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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Roux AM, Rast JE, Anderson KA, Shattuck PT. 2017. National autism indicators report: Develomental disability services and outcomes in adulthood. Philadelphia, PA: A. J. Drexel Autism Institute, Life Course Outcomes Research Program, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the needs of adults with autism spectrum disorders who have more severe challenges, including those who have just left the special education system and those who are at the end of their working years, to look at differences in services and outcomes across the life course. It includes data on individuals with other forms of developmental disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, E-mail: https://drexel.ed Web Site: https://drexel.edu/autisminstitute/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Developmental disabilities, Developmental disability programs, Special health care needs, Statistics

Spears H, Carman R. [2011]. Increasing trainee survey responses: Best practice methods for obtaining high response rates from trainees. [Silver Spring, MD]: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report describes practices suggested by training centers on disabilities identified by the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) as those that consistently report the highest survey response rates from their trainees. Based on interviews conducted by AUCD with training directors and former trainees from five network programs, the report lists four themes of best practice identified as key components in yielding high trainee survey response rates. The methodology used by AUCD is described in detail, and specific examples of practices that resulted in the highest survey response rates are explained. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental disability programs, Disabilities, Federal programs, Professional training, Program improvement, Surveys

Davis M, Jivanjee P, Koroloff N. 2010. Paving the way: Meeting transition needs of young people with developmental disabilities and serious mental health conditions. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 73 pp.

Annotation: This report includes eight case studies of programs providing innovative service for adolescents and young adults (ages 16-24) who have both a developmental disability and a mental health condition. The report also includes six short descriptions of specific best practices. The programs featured in the report include a school-based transition program, outpatient mental health services, an employment-preparation program, programs supporting youth transitions from restrictive environments to community settings, system-level crisis-prevention and intervention planning, and system-level planning and consultation.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Developmental disabilities, Developmental disability programs, Health services, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Model programs, Prevention, Program, Service delivery systems, Social services, Transition planning, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.