programs on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Articles discuss the importance of an investment-driven prevention approach; characteristics of families associated with elevated risk for maltreatment; community-wide, parenting, and home-visiting prevention programs; preventing abuse and neglect by parents with drug or alcohol problems and preventing sexual abuse; and the present and future roles of the child protection system in preventing abuse.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-3-5.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child sexual abuse, Community programs, Drug abuse, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Prevention

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. 2007. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 362 pp.

Annotation: This report, developed by an expert panel commissioned by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of asthma that will help clinicians and consumers make appropriate decisions about asthma care. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) introduction, (2) definition, pathophysiology, and pathogenesis of asthma, and natural history of asthma, (3) the four components of asthma management (measures of assessment and monitoring, education for a partnership in asthma care, control of environmental factors and comorbid conditions, and medications), (4) managing asthma long-term, and (5) managing exacerbations of asthma. Resources for more information and references are included.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Diagnosis, Education, Environmental exposure, Guidelines, Health care, Prescription drugs, Prevention, Treatment

Pfizer. 2006. Milestones in public health: Accomplishments in public health over the last 100 years. New York, NY: Pfizer, 275 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of milestones in public health during the last century in the United States. The milestones discussed are those identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are advances in (1) addiction, (2) automotive safety, (3) cancer, (4) cardiovascular disease, (5) environmental and occupational health, (6) food safety, (7) infectious disease control, (8) maternal and child health, (9) oral health, and (10) vaccines. One chapter in the book is devoted to each milestone. Each chapter is written by a different expert, and each explores historical developments related to the milestone and presents a case study of the milestone and a vignette illustrating another facet of the milestone. Predictions of advances still to come are offered, as well. The book includes a prologue, an epilogue, and references. Also available as a course.

Contact: Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 733-2323 Web Site: http://www.pfizer.com/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Child health, Children, Communicable disease control, Distance education, Drug addiction, Environmental health, Food safety, History, History, Infants, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Parents, Public health, Vaccines, Women's health

Eaton DK, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins Harris, WA, Lowery R, McManus T, Chyen D, Shanklin S, Lim C, Grunbaum J, Wechsler H. 2006. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-5):1-96,

Annotation: This report on youth risk behavior surveillance summarizes data from the 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior survey and trends during 1991-2005 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 40 state surveys and 21 local surveys are also included. The report describes the study methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusion. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings. References are included.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

American Psychiatric Association and American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry with National Coalition of Concerned Parents, Providers, and Professional Associations. [2005]. The use of medication in treating childhood and adolescent depression: Information for patients and families. [No place]: ParentsMedGuide.org, 9 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet, geared toward children, adolescents, and families, includes practical advice about treating depression in children and adolescents, as well as information about the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision to require a black box warning for antidepressant medications. The fact sheet explains (1) what a black box warning is and what prompted the FDA warning, (2) whether antidepressants can help children and adolescents with depression, (3) whether antidepressants increase the risk of suicide, (4) what other factors increase the risk of suicide, (5) whether talking about suicide increases the risk that a child or adolescent will hurt himself, (6) how to be certain that a child or adolescent has depression, (7) what treatment should consist of, (8) how parents can help monitor their child or adolescent, (9) what other treatments are available, (10) whether depression will pass without treatment, (11) whether children or adolescents can continue taking antidepressants currently being prescribed, and (12) how parents can advocate for a child or adolescent who has depression.

Contact: ParentsMedGuide.org, Web Site: http://www.ParentsMedGuide.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Antidepressant drugs, Attempted suicide, Child health, Consumer education materials, Depression, Diagnosis, Drug therapy, Mental health, Parents, Risk factors, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Treatment

California Childcare Health Program. 2005–. Fact sheets for families. [Oakland, CA]: California Childcare Health Program,

Annotation: These fact sheets for families cover a wide range of health and safety issues in child care. They are written in easy-to-understand language and are tailored to the perspectives of families. Topics include allergies, brain and behavioral health, healthy environment, illnesses and conditions, injury prevention, nutrition, medications, oral health, parents' health, poisoning, and children with special health care needs. The fact sheets are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-4695 Web Site: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Brain, Child behavior, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Consumer education materials, Environmental health, Families, Injury prevention, Nutrition, Oral health, Parents, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Safety, Spanish language materials

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness. 2005. Use of performance-enhancing substances. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness, 4 pp. (Policy statement)

Annotation: This policy statement provides a generalized but functional definition of performance-enhancing substances and vigorously endorses efforts to eliminate their use among children and adolescents. It discusses the temptation for young people to use performance-enhancing substances, the rationale for issuing the policy statement, current definitions of these substances, strategies to prevent their use, and identifying the young person using these substances. A list of 11 recommendations are provided along with references and a list of resources.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Drug education, Sports, Substance use

Washington State Department of Health, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program and Center for Children with Special Needs. 2004-. Childhood and adolescent depression and anxiety toolkit. ,

Annotation: This tool kit, which is in the form of a Web site, includes online health resources focused on anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. Resources, which can be printed and copied for personal use, are divided into the following categories: (1) introduction, (2) information for families about child and adolescent depression, (3) information for families about anxiety, (4) treatment and referral for depression and anxiety, (5) medications, (6) resources for parents and caregivers, (7) resources for children and adolescents, (8) resources for professionals, (9) additional mental health issues, (10) additional resources, and (11) multilingual resources. Languages include French, German, Iceland, Polish, Russian, and Spanish.

Contact: Seattle Children's Center for Children with Special Needs, P.O. Box 5371, M2-16, Seattle, WA 98105, Telephone: (206) 987-3736 Fax: (206) 884-5741 E-mail: cshcn@seattlechildrens.org Web Site: http://www.cshcn.org

Keywords: Adolescent health, Anxiety, Child health, Consumer education materials, Depression, Families, Mental health, Non English language materials, Prescription drugs, Referrals, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, World Wide Web

Grunbaum J, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins J, Lowery R, Harris WA, McManus T, Chyen D, Collins J. 2004. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2003. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 53(SS-2):1-96,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from the 2003 national school-based survey and trends during 1991-2003 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 32 state surveys, and 18 of local surveys were conducted during 2003. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; age of initiation of risk behaviors; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; physical inactivity; and overwieght and weight control. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2001. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 51(SS-4):1-64,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 34 state surveys, and 18 local surveys conducted among high school students on the topic of health risk behaviors. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.