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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (51 total).

Philips Sonicare. n.d.. Session One and Two—Complete Course with Assessment Test . [No place]: Philips Learning Connection Online Learning Center,

Annotation: This continuing education course is designed to educate dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and others about the problems of child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder and vulnerable adult abuse and neglect, and human trafficking. The course aims to teach oral health professionals and other health professionals to recognize indicators of abuse and neglect and to inform them of their legal and ethical responsibilities related to reporting and referring victims.

Contact: Philips Learning Center, Telephone: (800) 692-4295 E-mail: info@theonlinelearningcenter.com Web Site: https://www.theonlinelearningcenter.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Domestic violence, Legal responsibility, Oral health, Professional education, Victims

Philips Sonicare. 2015–. Mid-Atlantic Prevent Abuse and Neglect Through Dental Awareness. [no place]: Philips Oral Healthcare, 1 v.

Annotation: This course is designed to help oral health professionals and others recognize indicators of abuse and neglect and to inform them of their legal and ethical responsibilities related to reporting and referral. Topics include child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse and neglect, and human trafficking.

Contact: Philips Learning Center, Telephone: (800) 692-4295 E-mail: info@theonlinelearningcenter.com Web Site: https://www.theonlinelearningcenter.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Continuing education, Dentistry, Domestic violence, Inservice training, Legal issues, Oral health, Preservice training, Referrals

Mouden LD. 2014. The dental team's role in identifying and preventing family violence. Newtown, PA: Dental Learning Systems LLC, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course provides information on the dental assistant's role in identifying orofacial injuries resulting from abuse or neglect in the dental setting. Topics include child abuse and neglect, identifying abuse or neglect, child maltreatment, conditions that may mimic abuse, family violence, causes of family violence, intervening in family cases involving adults, and local and state initiatives to prevent family violence.

Contact: Dental Learning Systems LLC, AEGIS Communications, P.O. Box 510, Newtown, PA 18940, Telephone: (888) 596-4605 Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Dental assistants, Domestic violence, Injuries, Oral health

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Resources for victims and families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

Futures Without Violence. 2013. Health cares about IPV: Intimate partner violence screening and counseling toolkit. San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence,

Annotation: This toolkit offers resources to help health care professionals and others identify and support clients facing intimate partner violence. Contents include strategies for preparing a health care practice to start screening; screening and intervention approaches and tools; resources tailored to pediatric, adolescent, or reproductive health care settings; strategies and resources for domestic and sexual violence advocates; and promising practices from the field.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Domestic violence, Emotional abuse, Family violence, Intervention, Physical abuse, Resources for professionals, Screening, Sexual abuse

de Boinville M. 2013. Screening for domestic violence in health care settings. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Health Policy, 14 pp. (ASPE policy brief)

Annotation: This brief presents the state of practice and research surrounding domestic violence screening. It discusses reasons for screening in health care settings, the current prevalence of screening and reasons this prevalence is relatively low, existing evidence about screening, and next steps toward ensuring that screening becomes an effective preventive service.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Abuse, Domestic violence, Prevention services, Primary care, Screening

Maschinot B, Cohen J. 2012. Supporting babies and families impacted by caregiver mental health problems, substance abuse, and trauma: A community action guide. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 87 pp.

Annotation: This community action guide describes the experiences of a woman and her infant daughter to point out resources that service providers, advocates, and health professionals can use to better understand and respond to the needs of families and children with problems related to mental health, substance abuse, and trauma. The guide also presents information, resources, and tips to foster unified communities that are responsive to families' needs. Topics include the importance of the birth-to-age-5 developmental stage, threats to resilience, levels of stress in young children and families, protective factors, a strategic framework for action, and moving forward. Brief descriptions of successful programs are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4726.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Community programs, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, High risk groups, Infants, Mental health, Parent support services, Resilience, Resource materials, Stress, Substance abuse, Vulnerability, Young children

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2012. Health care providers and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence. (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 2 pp. (Fact sheet Q+A)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information for health professionals about screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence under the Affordable Care Act. The fact sheet answers questions about new preventive services guidelines, why screening for interpersonal and domestic violence matters, how health professionals can get started with screening, what health professionals should do if a person discloses abuse, and how health professionals can learn more about responding to domestic violence.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Domestic violence, Emotional abuse, Guidelines, Health services, Interpersonal violence, Legislation, Physical abuse, Prevention, Screening, Sexual abuse

Kolander CA, Ballard D, Chandler C. 2011. Contemporary women's health: Issues for today and the future (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 462 pp.

Annotation: Presented in five parts, this textbook for health and community services professionals and the general public focuses on women's health issues throughout the life cycle with each chapter including a summary, review questions, resource listings and references. Contents include: pt. 1. Foundations of women's health : Introducing women's health ; Becoming a wise consumer ; Developing a healthy lifestyle -- pt. 2. Mental and emotional wellness : Enhancing emotional well-being ; Managing the stress of life -- pt. 3. Sexual and relational wellness : Building healthy relationships ; Exploring women's sexuality ; Designing your reproductive life plan ; Preventing abuse against women -- pt. 4. Contemporary lifestyle and social issues : Eating well ; Keeping fit ; Using alcohol responsibly ; Making wise decisions about tobacco, caffeine, and drugs -- pt. 5. Communicable and chronic conditions : Preventing and controlling infectious diseases ; Preventing and controlling chronic health conditions ; Reducing your risk of cancer.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com $72.80. Document Number: ISBN 0-8151-0626-2.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alternative medicine, Behavior modification, Caffeine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Communicable diseases, Consumer education, Contraceptives, Depression, Developmental stages, Domestic abuse, Drug abuse, Eating disorders, Gynecology, Holistic health, Interpersonal relations, Life cycle, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self esteem, Smoking, Stress management, Weight management, Women's health

Zahnd E, Aydin M, Grant D, Holtby S. 2011. The link between intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and mental health in California. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp. (Health policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief presents findings on the linkages between intimate partner violence (IPV), emotional health, and substance use among adults ages 18-65 in California. Topics include psychological distress among IPV victims, violence-related substance abuse, and mental health and substance abuse services needs among IPV victims.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Domestic violence, Emotional trauma, Interpersonal violence, Mental health, Mental health services, Public policy, State surveys, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Women's health

Steinberg P. 2011. Reducing the impact of children's exposure to violence: Results of the national evaluation of Safe Start Promising Approaches. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp. (Research highlights)

Annotation: This report summarizes research from several previous Rand reports related to the impact of children's exposure to violence (CEV) and provides information about the evaluation of 15 Safe Start Promising Approach Programs--CEV program in community settings--to identify how well such programs work in reducing and preventing CEV's harmful effects. The report introduces the issue and addresses the following topics: setting up diverse programs across the nation, conceptually grounding evaluations, what researchers learned about implementation and outcomes of interest, and overall implications.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Community programs, Domestic violence, Evaluation, Maltreated children, Research, School violence, Violence, Violence prevention

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH). 2011. The impact of violence on substance abuse and the mental health and physical health of adolescents and young women. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, 1 video (60 min.). (Webinar #5 of 6)

Annotation: This webinar discusses the impact of domestic violence and sexual violence on the mental and physical health of adolescents and women of childbearing age in North Carolina. Topics include national indicators of child maltreatment; partner or sexual violence prevalence; statistical differences in reporting statistics; child and adolescent experience with sexual or physical violence victimization and risk of health problems; violence and pregnancy; developing partnerships; and approaches for identifying women with these experiences and integrating care. This program is available for continuing education credits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 170 Rosenau Hall, CB #5400, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, E-mail: sphcomm@listserv.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.sph.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Chronic disease, Continuing education, Crisis intervention, Distance education, Domestic violence, MCH training programs, Mental health, North Carolina, Physical abuse, Pregnancy, Screening, Sexual abuse, Substance abuse, Women's health

Family Violence Prevention Fund. 2010. Realizing the promise of home visitation: Addressing domestic violence and child maltreatment—A guide for policymakers. San Francisco, CA: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief is intended to help policymakers and advocates build a strong national policy framework to maximize the effectiveness and reach of early childhood home-visiting programs. More specifically, it is meant to ensure that federal home-visiting policies directly address the needs of mothers and children who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing domestic violence, the link between domestic violence and child abuse and neglect, and the impact of domestic violence on the health and well-being of children and families. The brief also provides an overview of home visiting and presents promising home-visiting programs.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Domestic violence, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Model programs, Public policy, Women's health, Young children

Pew Center on the States. 2010. The case for home visiting: Strong families start with a solid foundation. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief describes the benefits of a home visiting program in providing information and services to new parents and families throughout pregnancy and their child's first three years. Topics include the importance of prenatal care, safe and stable housing, counseling for tobacco or substance abuse, domestic violence prevention, as well as advice on building positive, loving relationships with their children.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Parent child relations, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Substance abuse prevention

Home Visiting Needs Assessment Workgroup. 2010. State of Oregon supplemental information request: Statewide needs assessment. Portland, OR: Oregon Department of Human Services, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report provides statewide data for Oregon in the following categories: premature birth, low-birthweight infants, infant mortality, poverty, crime, domestic violence, school dropout rates, substance abuse, unemployment, child maltreatment, and other indicators of at-risk prenatal, maternal, newborn, or child health. County-level data for the same categories is also provided, and information on the selection process of a unit of analysis is offered. The report also includes information about the quality and capacity of Oregon's existing home-visiting programs and the state's capacity for providing substance abuse treatment. A narrative summary of needs-assessment results concludes the report.

Contact: Oregon Department of Human Services, Maternal and Child Health Section, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 825, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-0252 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-0240 E-mail: dhs.info@state.or.us Web Site: http://public.health.oregon.gov/PHD/Directory/Pages/program.aspx?pid=25 Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child maltreatment, Crime, Domestic violence, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight infants, Needs assessment, Oregon Preterm birth, Poverty, Reproductive health, School dropouts, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse, Treatment, Unemployment, Women's health

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2009. CDC injury research agenda. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 116 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's research agenda, 2009-2018, which focuses on answering questions that will have a relatively rapid impact on how we prevent injuries and reduce their consequences. Topics include cross-cutting priorities for injury research, injury response; unintentional injury prevention at home and in the community, preventing injuries in sports, recreation, and exercise, (4) preventing transportation injuries; preventing child maltreatment, sexual violence and intimate partner violence, preventing suicidal behavior, and preventing youth violence.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Child abuse, Communities, Disabilities, Domestic violence, Injuries, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Recreational injuries, Rehabilitation, Research, Residential injuries, Sports injuries, Suicide prevention, Violence, Violence prevention

Baran N, Litton LJ. 2008. Helping battered women and their children: A guide for domestic violence advocates on the co-occurence of domestic violence and child maltreatment. Washington, DC: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women, 76 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is a companion to the Manual for Domestic Violence Advocates: Negotiating Programs Administered Through the Missouri Department of Social Services, is geared toward domestic violence advocates. The document provides information about (1) complexities of cases in which domestic violence and child maltreatment are present, (2) resources needed to respond effectively to child maltreatment, (3) fostering cross-system collaboration to increase the safety of abused mothers and their children, (4) guidelines on how to respond when either the adult victim or the batterer is responsible for child abuse or neglect, and (5) finding ways to help battered mothers who maltreat their children. Topics covered include co-occurence of domestic violence and child maltreatment; confidentiality, information sharing, and mandatory reporting; tools, resources, and strategies; and cultural competence, bias, and diversity.

Contact: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, University of Nevada, P.O. Box 8970, Reno, NV 89507, Telephone: (775) 784-6012 Fax: (775) 784-6628 E-mail: staff@ncjfcj.org Web Site: http://www.ncjfcj.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child abuse, Collaboration, Confidentiality, Cultural competence, Domestic violence, Maltreated children, Missouri, Mothers, Safety

Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Family Support Services Division. 2008. Domestic violence awareness guide. [Oklahoma City, OK]: Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Family Support Services Division, 79 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about domestic violence with the goal of increasing awareness about this problem in Oklahoma. Background on domestic violence is provided, along with information on who are the victims, who are the batterers, what can be said and done, assessing danger, the legal system, and resources. A section dedicated to how those working with women in crisis can take care of themselves is included, as well.

Contact: Oklahoma Department of Human Services, P.O. Box 25352, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, Telephone: (405) 521-3646 E-mail: InfoReferral@okdhs.org Web Site: http://www.okdhs.org Available from the website. Document Number: OKDHS Pub. No. 01-05.

Keywords: Battered women, Domestic violence, Intervention, Oklahoma, Physical abuse, Prevention, Sexual abuse

Greenbook National Evaluation Team. 2008. The Greenbook Initiative: Final evaluation report. [Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 68 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final evaluation report assesses the extent to which Greenbook implementation activities facilitated cross-system and within-system change and practice in the child welfare agencies, dependency courts, and domestic violence service providers. The Greenbook provides principles and recommendations to guide communities and these three primary systems on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social services, Child abuse, Child welfare agencies, Courts, Domestic violence, Maltreated children, Program evaluation

Children's Trust Fund. 2007. The Nurturing Families Network policy and practice manual. [Hartford, CT]: Children's Trust Fund, 1 v.

Annotation: This manual provides guidance for a statewide network of neighborhood-based community centers and caring family professionals serving Connecticut's first-time parents. The program addresses the challenges they face and works to identify those at risk of harming their children and reducing the incidence and severity of abuse and neglect. Topics include issues in becoming parents and issues addressing poverty, social isolation, mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence. Contents of the manual are divided into four sections. Section one describes the Nurturing Families Network (NFN) and research and evaluation. Section two provides detail on the NFN program development and implementation; staffing requirements; job descriptions; professional development and training; clinical supervisions; and programs in nurturing connections, home visiting, and the nurturing parents group. The third section discusses working with agencies that mandate services, such as the Department of Children and Families. The final section provides documentation tools and contact information for resources throughout Connecticut.

Contact: Children's Trust Fund, 410 Capitol Avenue, Third Floor, Hartford, CT 06106, Telephone: (860) 418-8765 Fax: (860) 418-8780 E-mail: ctf@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/ctf/site/default.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Community programs, Connecticut, Domestic violence, Family centered services, Family support, Manuals, Prevention programs, Professional training, Program descriptions, Training materials

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.