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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (2,622 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

Darwin C. n.d.. The origin of species [...] and the descent of man [...]. New York, NY: Random House, 1000 pp. (The Modern Library)

Annotation: This volume contains two publications, the first describing the theories of evolution and the second containing additional data with a section on the hypothesis that sexual selection exercises a major influence on the evolution of species.

Contact: Random House, 1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, Telephone: (212) 782-9000 Fax: (212) 572-6066 Web Site: http://www.randomhouse.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Evolution, Human development

National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. n.d.. Infancy in the eighties: Social policy and the earliest years of life. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 20 pp.

Annotation: This small pamphlet summarizes new knowledge about infant and toddler development and its impact on public policy. New research findings and clinical experience can be used to increase the effectiveness of legislation affecting children and families, programs for health screening, disease prevention and related issues for families, and public and private policies toward parents in the workplace.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (202) 638-0840 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org

Keywords: Family support services, Health policy, Infant health services, Policy development

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

Handgun Control Inc., and Center to Prevent Handgun Violence. n.d.. We have a comprehensive program to combat gun violence. Washington, DC: Handgun Control, Inc., and Center to Prevent Handgun Violence, 1 p.

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settingsā€”Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Larsen,B. n.d.. Symbolic logic: A promising decision making tool. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 25 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-8 (5))

U.S. Children's Bureau. n.d.. Your child from 4 to 6. (Draft) [four to six]. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 20 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This draft version of this brochure discusses the use of child care, how children this age are unusual, children's fear of losing their mother, nutrition, giving children tasks, same sex pals, sleep needs, learning by doing, meal time, children's relationship to their father, telling untrue tales, taking the child to the doctor, using shocking language, toys, asserting independence, and planning for another baby. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Pamphlets, Preschool children

Great Expectations. n.d.. Parenting manual. New Orleans, LA: Healthy Start/Great Expectations, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This training manual is a curriculum in parenting for Great Expectation clients. The first section of the document includes a description of the eight week course; a parenting training schedule; guidelines for group leader or coordinator; ground rules for the participants; a parent pledge; and recruiting suggestions. The remainder of the manual provides resource material and handouts on these topics: orientation; health education; safety; nurturing and self esteem; communication and play; child reporting (types of abuse, types of neglect, mandated reporters, and factors that sometimes lead to abuse or neglect); and discipline. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Contact Phone: (504 ) 565-7601 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child care, Child development, Communication, Curricula, Discipline, Education, Family planning, Health education, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Louisiana, Nutrition, Outreach, Parenting, Play, Prenatal care, Prevention, Safety, Self-esteem

Oakland Healthy Start. n.d.. Infant care. Oakland, CA: Oakland Healthy Start, and Studio Three, Samuel Merritt College, 1 videotape (13: 21 minutes, VHS 1/2 inches). (Oakland Healthy Start video series)

Annotation: This videotape is for new parents and discusses newborn care at home. It covers preparing the home before the baby arrives, normal infant development, and aspects of physical care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Oakland Healthy Start, 1850 Fairway Drive, San Leandro, CA 94577, Telephone: (510) 618-3452 Contact Phone: (510) 639-1246 Fax: (510) 483-6038 Contact E-mail: fhaskins@admin2.mail.co.alameda.ca.us Price unknown.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Household safety, Infant care, Infant development, Infant feeding, Infant health, Videotapes

University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders. n.d.. Former trainee follow-up survey. [Cincinnati, OH]: University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders, 2 items (4 pp., 5 pp.).

Annotation: These forms are a follow up survey of the former participants in the University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders training programs. Theyprovide space to record information about the participants and their comments and assessment of the program. One version is for former trainees with 300+ contact hours; the other is a modified version for trainees with 300+ contact hours who participated in the Interdisciplinary Leadership Core Curriculum since 1987-1988.

Keywords: Developmental disabilities, Evaluation, MCH training, Surveys

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

Nelson R. n.d.. CHSC Parent Partnership Project: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa , 46 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to strengthen family-centered care for Iowa children with special health care needs by expanding parent participation in CHSC services development, by creating a statewide parent consultant network, and by enhancing community opportunities for parents to meet with one another and with professionals in a family-oriented experience. Program plans included an annual statewide issues forum; a regional parent consultant network composed of 2 parents from each of the 13 CHSC service regions; and family enrichment weekends designed to bring together parents and children for discussion, reflection, and recreation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146777.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Parent Networks, Parent-Professional Communication, Parents

Nicol P. n.d.. Coordinated Community-Based Services: [Final report]. Frankfort, KY: Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department for Health Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Human Resources, 39 pp.

Annotation: The principle aim of this project was to demonstrate a coordinated, community-based program model for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of children from birth to five years of age with developmental disabilities, children at risk for them, and for their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152932.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Developmental disorders, Early intervention, Family centered care, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Malach R. n.d.. Case Management for Parents of Indian Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project provided a model program for American Indian families and the professionals who served them. The program goals were to identify cultural, systemic, institutional, and policy barriers that inhibit Native American family participation in the "Western" health care/case management system; improve case management by facilitating effective communication between Native American families and the non-Native American health care professionals who serve them; and increase Native American family participation in health care policy development and planning forums in order to promote changes that improve services for Native American children and families. Activities included developing a videotape illustrating effective cross-cultural communication strategies for non-Indian health care providers and training an Indian parent advocate to help families seen at IHS special pediatric clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158251.

Keywords: American Indians, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Family-Based Health Care, Indian Health Service (IHS), Low income groups, Parents, Rural Population

Benford M. n.d.. MATCH II: A Merged Database for Health and Developmental Disabilities [Final report]. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve coordination and continuity of early intervention and health related services to infants and young children who have, or are at risk for, developmental disabilities or delays. The project developed a collaborative mechanism via computer linkage for referring, tracking, and evaluating these children. A microbased computerized identification, referral, and tracking system has been developed for use at the local level. Through the merged database and tracking system, the project sought to improve child find, service coordination, follow-along, and program evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161974.

Keywords: Case Management, Collaboration of Care, Computer Linkage, Data Bases, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPDST, Early Intervention, Families, High risk infants, Medicaid, Referrals, WIC Program

van Dyck P. n.d.. Methods of Funding Nutrition Services for Children with Developmental Disabilities [Final report]. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and apply a model for providing comprehensive nutrition services for children in Utah who have certain developmental disabilities or disease conditions. The objectives of the project were to (1) provide comprehensive nutrition care and expand resources; (2) demonstrate the costs and benefits of providing nutrition services to those children with selected developmental disabilities using an economic model; and (3) obtain third-party reimbursement for nutrition services provided to children with selected special health needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-199172.

Keywords: Cystic Fibrosis, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Financing Health Care, Inborn Errors of Metabolism, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit(NICU), Nutrition, Reimbursement

Kessel R. n.d.. Diagnostic and Followup Project for Native American Children in Wisconsin with Special Health Care Needs = WINGS Project [Final report]. Madison, WI: Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was part of an ongoing effort to identify and address issues related to developmental disabilities among Native American children in Wisconsin to assure that proper diagnostic and followup services are provided to this population. Tribes, State and local agencies, and volunteer organizations were involved in a collaborative effort to design and establish a long-term, community-based, high quality program in each tribal community in Wisconsin to serve the special health care needs of Native American children. The two main goals of the project were to: (1) Become an integral part of the tribal service systems, and (2) improve those systems in such a way that they address both the needs of developmentally disabled children and the issues related to the prevention of disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161941.

Keywords: American Indians, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Miller S. n.d.. New Horizons in School Health [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 35 pp.

Annotation: The project provided training experiences to enable health professionals in schools to work together and with school colleagues to provide developmentally appropriate, comprehensive health care. This enhanced the healthy development and academic success of school children. Additionally, the project providef training ot enable school health professionals to serve as effective preceptors for future student professionals. Twenty Maryland schools with school-based health programs established interdisciplinary teams consisting of health and education professionals. Each school-based team identified a health need in its school and designed, implemented, and evaluated a team project. Process evaluation was implemented following key activities. Outcome evaluation focused on outcomes related to specific project objectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121974.

Keywords: Adolescents, Interdisciplinary Approach, Professional Education in Adolescent Health, School Health Programs, State Staff Development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.