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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (27 total).

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program. 2015. California nutrition and physical activity guidelines for adolescents. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, 1 v.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist case managers in improving the nutrition, physical activity, and healthy eating practices of adolescent clients. Topics include adolescent nutrition, infant feeding, nutrition and physical activity screen, calcium, iron, folate and folic acid, fruits and vegetables, body image and disordered eating, weight management, physical activity, and vegetarianism. Contents include handouts for motivational counseling and education with adolescents.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Case management, Counseling, Dietary guidelines, Food consumption, Food habits, Health education, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Screening

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2012. Nutrition standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs: Final rule. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 80 pp.

Annotation: This final rule updates the meal patterns and nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This rule requires most schools to increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat fluid milk in school meals; reduce the levels of sodium, saturated fat and trans fat in meals; and meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. These improvements to the school meal programs are based on recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and are intended to enhance the diet and health of school children while helping to reduce the upward trend in childhood obesity.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Obesity, Prevention services, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Standards

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry. 2012. What to feed your smile: Oral health and nutrition. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 6 p. (Watch your mouth!)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the importance of nutrition to oral health. Topics include healthy snacking, avoiding drinks containing sugar, the effect of saliva on oral health, how to keep the mouth healthy while eating a vegetarian diet, and vitamins and minerals essential for healthy bones and teeth.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, NE 68509, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 Web Site: http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/Dental-Health.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Nutrition, Oral health, Protective factors, Risk factors, Snacks, Vitamins

Holt K, Wooldridge NH, Story M, Sofka D, eds. 2011. Bright Futures: Nutrition (3rd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 278 pp.

Annotation: This book includes updated guidelines and tools for families and communities to improve the nutritional status of infants, children, and adolescents, and build a foundation for lifelong healthy eating behaviors. Contents include an introduction to promoting good nutrition and physical activity and understanding the role of culture in food choices and nutrition. Additional topics include nutrition supervision from infancy to adolescence and issues, concerns, and tools to use throughout childhood. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $54.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-554-4.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children with special health care needs, Cultural factors, Dietary guidelines, Infants, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutritional requirements, Physical activity, Young children

Holt K, ed. 2011. Bright Futures nutrition (3rd ed.)—Pocket guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 79 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide includes updated guidelines and tools for families and communities to improve the nutritional status of infants, children, and adolescents, and build a foundation for lifelong healthy eating behaviors. Contents include an introduction to the concept of building nutrition into overall health promotion, visions and goals, and the developmental and contextual approach to Bright Futures. It also discusses nutrition supervision for infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence and provides tools on nutrition risk, strategies, positive body image tips, food safety, and an outline of federal nutrition assistance programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $14.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-555-1.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Dietary guidelines, Infants, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutritional requirements, Physical activity, Young children

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2010. Dietary guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, 95 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: These guidelines, published every 5 years since 1980, provide authoritative advice for people ages 2 and older about how dietary habits can promote health and reduce risk for major chronic diseases. The guidelines serve as the basis for federal food and nutrition education programs. The 7th edition includes recommendations for the general population and for specific population groups, such as women who are pregnant. A table with key consumer behaviors and potential strategies for professionals to use in implementing the guidelines is included in the appendix. Selected messages for consumers are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Single copies available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Federal programs, Food habits, Health promotion, Public health nutrition, Risk factors

Stallings VA, Suitor CW, Taylor CL, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. 2010. School meals: Building blocks for healthy children. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on revising its standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. The recommendations are based on a review and assessment of Dietary Reference Intakes (a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine) and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (jointly prepared by the USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The eight recommendations in the report update the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) nutrition standards and meal requirements approved in 1995; shift the focus toward meeting recommendations in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines; emphasize the need for effective implementation; and identify key research topics. The recommendations encompass standards for menu planning and standards for meals as selected by the student (in contrast to those that are simply offered to students). Seventeen appendixes include sample menus, data tales, definitions, and comparisons between the existing guidelines and proposed revisions for school meal preparation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Data, Dietary guidelines, Federal programs, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School food services, School lunch programs

Turner L, Chriqui J, Sandoval A. 2010. School policies and practices to improve health and prevent obesity: National Elementary School Survey results—Executive summary. Chicago, IL: Bridging the Gap, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the ways in which elementary school practices are not aligned with national recommendations concerning diet and physical activity. The findings are based on data obtained from administrators at nationally representative samples of public and private elementary schools that reflect policies and practices in schools during the 2006–07 and 2007–08 school years. Included are survey results related to the nutritional content of meals served through the National School Lunch Program; the availability of "competitive" foods — i.e., food or beverages sold through school stores, vending machines, and a la carte cafeteria lines — and to what extent public school students were offered daily and weekly physical education as recommended by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary Guidelines, Evaluation, Guidelines, Physical activity, School age children, School food services, School lunch programs, School surveys

Briefel RR, Dodd AH, Cabili C, Suitor, CW. 2008. Application of adult-based dietary guidelines to children: Evidence, knowledge gaps, and policy implications—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the science base for dietary guidance for children, including evidence supporting the 2000 and 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and other contemporary guidance statements. The report describes the literature review methodology and synthesizes the recent evidence for children by dietary guideline topic; provides an analysis of the science base for children; and describes data gaps and research needs and implications of these for revising dietary guidance for children.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Dietary guidelines, Literature reviews, Nutrition, Public policy, Research

Dodd AH, Cabili C, Briefel RR, Williams N, Suitor CW. 2008. Summary of published evidence related to dietary guidelines for children, 2004-2008. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 126 pp.

Annotation: This report provides summaries of studies published since the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that may be relevant to the 2010 dietary guidelines. Studies are grouped into the following categories: (1) adequate nutrients within calorie needs, (2) weight management, (3) fats, (4) fruits and vegetables, (5) whole grains, (6) dairy and calcium, (7) carbohydrates, (8) sodium and potassium, and (9) tracking.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Calories, Dietary guidelines, Nutrients, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, Weight management

World Health Organization Study Group on Diet, Nutrition and Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases. 2003. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases: Report of a Joint WHO/FAO expert group. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 149 pp. (WHO Technical report; no. 916)

Annotation: This report discusses preventing chronic diseases related to emerging "affluent" diets in developing countries and reducing the impact of these diseases in developed countries. It was produced by a WHO study group on diet, nutrition, and prevention of noncommunicable diseases meeting in Geneva January 28-Feburary 1, 2002. The report provides information on changes in patterns of disease in relation to changes in diet, the relationships between diet and chronic diseases, information on nutritional and dietary relationships to disease, nutrient goals, nutrition and food policies, experiences in promoting healthy diets in developed countries, food strategies in developing countries, and WHO recommendations. It ends with a list of references and six appendices on recommended dietary allowances, dietary guidelines for diabetes, safe food preparation, dietary recommendation in developed and developing countries, national recommendations, and nutritional approach to food labeling.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 92-4-120916-X.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developed countries, Developing countries, Diabetes, Diet, Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Health policy, Health promotion, Nutrition, Oral health, Osteoporosis, Recommended dietary allowances

American Dietetic Association. 2002. Adolescent nutrition: A springboard for health. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 102(3, Supplement): S1-S111,

Annotation: This supplement to the March 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association focuses on adolescent nutrition. Articles from varying authors include suggestions on the many approaches that have been successful in teaching adolescents about healthful eating and the importance of physical activity (e.g., interventions, Web sites, comprehensive nutrition screening, counseling sessions, school-based nutrition promotion programs). Topics include the physical, psychosocial, and environmental issues adolescents face as they mature into young adulthood; and how dietetic professionals can address these concerns while providing nutrition counseling. The supplement issue concludes with a section for professional interest on adolescent health organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, Telephone: (800) 877-1600 Secondary Telephone: (312) 899-0400 Contact Phone: (312) 899-4854 Contact Fax: (312) 899-4739 Contact E-mail: sdenny@eatright.org Web Site: http://www.eatright.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Dietary guidelines, Dietitians, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Program descriptions, Psychosocial development, Research, Social factors, Weight management, Young adults

U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2000. Nutrition and your health: Dietary guidelines for Americans. (5th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 39 pp. (Home and garden bulletin; no. 232)

Annotation: This publication provides tips to help children two years and older and adults use the national dietary guidelines to achieve fitness and good nutrition to maintain good health. It discusses healthy weights, physical activity, keeping food safe, and ways to make healthy food choices. It includes a list of resources for additional nutrition-related information.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary guidelines, Nutrition education, Physical fitness, Weight management

Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 1999. Food guide pyramid for young children: A daily guide for 2- to 6-year-olds. [Washington, DC]: Center for Nutrition, Policy and Promotion , 3 items; 1 color poster (approx. 25 x 33 inches), 1 color flyer, 1 black and white flyer.

Academy for Educational Development, LINKAGES Project. 1999. Recommended feeding and dietary practices to improve infant and maternal nutrition. Washington, DC: LINKAGES Project, Academy for Educational Development, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides guidelines for feeding practices to improve the nutrition of infants, ages 0-6 months and 6-24 months, and also dietiary practices to improve the nutrition of adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. The document provides technical justification for the guidelines and also identifies and discusses determinants of nutritional status.

Contact: FHI 360 , 359 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: (919) 544-7040 Fax: (919) 544-7261 E-mail: communicationsmail@aed.org Web Site: http://www.fhi360.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status, Barriers, Breastfeeding, Delayed childbearing, Dietary guidelines, Family planning, Feeding, Infant nutrition, Intervention, Low birth weight, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition disorders, Physical activity, Premature infants, Prenatal nutrition

Duyff RL, Giarratano SC, Zuzich MF. 1995. Nutrition, health, and safety for preschool children. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 447 pp.

Annotation: This textbook is written for future caregivers and teachers of children from infancy to age 5. The first four chapters cover nutrition basics, meal planning, and safe food preparation and storage. Chapters 5 to 9 apply this information to the different age groups, discussing growth and development, cultural differences, and children with special needs. Chapters 10 through 13 emphasize safety, working with children with special health needs, prevention of infections and accidents, and emergency preparedness. Chapter 14 discusses lesson plans and curricula, and chapter 15 suggests how to involve parents. The appendices give recommended dietary allowances, nutritive values of foods, growth charts, and information on federal food programs, followed by a glossary and reference list.

Contact: Macmillan/McGraw-Hill School Publishing, Glencoe Division, P.O. Box 543, Blacklick, OH 43004-0554, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Secondary Telephone: (800) 334-7344 Fax: (614) 755-5682 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.glencoe.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-02-802089-8.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child care, Child care centers, Child health, Child nutrition, Child safety, Dietary guidelines, Infant nutrition, Textbooks

Georgia Department of Human Resources, Office of Nutrition. [1993]. Food guide pyramid training. Atlanta, GA: Georgia Department of Human Resources, Office of Nutrition, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This teaching guide is designed to instruct public health professionals concerning the information provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guide pyramid, with the goal of emphasizing the importance of diet in health promotion and disease prevention. The guide includes three modules: (1) Fats, sweets, and oils: making wise choices; (2) foods and nutrients; and (3) applying the food guide pyramid. Transparencies and handouts are included in the guide.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Diet, Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Food pyramid, Health promotion, Nutrition education, Nutritional requirements, Professional education, Public health nutritionists

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 1992. Building for the future: Nutrition guidance for the child nutrition programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, 61 pp.

Annotation: This manual with a multicolored poster was developed jointly by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (DHHS). Food service professionals will find guidance for implementing the 1990 Dietary Guidelines for Americans helpful in providing proper nutrition to children served under the Child Nutrition Programs. Practical suggestions for meal planning and activities are presented for each of the dietary guidelines, and, when appropriate, for varying age groups. The publication is designed for a large audience ranging from directors of multi-unit school systems to family child care providers and food service managers in adult and child care centers. The information is also useful for others in the education community who are interested in nutrition, including teachers, parents, and administrators who participate in the programs. The content will serve as a basis for revisions of USDA meal patterns and menu planning guides and the development of new recipes and commodity food specifications.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Contact Phone: (703) 305-2556 Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website. Document Number: FNS-279.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Nutrition programs

Woteki CE, Thomas PR, eds. 1992. Eat for life: The Food and Nutrition Board's guide to reducing your risk of chronic disease. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 179 pp.

Annotation: This book, the third in a series resulting from the National Research Council's study of the relationship between diet and chronic disease, provides consumers practical recommendations for incorporating the dietary guidelines into everyday life. Other titles based on this study include Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk (1989) and Improving America's Diet and Health: From Recommendations to Action (1991). Eat for Life introduces a nine-point dietary plan for reducing the risk of diet-related chronic disease. Trends in the American diet, both historical and popular, and tips for shopping, cooking, and eating out are included. Protein, fiber, cholesterol, and fat in relation to food are explained, and their relationship to chronic diseases are specified. Among the chronic diseases highlighted are heart disease, hypertension, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis. Appendices include the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowances and resources that provide additional information.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Contact Phone: (800) 624-6242 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Dietary guidelines, Eating disorders, Food habits, Hypertension, Osteoporosis

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.