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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Barzel R, Holt K, Kolo S. 2018. Prescribing opioids for women of reproductive age: Information for dentists. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document provides an overview of pain management for dental procedures for women of reproductive age and discusses pharmacological considerations for pregnant women (pharmaceutical agents and indications, contraindications, and special considerations), neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome, guidelines for providing opioids, managing acute dental pain, and guidelines for discharging women with opioid prescriptions. Information about prescription drug monitoring programs is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Drug addiction, Guidelines, Narcotics, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Oral health, Pain relieving drugs, Pregnant women, Prescription drugs

Surgeon General of the United States, Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2016. Turn the Tide. [Washington, DC:] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for health professionals and their clients provide information about opioids and describe ways to reduce the risk of opioid addiction and overdose. Information about taking opioids, safe storage and disposal, a help line, and options for sharing personal experiences are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, National initiatives, Opiates, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety, Self help programs

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Rudd RA, Seth P, Felicita D, Scholl L. 2016. Increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths: United States, 2010–2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(50–51):1445–1452,

Annotation: This report examines overall drug overdose death rates during 2010-2015 and opioid overdose death rates during 2014–2015 by subcategories (natural/semisynthetic opioids, methadone, heroin, and synthetic opioids other than methadone). Rates are stratified by demographics, region, and by 28 states with high quality reporting on death certificates of specific drugs involved in overdose deaths. Implications for public health practice are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic pain, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Heroin, Illicit drugs, Methadone, Mortality rates, Opiates, Prescription drugs, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Reducing neonatal abstinence syndrome in Tennessee. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights partnerships to address the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) epidemic in Tennessee. Topics include efforts to expand a community-based program to assist mothers with substance abuse problems and ensure a drug-free and safe home for their newborns; provide start-up costs for a regional detox center for women addicted to prescription drugs; research the effectiveness of detox from opiate drugs during pregnancy, and the long-term effect of detox treatment on NAS rates in the state; and establish a hospital-based NAS treatment process.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Drug use during pregnancy, Financing, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention program, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment, Tennessee

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. 2014. Designed for addiction: How the tobacco industry has made cigarettes more addictive, more attractive to kids and even more deadly. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, 42 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes key ways in which tobacco companies design and manipulate their products to attract new youth smokers, create and sustain addiction, mislead consumers to think that they are reducing their risk of disease, and make it more difficult for users to quit.

Contact: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids, 1400 Eye Street, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-5469 Fax: (202) 296-5427 Web Site: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Consumer education, Consumer protection, Drug addiction, Industry, Marketing, Nicotine, Tobacco, Product safety, Research, Risk assessment

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Strategies for states and health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources, from a webinar held on July 16, 2014, highlight strategies for preventing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Contents include a recording of the speaker's presentations (1 hour, 27 min., 23 sec.), the webinar agenda and speaker biographies, and related materials. Topics include recent trends in opioid abuse and NAS, with an overview of federally-led prevention efforts; the impact of rising NAS rates across the states, including implications for Medicaid and examples of state-level action; a health plan-led initiative to improve care coordination and social support for pregnant women in treatment for addiction; and the latest in NAS treatment, and an assessment of where public and private investments would be most beneficial.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Drug effects, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Model programs, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborns, Opiates, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment

American Dental Association. 2014. Summary of policy and recommendations regarding tobacco: 1964–present. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource summarizes the American Dental Association's policy and recommendations related to tobacco use. Topics include tobacco cessation, tobacco and harm reduction, sources of tobacco-use-prevention and -cessation materials, and tobacco-free schools. The list shows the original adoption date for each policy and recommendation, and revision dates as applicable.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Intervention, Nicotine, Oral health, Resources for professionals, Smokeless tobacco, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

Delta Dental; Wisconsin Dental Association; and University of Wisconsin, Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention. 2013. Treating tobacco use and dependence: A toolkit for dental office teams. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, 73 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for dental office staff focuses on integrating the U.S. Public Health Service recommended clinical practice guideline for treating tobacco use and dependence into standard office procedures. Contents include resources for implementing a brief intervention to help individuals who use tobacco quit. Topics include perceived barriers to tobacco treatment; tobacco dependence treatment roles for dental hygienists, dental assistants, and receptionists; medication resource materials for clinicians; consumer-education materials; and clinician reference materials.

Contact: University of Wisconsin, Center for Tobacco Research & Intervention, 1930 Monroe, Suite 200, Madison, WI 53711, Telephone: (608) 262-8673 Fax: (608) 265-3102 Web Site: http://www.ctri.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Drug addiction, Guidelines, Intervention, Model programs, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Reimbursement, Resources for professionals, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Wisconsin

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2012. Preventing tobacco use among youth and young adults: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 899 pp., exec. summ. (11 pp.).

Annotation: This report provides information about the scientific evidence on smoking among adolescents and young adults. Topics include research on diseases caused by early tobacco use, the addiction process, epidemiology, risk factors, the tobacco industry’s influence, and prevention. An executive summary, consumer booklet, fact sheet, parent and physician conversation cards, public service announcements, and promotional buttons and e-cards are also available. The consumer booklet and fact sheet are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Drug addiction, Epidemiology, Health behavior, Marketing, Prevention, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Statistical data, Tobacco use, Young adults

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. 2011. Adolescent substance use: America's no. 1 public health problem. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 406 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about adolescent alcohol consumption and substance abuse, including the abuse of prescription drugs and illegal drugs. The report explains the problem and discusses its magnitude, consequences, messages that promote adolescent substance abuse, adolescent perceptions and expectations,factors that compound or reduce the risk of adolescent substance abuse and addiction, prevention approaches and barriers to improvement, and treatment.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol intoxication, Drug addiction, Health promotion, Mass media, Prevention, Substance abuse, Treatment

Sidransky D, Norman LA, McCarthy A, Taylor PL, eds. 2010. How tobacco smoke causes disease: The biology and behavioral basis for smoking-attributable disease. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 706 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the ways tobacco smoke damages organs in the body and causes disease and death. Topics include how and why smokers become addicted and how nicotine compares with heroin and cocaine in its hold on users and its effects on the brain. In addition, the report discusses how chemicals in cigarette smoke impair the immune system and why smokers are more likely to suffer from chronic disease than are nonsmokers. Companion booklets for consumers and clinicians and additional online resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Addictions, Biomechanics, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Drug use behavior, Smoking, Tobacco use

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2010. How tobacco smoke causes disease: What it means to you–A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes scientific findings about how deadly cigarettes are, how quickly they can damage the body, and ways that tobacco companies have altered cigarettes to make them more addictive. Topics include the chemicals in tobacco smoke; nicotine and addiction; how smoking causes cancer and circulatory and respiratory damage, harms reproduction and children's health, and makes diabetes harder to control; and how secondhand smoke harms nonsmokers. Information about the reasons people chose to quit smoking and resources to help them is included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Advertising, Child health, Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, Nicotine, Oral health, Research, Smoking, Smoking cessation

Pfizer. 2006. Milestones in public health: Accomplishments in public health over the last 100 years. New York, NY: Pfizer, 275 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of milestones in public health during the last century in the United States. The milestones discussed are those identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are advances in (1) addiction, (2) automotive safety, (3) cancer, (4) cardiovascular disease, (5) environmental and occupational health, (6) food safety, (7) infectious disease control, (8) maternal and child health, (9) oral health, and (10) vaccines. One chapter in the book is devoted to each milestone. Each chapter is written by a different expert, and each explores historical developments related to the milestone and presents a case study of the milestone and a vignette illustrating another facet of the milestone. Predictions of advances still to come are offered, as well. The book includes a prologue, an epilogue, and references. Also available as a course.

Contact: Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 733-2323 Web Site: http://www.pfizer.com/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Child health, Children, Communicable disease control, Distance education, Drug addiction, Environmental health, Food safety, History, History, Infants, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Parents, Public health, Vaccines, Women's health

Generations United. 2006. Meth and child welfare: promising solutions for children, their parents and grandparents. Washington, DC: Generations United, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the effects of methamphetamine on children, families, communities, and the child welfare system. The report identifies strategies to prevent methamphetamine use, keep children safe, and help parents with addictions complete treatment. The report provides recommendations for improving the child welfare system's ability to combat the impact of methamphetamine and many other serious issues facing children and families. The report includes an executive summary, a conclusion, and endnotes.

Contact: Generations United, 1331 H Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-3979 Fax: (202) 289-3952 E-mail: gu@gu.org Web Site: http://www.gu.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Addicts, Child health, Child welfare, Communities, Drug addiction, Families, Grandparents, Methamphetamines, Parents, Prevention, Safety, Substance abuse, Treatment

Johnson, Bassin, and Shaw. 2004. What is substance abuse treatment?: A booklet for families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 31 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides basic information, for family members and friends of patients addicted to drugs or alcohol, about substance abuse treatment and early recovery. It discusses what to expect when a family member or friend enters treatment, what us happening in the early stages of treatment, treatment planning and care, outpatient and inpatient programs, continuing care and relapse issues, and the impacts on family members or other close caregivers. One section is written especially for young people and their issues of parent substance abuse and the possible need for counseling. Also provided are a glossary and a resource section including government information sources and organizations. The publication is also available in Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockwall II Building, One Choke Cherry Road , Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1660 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 04-3955.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Drug addiction, Family support, Patient care management, Public awareness materials, Rehabilitation, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abusers, Substance use behavior

Wenzel S, Kosofsky BE, Harvey JA, Iguchi MY, Steinberg P, Watkins KE, Shaikh R. 2001. Prenatal cocaine exposure: Scientific considerations and policy implications. Santa Monica, CA: Rand , 39 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of cocaine on the developing brain of the fetus and offers policy considerations for addressing the issues that arise from cocaine use by pregnant women. Three preventive strategies are outlined; primary (before and during pregnancy), secondary (to identify pregnant women who use drug and minimizing their drug use), and tertiary (to reduce the adverse consequences of substance exposure to children exposed in utero). The report also includes additional sources, and references.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $10.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3001-9.

Keywords: Cocaine, Drug affected infants, Drug use during pregnancy, Fetal development, Neonatal addiction, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abusing pregnant women

Rosenbaum S, Teitelbaum J. 1999. Cultural competence in Medicaid managed care purchasing: General and behavioral health services for persons with mental and addiction-related illnesses and disorders. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Center for Health Services Research and Policy, 12 pp. (Managed behavioral health care issue brief series; Issue brief no. 4)

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care. 1998. The Healing Place: Strategy transfer guide—Models that work. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 27 pp.

Ahart A, Rutsch C, Morgan CH. 1991. Programs serving drug-exposed children and their families. Silver Spring, MD: Macro Systems, 2 v.

Annotation: This two-volume study examines ways in which existing programs or service delivery systems in four cities have adapted to meet the needs of drug-exposed children. Through telephone discussions with 25 expert individuals familiar with issues and programs serving drug-exposed children, the study team identified community programs that were designed or adapted specifically to meet the needs of drug-exposed children. Case studies were conducted in four cities—St. Petersburg, Portland, Los Angeles, and Chicago. The study team viewed programs, interviewed program staff, and visited community organizations. Case study findings were used to identify policy and service delivery issues related to meeting the needs of drug-exposed children and families. "Volume I: Cross-Site Findings and Policy Issues" and "Volume II: Site Visit Summaries and Program Descriptions" are each approximately 150 pages and may be ordered separately.

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 Contact Phone: (202) 245-6613 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Drug affected infants, Perinatal addiction, Substance abuse

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.