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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (30 total).

Teitelbaum M, Goplerud E, eds. n.d.. Pregnant and postpartum women and their infants. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Substance Abuse Prevention, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights innovative efforts that are underway to address the treatment and prevention needs of substance using pregnant women, mothers, and their drug affected infants. It also presents a summary of the 1989 annual conference of the National Association for Perinatal Addiction Research and Education and lists information resources including organizations and publications.

Contact: U.S. Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Office for Substance Abuse Prevention, 1 Choke Cherry Road , Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (800) 694-4747 ext. 4820 Fax: (240) 747-5453 Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug affected infants, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Substance abuse, Treatment

Cawthon L. 2004. First Steps database: Safe babies, safe moms. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis, 8 pp. (Fact sheet no. 4.36f)

Annotation: This brief summarizes the Washington state program Safe Babies, Safe Moms (formerly the Comprehensive Program Evaluation Project, or CPEP) implemented to improve the health and welfare of substance abusing mothers and their young children and provides an update to the October 2003 evaluation report with additional outcome measures and longer periods of follow-up. Measures tracked include demonstrated behavior change in the use of more effective family planning methods, reduced levels of parenting stress, decreased arrest rates, a reduction in low birth weight infants for those pregnant women enrolled in the program before delivery, decreased accepted referrals for child abuse or neglect for mothers enrolled before delivery, and higher employment rates for non-substance abusing Medicaid women than substance abusers.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Drug affected infants, High risk mothers, Housing programs, Program evaluation, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Washington, Young children

Cawthon L, Westra K. 2003. Safe babies, safe moms: Program evaluation. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the evaluation of the Washington state program Safe Babies, Safe Moms (formerly the Comprehensive Program Evaluation Project, or CPEP) to: (1) develop and implement comprehensive programs for alcohol- and drug-abusing women and their young children, (2) increase the availability of chemical dependency treatment, (3) implement new services called Targeted Intensive Case Management, and (4) enhance housing support services. Report contents include a summary and introduction to the need for the program and its services, client needs and services provided, a program description, methods used for the evaluation, and findings. Survey results and findings are summarized in charts and tables throughout the report and a bibliography is included.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Drug affected infants, High risk mothers, Housing programs, Program evaluation, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Washington, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2002. A compendium of resources on newborn screening policy and systems development. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 61 pp.

Annotation: This compendium includes selected resources and abstracts on the following topics: (1) general newborn screening; (2) biotinidase deficiency, (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia, (3) congenital hypothyroidism, (4) cystic fibrosis, (5) drug exposure, (6) galactosemia, (7) hearing screening, (8) hemoglobinapathies, (9) HIV, (10) medium chain co-A dehydrogenase deficiency, (11) phenylketonuria. Additional resources are provided on newborn screening policy; ethical, legal, and social issues; costs and financing of screening newborns; laboratory analysis; research and new technologies; and treatment and management. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Patient/Family-Centered Medical Home, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: https://medicalhomeinfo.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx

Keywords: Biotinidase deficiency, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Congenital hypothyroidism, Cystic fibrosis, Drug affected infants, EPSDT, Ethics, Financing, Galactosemia, HIV, Hearing screening, Hemoglobinopathies, Laboratories, Legal issues, Management, Neonatal screening, Phenylketonuria, Research, Technology

Wenzel S, Kosofsky BE, Harvey JA, Iguchi MY, Steinberg P, Watkins KE, Shaikh R. 2001. Prenatal cocaine exposure: Scientific considerations and policy implications. Santa Monica, CA: Rand , 39 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of cocaine on the developing brain of the fetus and offers policy considerations for addressing the issues that arise from cocaine use by pregnant women. Three preventive strategies are outlined; primary (before and during pregnancy), secondary (to identify pregnant women who use drug and minimizing their drug use), and tertiary (to reduce the adverse consequences of substance exposure to children exposed in utero). The report also includes additional sources, and references.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $10.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3001-9.

Keywords: Cocaine, Drug affected infants, Drug use during pregnancy, Fetal development, Neonatal addiction, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abusing pregnant women

Haack MR, ed. 1997. Drug-dependent mothers and their children: Issues in public policy and public health. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, 335 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses popular myths about profiles of drug-addicted mothers and their children, providing an assessment of the physical, psychological, social, and economic effects of drug exposure on children. A synthesis of the state of knowledge about fetal exposure to illicit drugs is presented by contributors from diverse disciplines. They also describe a comprehensive model for services, public and private resources to deliver those services, and approaches to training personnel. This volume also explores ramifications of public policies for social service and health professionals involved in prevention, treatment, and education. It also examines the implications of legislation such as the 1996 Welfare Reform Bill. The book addresses issues in prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal health care within the legislative, legal, child welfare, and education systems. The appendices provide numerous policy statements, a model statute, and resources for program funding, program development, professional development, and professional education.

Contact: Springer Publishing Company, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036, Telephone: (877) 687-7476 E-mail: contactus@springerpub.com Web Site: http://www.springerpub.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8261-9630-6.

Keywords: Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Drug use during pregnancy, Federal legislation, Health services, Pregnant women, Professional education, Public policy, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abusing pregnant women, Welfare reform

Brady C. 1996 (ca.). Substance abusing women: The ultimate home visiting challenge—A report on the University of Florida MIC Project Resource Mothers Program. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the history of the first 5 years of the Maternity and Infant Care Resource Mothers Project at the University of Florida. The project was developed as part of a prenatal care delivery system that provides services in several counties. The project offers family-centered, community-based services through paraprofessional home visitors working with preconceptional, pregnant, and postpartum substance-using women. The report provides an overview of the area served; describes the components of the program, the resource mothers, the women served, the results to date, and program costs and benefits; and summarizes the lessons learned. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 15 South East First Avenue, Suite A, Gainesville, FL 32601, Telephone: (904) 392-4491 Contact Phone: (352) 392-4491 $5.00.

Keywords: Community based services, Drug affected infants, Family centered services, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Outreach, Perinatal care, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Wetherington CL, Smeriglio VL, Finnegan LP, eds. 1996. Behavioral studies of drug-exposed offspring: Methodological issues in human and animal research. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 297 pp. (National Institute on Drug Abuse Research monograph series; no. 164)

Annotation: This research monograph is based upon revisions of presentations made at a technical review held by the National Institute on Drug Abuse at which researchers reviewed the state of the art regarding behavioral assessments of offspring prenatally exposed to abused drugs. The fundamental aim of the monograph is to clarify the methodological issues for future research in this field, to provide caution in the interpretation of research findings, and to suggest future research directions.

Contact: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213, MSC 9561, Bethesda, MD 20892-9561, Telephone: (301) 443-1124 Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.nida.nih.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: NIH 96-4105.

Keywords: Behavior, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Drug use during pregnancy, Research, Research methodology, Substance abusing mothers

Corser K, Adler FP. 1993. When the bough breaks: Pregnancy and the legacy of addiction. Portland, OR: NewSage Press, 112 pp.

Annotation: This book considers the implications of intergenerational cycles of child abuse and drug abuse. It uses personal accounts from women who are addicted to drugs or alcohol to examine the cycle. The narratives reveal accounts of childhood abuse, whether physical or sexual, which these women experienced; their subsequent addictions; and the effects of their addiction upon their own children. It includes accounts of addiction, narratives from mothers and children, and interviews with women who are in various stages of recovery.

Contact: NewSage Press, P.O. Box 607, Troutdale, OR 97060, Telephone: (503) 695-2211 Secondary Telephone: (877) 695-2211 Fax: (503) 695-5406 E-mail: info@newsagepress.com Web Site: http://www.newsagepress.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-939165-19-8.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Child abuse, Drug abuse, Drug affected infants, Personal narratives, Physical abuse, Pregnant women, Sexual abuse, Substance abuse

Soman LA, Dunn-Malhotra E, Halfon N. 1993. Perinatal alcohol and drug use: Access to essential services in 12 California counties. Berkeley, CA: California Policy Seminar, 138 pp. (California Policy Seminar research report; CPS brief. 5(6). March 1993)

Annotation: This report and the accompanying brief describe a research project aimed at gathering information on the services available in California for chemically dependent pregnant and parenting women and young drug-exposed children. The project consisted of a literature review and the development of a comprehensive model of care for the target population that reflects consensus among a statewide panel of experts. Surveys were also conducted to identify and assess state and federally funded programs that provide a range of health and social services to a population that might include chemically dependent pregnant and postpartum women and drug-exposed children from birth to age three.

Contact: California Policy Research Center, 1950 Addison Street #203, Berkeley, CA 94720-7410, Telephone: (510) 642-5514 Fax: (510) 642-8793 E-mail: cprc@ucop.edu The CPS brief is available at no charge; the complete report is available at no charge to state government offices and for $12.00 to all others.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, California, Drug affected infants, Perinatal health, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau. 1993. Report to Congress: National estimates on the number of boarder babies, the cost of their care, and the number of abandoned infants. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a study on the numbers and characteristics of boarder babies and abandoned infants in the U.S. Many of the infants are born either infected with the HIV virus, or have been prenatally exposed to illegal substances. Boarder babies are likely to be discharged into the care of their biological parents or other alternative care setting. Abandoned infants are not likely to be discharged from the hospital into the care of their parents. The costs associated with the care of these infants are also investigated.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abandoned children, Boarder babies, Drug affected infants, HIV, Hospitalization, Infants, Infants, Institutionalization

Hawaii Department of Health. 1992. Report to the sixteenth legislature, state of Hawaii: On Senate concurrent resolution no. 126 S.D. 1 requesting review and recommendations from the Director of Health on the findings and recommendations from the Hawaii State Council on Chemical Dependency and Pregnancy and the Problem of Drug-Exposed Infants. Honolulu, HI: Baby Safe Hawaii, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the mission of the Hawaii State Council on Chemical Dependency and Pregnancy and identifies the accomplishments of the first year of the Baby S.A.F.E. (substance abuse free environment) initiative. It provides recommendations and specific tasks necessary to reduce the number of infants affected from the results of maternal addiction.

Contact: Hawaii Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Branch, Baby S.A.F.E. Program, 741-A Sunset Avenue, Room 208, Honolulu, HI 96816, Telephone: (808) 733-9022 Fax: (808) 733-9032 Web Site: http://health.hawaii.gov/mchb/home/baby-s-a-f-e-program Available at no charge.

Keywords: Drug affected infants, Needs assessment, Pregnant women, State MCH programs, Substance abuse, Treatment

Breyel JM, ed. 1992. Gaining ground: State initiatives for pregnant women and children. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, 74 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings are from a conference held in May 1991 that assessed the progress states are making to improve the health status of mothers and children. The three areas addressed were prenatal care reforms, children's health, and substance abusing pregnant women and their infants. Topics in prenatal care were translating eligibility expansions into enrollment, measuring access and tracking shifts in provider participation, and assessing the results of prenatal care reforms. Topics in children's health were designing a model child health system, improving children's access to care, ensuring that all children receive preventive screens, and linking treatment services to screening services. Topics in substance abuse were understanding the nature and extent of perinatal substance abuse, responding to the problem, financing treatment services, and developing state programs to serve substance abusing pregnant women. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Drug affected infants, Perinatal care, Prenatal care, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Counsel to the Secretary on Drug Abuse Policy, Ad Hoc Drug Policy Group. 1992. Maternal drug abuse and drug exposed children: Understanding the problem. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 82 pp.

Annotation: This discussion paper was written as a step toward defining the problem of maternal drug use and prenatal drug exposure for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its component agencies. Topics covered include research on drug abusing women and their children, preventing and treating drug abuse in pregnant and parenting women, child welfare services for drug abusing families, legislative and judicial responses to drug-exposed infants, and financial assistance programs. Collaborations between systems and promising program models are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Contact Phone: (202) 690-6805 Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF071; DHHS (ADM) 92-1949.

Keywords: Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Counsel to the Secretary on Drug Abuse Policy, Ad Hoc Drug Policy Group. 1992. Maternal drug abuse and drug exposed children: A compendium of HHS activities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 61 pp.

Annotation: This compendium describes programs and other activities with a primary mission related to substance abuse in women, children, and families, and also related programs and activities which include this issue as part of a larger mission.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Contact Phone: (202) 690-6805 Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF072; DHHS (ADM) 92-1948.

Keywords: Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Substance abusing pregnant women

Fox HB, Wicks LB. 1992. Federal funding sources for programs providing out-of-home care to HIV-infected and drug-exposed infants. Washington, DC: Fox Health Policy Consultants, 77 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews federal funding sources that provide continuing support for the various types of medical, developmental, and social services required in out-of-home care programs for babies who remain hospitalized for boarding rather than medical purposes. Information on the funding opportunities under 10 federal programs, including several entitlement programs, block grant programs, and a few specialized programs, is included. The first chapter provides demographic and descriptive data on babies exposed to drugs and infected with HIV. The second chapter describes the types of items and services that need to be available under any out-of-home care arrangement for these babies. The third chapter presents information about the federal funding sources that can be used to finance each of the elements integral to an out-of-home care arrangement. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, 750 17th Street, N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20006-4607, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 496-9067 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Boarder babies, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Federal MCH programs, Federal grants, Financing, Foster care, HIV, Health care financing, Infants with special health care needs

Pathfinder Resources. 1992. Hear, hear: Valuing customer input in programs for children with special health care needs and their families—Sixth Annual National SPRANS Workshop. St. Paul, MN: Pathfinder Resources, 61 pp.

Annotation: The Sixth Annual National SPRANS Workshop was held in March, 1992 in New Orleans. This publication provides the proceedings of the three-day workshop, which focused on the role of the consumer in the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs for children with special health needs and their families. In the context of the workshop, consumers include families, children and youth, payers/funders, other care providers, and other organizations and individuals with a connection to SPRANS/Title V programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Drug affected infants, Early intervention, Family centered services, Foster care, Home visiting, Pediatric AIDS, SPRANS, Service coordination, Supplemental Security Income

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children. 1991. Drug exposed infants. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children, 120 pp. (The future of children; v. 1, no. 1, Spring 1991)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" provides an overview of the problem of drug-exposed infants from multiple perspectives. It discusses how large a problem it is, what is known, where the gaps in knowledge and provision of services lie, and what are the most reasonable policy and program strategies to pursue. Chapters cover estimating the numbers of substance-exposed infants, the medical risks, developmental issues of prenatal exposure, treatment programs for drug-abusing women, responses of the child welfare system and of state legislatures and courts, perspectives of attorneys and judges, and ethical and economic implications of substance abuse.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug affected infants, Infant health, Substance abuse

Brown SS, ed. 1991. Children and parental illicit drug use: Research, clinical, and policy issues: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 24 pp.

Annotation: This booklet summarizes the issues raised at the Workshop on Children and Parental Illicit Drug Use sponsored by the National Forum on the Future of Children and Families. Participants discussed the extent of illicit drug use among pregnant women and among the families in which children develop; the effects of drug use on fetuses, newborns, and older children; and the various intervention programs and policies developed to cope with the growing problems that illicit drug use poses for children and families.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHD076.

Keywords: Cocaine, Drug abuse, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Parenting, Parents, Teratology

Ahart A, Rutsch C, Morgan CH. 1991. Programs serving drug-exposed children and their families. Silver Spring, MD: Macro Systems, 2 v.

Annotation: This two-volume study examines ways in which existing programs or service delivery systems in four cities have adapted to meet the needs of drug-exposed children. Through telephone discussions with 25 expert individuals familiar with issues and programs serving drug-exposed children, the study team identified community programs that were designed or adapted specifically to meet the needs of drug-exposed children. Case studies were conducted in four cities—St. Petersburg, Portland, Los Angeles, and Chicago. The study team viewed programs, interviewed program staff, and visited community organizations. Case study findings were used to identify policy and service delivery issues related to meeting the needs of drug-exposed children and families. "Volume I: Cross-Site Findings and Policy Issues" and "Volume II: Site Visit Summaries and Program Descriptions" are each approximately 150 pages and may be ordered separately.

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 Contact Phone: (202) 245-6613 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Drug affected infants, Perinatal addiction, Substance abuse

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.