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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (250 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders. n.d.. Former trainee follow-up survey. [Cincinnati, OH]: University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders, 2 items (4 pp., 5 pp.).

Annotation: These forms are a follow up survey of the former participants in the University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders training programs. Theyprovide space to record information about the participants and their comments and assessment of the program. One version is for former trainees with 300+ contact hours; the other is a modified version for trainees with 300+ contact hours who participated in the Interdisciplinary Leadership Core Curriculum since 1987-1988.

Keywords: Developmental disabilities, Evaluation, MCH training, Surveys

Nelson R. n.d.. CHSC Parent Partnership Project: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa , 46 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to strengthen family-centered care for Iowa children with special health care needs by expanding parent participation in CHSC services development, by creating a statewide parent consultant network, and by enhancing community opportunities for parents to meet with one another and with professionals in a family-oriented experience. Program plans included an annual statewide issues forum; a regional parent consultant network composed of 2 parents from each of the 13 CHSC service regions; and family enrichment weekends designed to bring together parents and children for discussion, reflection, and recreation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146777.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Parent Networks, Parent-Professional Communication, Parents

Goldfarb F, Levitz B, Hernancez J, DeMaio S, Smith MA, Ortman D, Felty w, Seuer S, and Russo L. 2019. Fabric not fringe: Weaving family involvement throughout training and practice for professionals and advocates working with individuals with disabilities and special health csre needs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 27 pp.

Annotation: This white paper approaches family involvement from the perspective of the family discipline itself, and the ongoing paradigm shift in family-centered care--from fringe to fabric. This document includes a summary of the history of family involvement in the LEND network and a series of 8 individual handouts which detail the definition, need, benefits, resources and strategies associated with each type of family involvement.

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Family centered care, Parent participation

Petek S, Metzker B. 2018. Improving access to dental services for individuals with developmental disabilities. Sacramento, CA: California Legislative Analyst's Office, 38 pp. (An LAO report)

Annotation: This report analyzes the extent to which oral health services are available and sufficient for individuals with developmental disabilities. The report provides background information and discusses problems with access to oral health services for this population, steps taken to address the problem, and causes of the problem. Recommendations for improving access are provided.

Contact: California Legislative Analyst's Office, 925 L Street,Suite 1000, Sacraemento, CA 95814, Web Site: http://www.lao.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Oral health

Public Counsel. 2017. Assuring equitable funding of services for children with developmental disabilities. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes purchase of services authorization data for race, ethnic, and language group disparities for infants, children, and youth from birth to age 21 in California; discusses possible root causes; and makes recommendations for addressing the disparities. Contents include background, 25 years of research studies on service disparities, data reporting requirements and compliance, study methodology and approach, a summary of findings, detailed results, recommendations, conclusion, and next steps.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescents, Barriers, California, Children, Developmental disabilities, Ethnic factors, Financing, Geographic factors, Infants, Language, Legal issues, Policy analysis, State legislation

Massachusetts Act Early. 2016. Considering culture in autism screening. [no place]: Massachusetts Act Early, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document for primary care health professionals provides tips for promoting the identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and other developmental disabilities for children from immigrant families or from families whose primary language is not English. Contents include tips for culturally- and linguistically-competent autism screening; the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) screening tool in English and in four translations (Chinese, Haitian Creole, Spanish, and Vietnamese); an assortment of materials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Learn the Signs. Act Early campaign for use in practice; and resource and referral information.

Contact: Massachusetts Act Early, MA Web Site: www.maactearly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Culturally competent services, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early identification, Immigrants, Infants, Massachusetts, Non English language materials, Public awareness campaign materials, Referrals, State initiatives, Young children

Perry J, Kaufman B, Vasquez E. 2015. Strategic thinking report: LEND and DBP programs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from interviews and meetings with maternal and child (MCH) health program directors and other stakeholders about future directions for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) and Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) training programs. Contents include recommendations for strategic action in the following five areas: training pipelines for LEND and DBP programs; models of training and clinical care that are accessible and can be sustained; opportunities for trainees to learn and apply principles of MCH leadership training; collaboration with Title V and other partners; and policies and practices important to LEND and DBP programs, individuals with disabilities and their families, and the professionals who serve them. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development disorders, Collaboration, Developmental disabilities, Developmental pediatrics, Leadership, MCH training programs, Model programs, Pediatric neurology, Policy development, Strategic plans, Title V programs

Cooley WC, Cheetham T. 2015. Integrating young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities into your practice: Tips for adult health care providers. Washington, DC: Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, 3 pp. (Practice resource; no. 3)

Annotation: This resource offers tips for preparing the office and staff for caring for young adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Topics include recommended transition actions that can be taken prior to the initial visit, during the visit, and after the visit. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Developmental disabilities, Health care delivery, Intellectual development, Patient care planning, Self care, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Young adults

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. 2015. MCHB graduate education programs support Title V block grant transformation: Collaboration to advance shared goals. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, 8 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau's graduate education training programs. Topics include programs' areas of expertise and efforts to collaborate with state Title V programs to address regional, state, and local maternal and child health needs and priorities through technical assistance, consultation, continuing education and training, and work force and leadership development. Examples of collaborative activities are included.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Collaboration, Continuing education, Developmental disabilities, Federal programs, Graduate education, Leadership, MCH training programs, Multidisciplinary approach, Nutrition, Technical assistance, Work force

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education. 2015. Policy statement on inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 43 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement sets a vision and provides recommendations to states, local educational agencies, schools, and public and private early childhood programs for increasing the inclusion of infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities in high-quality early childhood programs. Contents include information about the scientific base for the benefits of inclusion, the legal foundation for inclusion, challenges to inclusion in early childhood programs, partnering to build a nationwide culture of inclusion, and recommendations for state action.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Federal initiatives, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Infants, Learning, Legal responsibility, Policy development, Program development, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Schools, Young children

Special Olympics. 2014-. Project UNIFY toolkit. Washington, DC: Special Olympics,

Annotation: This toolkit provides resources to help schools implement Project UNIFY, an initiative that focuses on social inclusion that brings youth with and without intellectual disabilities together through sports and related activities. The resources describe Project UNIFY's vision, its major components, how to get started, implementation models, the connection to equal education and inclusion, evaluation reports, and the project's impact.

Contact: Special Olympics, 1133 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3604, Telephone: (202) 628-3630 Secondary Telephone: (800) 700-8585 Fax: (202) 824-0200 E-mail: info@specialolympics.org Web Site: http://www.specialolympics.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Physical fitness, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Inclusive schools, Information services, Mental retardation, School health programs, Sports

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive! . 2014. A compendium of screening measures for young children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 111 pp.

Annotation: This compendium is a collection of research-based developmental screening tools (screeners) for children under age 5. The compendium provides information on the purpose of developmental screening and the reliability and validity of commonly-used screeners for different languages and populations. Contents include summary tables that provide general information about screeners, individual instrument profiles, and the standards used to evaluate the tools' reliability and validity.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Evaluation, Infant development, Infants, Measures, Standards, Young children

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. 2014. Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes a federal coordinated effort to encourage healthy child development,universal developmental and behavioral screening for children, and support for the families and providers who care for them. Contents include information about the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, the Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children, and a list of accompanying guides tailored for use by early care and education providers, early intervention service and early childhood special education providers, families, primary care providers, communities, child welfare, home visitors, behavioral health providers, and housing and homeless shelter providers. Resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early intervention services, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Infant development, Infants, Measures, Spanish language materials, Young children

Antosh AA, Blair M, Edwards K, Goode T, Hewitt A, Izzo M, Johnson DR, Raynor O, Riddle I, Shanley JL, Walker R, Wehmeyer M. 2014. A comprehensive approach to transition. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 21 pp.

2014. Disability and health. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials,

Annotation: This web page links to resources that provide an overview of the barriers and challenges that people with disabilities face when accessing preventive health and health promotion services. Also included are 10 case studies developed by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) that provide a snapshot of what state public health departments are doing to address the health needs of people with disabilities.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Barriers, Community programs, Developmental disabilities, Disabilities, Health promotion, Physical disabilities

Association of University Centers on Disabilities. 2014. Grant writing and grant management tool kit for self-advocates. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 42 pp.

Zero to Three. (2013). Improving access to early identification and intervention: 211 LA County developmental screening and care coordination. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on the efforts of 211 L.A. County's Developmental Screening and Care Coordination Program, which works to encourage partnerships between health professionals and community organizations to identify children at risk for developmental delays. The brief provides information about the program and about the importance of identifying developmental delays early. A personal story about a parent and child who received help from the program is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services, Infant development, Infants, Infants with developmental disabilities, Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment, Service coordination, Young children

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health. 2013. National profile of children with special health care needs and autism spectrum disorders: Key findings from the 2009/10 NS-CSHCN and 2011/12 NSCH. Portland, OR: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes key findings on children with special health care needs and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). and the 2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). It explains what autism spectrum disorders are; discusses the impact of health system performance on families who have children with ASD; and assesses to what extent children with ASD are receiving the minimum quality of care based on measures derived from the national surveys. The report also discusses the extent to which home, school, and neighborhood environments influence CSHCN with ASD. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: http://www.cahmi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, National surveys, Reports

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.