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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (101 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 6: Percent of children, ages 9 through 35 months, who received a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool in the past year. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 6, percent of children, ages 9 through 35 months, who received a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool in the past year. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) data collection, measurement, and existing landscape; (2) policy research, development, and implementation; (3) systems coordination; (4) technical assistance and training; (5) education, engagement, and resource development; and (6) other program strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Developmental screening, Infants, Model programs, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2018. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 6: Developmental screening [NPM 6 brief]. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies for state Title V programs to consider to increase the percent of children ages 9-71 months receiving a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool.. Contents include information about the evidence continuum and the approach to the review, including examples of each type of intervention and its evidence rating; key findings; and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc

Keywords: Block grants, Developmental screening, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Young children

Garcia S, Brown E, Strobino D, Minkovitz C. 2018. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 6 developmental screening evidence review. , 48 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percent of children, ages 9 through 71 months, receiving a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc

Keywords: Block grants, Developmental screening, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2017. Early childhood developmental screening and Title V: Building better systems. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 13 pp. (An issue brief sharing Title V strategies and measures on National pPerformance Measure 6: Developmental screening)

Annotation: This issue brief provides insight into developmental screening activities of Maternal and Child Health Title V state programs, which are aimed at addressing the growing incidence of developmental disabilities and improving comprehensive systems and services to better support early childhood development. It describes activities of states which have chosen National Performance Measure 6 (Percentage of children, ages 9 through 71 months, receiving a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool), discusses challenges, and point to next steps.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Measures, State programs, Title V programs

Massachusetts Act Early. 2016. Considering culture in autism screening. [no place]: Massachusetts Act Early, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document for primary care health professionals provides tips for promoting the identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and other developmental disabilities for children from immigrant families or from families whose primary language is not English. Contents include tips for culturally- and linguistically-competent autism screening; the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) screening tool in English and in four translations (Chinese, Haitian Creole, Spanish, and Vietnamese); an assortment of materials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Learn the Signs. Act Early campaign for use in practice; and resource and referral information.

Contact: Massachusetts Act Early, MA Web Site: www.maactearly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Culturally competent services, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early identification, Immigrants, Infants, Massachusetts, Non English language materials, Public awareness campaign materials, Referrals, State initiatives, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Friends of Children Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters: Poverty and child health–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 21 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of program summaries describes the approaches of American Academy of Pediatrics' state chapters to develop and implement programs focused on poverty and child health in California, New York City, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Topics include developing and using innovative technologies to address food insecurity, pediatricians promoting food security, ensuring the delivery of health and developmental screening services to young children who are homeless, supporting adolescent parents and their children, and accessing summer meal programs. Each summary includes information about program collaboration, evaluation and measurement, outcomes, barriers and lessons learned, and future plans.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, Developmental screening, Food, Health screening, Healthy People 2020, Homeless persons, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition, Poverty, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships

Kansas Initiative for Developmental Ongoing Screening. 2015–. KIDOS toolkit. Topeka, KS: Kansas Department of Health and Environment; University of Kansas Center for Public Partnerships and Research, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit for communities provides guidance and resources for examining and improving developmental screening child find and referral systems. The toolkit is arranged in the following four phases of action: generate ideas and dialogue (convene and orient), initiate action (assess), organizing for impact (plan), and sustain action and impact (act and review). Each phase includes a series of recommended activities. The activities are accompanied by concept overviews, exercises, recommended readings, and other resources to assist community implementation teams. Users can browse the toolkit and select resources that best fit the community's needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Curtis State Office Building, 1000 S.W. Jackson, Suite 540, Topeka, KS 66612-1367, Telephone: (785) 296-0461 Fax: (785) 368-6368 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Infants, Information systems, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Referrals, Sustainability, Young children

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2015. Speech and language delay and disorders in children age 5 and younger: Screening. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2015. Resources for Title V action planning: Developmental screening strategies and measures. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 8 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This document highlights strategies, measures and resources to help Title V develop action plans to implement and improve screening and early identification systems and impact the national performance measure on developmental screening

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Infants with special health care needs, Program development

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2015. Putting it all together: Case example on using CYSHCN standards and SPHARC tools and resources to develop an action plan. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 11 pp.

Annotation: This case example illustrates how a state Title V program – in hypothetical state X – could use existing tools and resources developed by the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs in developing an action plan to address developmental screening rates.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2015. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #6: Developmental screening. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #6: Developmental Screening--percent of children, ages 10 through 71 months, receiving a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool. It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: , Block grants, Developmental screening, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Young children

Arizona Department of Health Services. 2014–. Training opportunities: Developmental screening and fluoride varnish training. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource for clinicians explains how to receive training and reimbursement for performing developmental screenings and applying fluoride varnish in Arizona. Topics include state certification requirements; training locations, descriptions, schedules, and fees; how to be reimbursed; and instructions for purchasing supplies.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, 150 North 18th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85007-2670, Telephone: (602) 542-1025 Fax: (602) 542-0883 E-mail: piowebmaster@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Certification, Developmental screening, Fluorides, Infants, Oral health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reimbursement, Resources for professionals, State programs, Training, Young children

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services in Medicaid: Resources for families (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) Services in Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Child health supervision, Consumer education materials, Developmental screening, EPSDT, Electronic publications, Families, Medicaid

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive! . 2014. A compendium of screening measures for young children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 111 pp.

Annotation: This compendium is a collection of research-based developmental screening tools (screeners) for children under age 5. The compendium provides information on the purpose of developmental screening and the reliability and validity of commonly-used screeners for different languages and populations. Contents include summary tables that provide general information about screeners, individual instrument profiles, and the standards used to evaluate the tools' reliability and validity.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Evaluation, Infant development, Infants, Measures, Standards, Young children

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. 2014. Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes a federal coordinated effort to encourage healthy child development,universal developmental and behavioral screening for children, and support for the families and providers who care for them. Contents include information about the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, the Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children, and a list of accompanying guides tailored for use by early care and education providers, early intervention service and early childhood special education providers, families, primary care providers, communities, child welfare, home visitors, behavioral health providers, and housing and homeless shelter providers. Resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early intervention services, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Infant development, Infants, Measures, Spanish language materials, Young children

U.S. Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services. 2014. EPSDT: A guide for states–Coverage in the Medicaid benefit for children and adolescents. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services, 38 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended to help states, health professionals, and others understand the scope of services covered under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program. The guide provides information about periodic and interperiodic screenings, diagnostic services, the scope of treatment services, permissible limitations on coverage of EPSDT services, services available under other federal authorities, access to services, and notice and hearing requirements.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, EPSDT, Health supervision, Medicaid, Well child care

U.S. Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services. 2014. Paving the road to good health: Strategies for increasing Medicaid adolescent well-care visits. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses why adolescent health is important, the adolescent well-care visit, and strategies for promoting adolescent well-care visits, including adopting current Bright Futures guidelines for adolescents, incentivizing preventive care, encouraging teen-centered care, leveraging missed opportunities, using social media, and developing partnerships with key community stakeholders.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Developmental screening, EPSDT, Health supervision, Medicaid, Well child care

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Screening: Resource brief (3rd ed., upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

Johnson-Staub C. 2014. First steps for early success: State strategies to support develpmental screening in early childhood settings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses current trends to access to developmental screening, private and federal efforts to increase access (including Head Start, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Parts B and C, Medicaid and Title V of the Maternal and Child Health Block Grants), and challenges in expanding access. It then discusses state policies supporting developmental screening in child care and early education (including licensing, subsidies, pre-kindergarten, quality initiatives and service coordination) and state policy recommendations.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Developmental screening, Public policies, State programs, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.