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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

Gates A. n.d.. Interagency Home Care Model for Ventilator Assisted Individuals in Louisiana: [Final report]. New Orleans, LA: Children's Hospital, 17 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model for care and services, a services resource network and coordinated education and training resources. The project worked with over 40 families, published a book, Homeward Bound: Resources for Living at Home with a Chronically Ill Child, and produced training videotapes for health care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152957.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Dependence, Home-Based Health Care, Technology, Ventilator Dependence

Perrin J. n.d.. Home Care for Chronically Ill Children: Policy Analysis [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts General Hospital, Wang Ambulatory Care Center, 171 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve the knowledge base from which policymakers and program directors make decisions regarding implementation of community-based and home-based services for children with long-term health care needs. Strategies included a literature review, a review of current innovative home and community-based programs, and the dissemination of findings and recommendations by means of publications and a state-of-the-art conference. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-106358.

Keywords: Children, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Services, Data Collection from, Home-Based Health Care, Primary Care Centers, Technology Dependence

Sherman B. n.d.. Home-Based Support Services for Chronically Ill Children and Their Families [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to demonstrate that a system of reimbursable, cost-effective, home-based support services can be implemented for families with chronically ill children. The project objectives were to facilitate the provision of home-based care for chronically ill children through the following activities: (1) Developing a regional network of medically skilled respite providers; (2) establishing self-help mutual support groups for chronically ill children and their parents and siblings; (3) training professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and (4) disseminating project findings and recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158699.

Keywords: Arthritis, Asthma, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Congenital Heart Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Feeding Disorders, Hemophilia, Home-Based Health Care, Kidney Disease, Leukemia, Low income groups, Muscular Dystrophy, Nurses, Respiratory Technologies, Respite Care, Sick Kids (Need) Involved People (SKIP), Sickle Cell Disease, Support Groups, Tay-Sachs Disease, Ventilator Dependence

Cooper L. n.d.. Demonstration Project to Develop a Pediatric Service Coordination Model [Final report]. Cleveland, OH: MetroHealth Medical Center, 34 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to enable families to provide home-centered care for their special needs children, when home was the best option, by establishing a service delivery system. This system: (1) Promoted the availability and accessibility of comprehensive quality services that address physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and developmental needs; (2) encouraged continuity and coordination of care among all components of the child and family's interdisciplinary team; (3) promoted communication among caregivers; and (4) was reimbursable, accountable, and responsive to changing needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161891.

Keywords: 99-457, Chronically Ill, Coordination of Health Care, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Home-Based Health Care, Interdisciplinary Teams, Interdisciplinary Teams, L, P, Pediatric Care Providers, Technology Dependence

Seabury, H. 2019. In her words: Opioid use disorder and pregnancy. Fort Wayne, IN: McMillen Health, 23 pp. (Community report)

Annotation: This report presents information about opioid use during pregancy. The report provides definitions of terms used, an overview of the problem, the impact of opioid use disorder during pregnancy on infants, interviews with mothers being treated for opioid use disorder, interviews with professionals, and results. The development of an educational intervention is also discussed.

Contact: McMillen Health, 600 Jim Kelley Boulevard, Fort Wayne, IN 46816, Telephone: (888) 240-7268 Secondary Telephone: (260) 456-4511 Web Site: http://mcmillenhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Intervention, Neonatal addiction, Opiates, Pregnant women, Substance abuse, Substance dependence

Oregon Pregnancy and Opioids Workgroup. 2018. Oregon Pregnancy and Opioids Workgroup recommendations. Salem, OR: Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides recommendations for the management of opioid use for pregnant women, including pregnant women with opioid-use disorder, and for care of the opioid-exposed newborn. Topics include clinical recommendations, health-systems and policy recommendations, definitions, and resources and collaborative approaches.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, 500 Summer Street, N.E., E-20, Salem, OR 97301-1097, Telephone: (503) 947-2340 Secondary Telephone: (877) 398-9238 Fax: (503) 947-2341 E-mail: OHPBinfo@state.or.us Web Site: http://www.oregon.gov/oha Available from the website.

Keywords: Narcotics, Oral health, Oregon, Pregnant women, Prescription drugs, State programs, Substance abuse, Substance dependence

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Medicaid coverage of medication-assisted treatment for alcohol and opioid use disorders and of medication for the reversal of opioid overdose. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report presents summary information on Medicaid coverage and financing of medications to treat alcohol and opioid use disorders (MAT). It discusses issues including prior authorization, innovative approaches to financing and delivering MAT, state considerations for covering MAT (including efficacy, costs, regulations, and policies), and innovative models and best practices.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS SMA-18-5093 .

Keywords: Alcohol dependence, Drugs, Health care financing, Medicaid, Opiates, Substance abuse treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Clinical guidance for treating pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder and their infants. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 159 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides guidance for the optimal management of pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder (OUD) and their infants, based on recommendations of experts as of 2017. The guide is designed to help health professionals and women determine the most clinically appropriate action for a particular circumstance. In addition to offering background information, the guide includes fact sheets divided into the following sections: prenatal care, infant care, and maternal postnatal care. Each fact sheet includes a clinical scenario, clinical action steps, supporting evidence and clinical considerations, and links to and descriptions of online resources on the topic.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: (SMA) 18-5054. .

Keywords: Narcotics, Parents, Guidelines, Perinatal addiction, Pregnant women, Prenatal addiction, Substance dependence, Substance use disorders, Treatment

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

Romito L, Mandiwala R. 2014. Tobacco cessation toolkit for Indiana dental practices. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Dental Association, 93 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information on how oral health professionals can develop a tobacco-cessation-intervention program and outlines key roles for each member of the oral health team. Contents include information about tobacco use and prevalence, risks of tobacco use, secondhand smoke, benefits of cessation, nicotine and the physiology of dependence, tobacco-cessation counseling, pharmacotherapy, insurance coverage and coding, the role of dentists and the dental team, barriers and solutions, and resources.

Contact: Indiana Dental Association, 1319 East Stop 10 Road, Indianapolis, IN 46227, Telephone: (317) 634-2610 Secondary Telephone: (800) 562-5646 Fax: (317) 634-2612 E-mail: jhawke@indental.org Web Site: http://www.indental.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Barriers, Counseling, Dental care, Drug dependence, Health insurance, Indiana, Intervention, Nicotine, Oral health, Program development, Reimbursement, Role, Smoking cessation, State programs, Tobacco use

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. 2011. Adolescent substance use: America's no. 1 public health problem. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 406 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about adolescent alcohol consumption and substance abuse, including the abuse of prescription drugs and illegal drugs. The report explains the problem and discusses its magnitude, consequences, messages that promote adolescent substance abuse, adolescent perceptions and expectations,factors that compound or reduce the risk of adolescent substance abuse and addiction, prevention approaches and barriers to improvement, and treatment.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol intoxication, Drug addiction, Health promotion, Mass media, Prevention, Substance abuse, Treatment

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2011. Alcohol screening and brief intervention for youth: A practitioner's guide. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 40 pp.

Annotation: This guide for primary care health professionals provides a simple, empirically derived tool for identifying children and adolescents ages 9-18 at risk for alcohol-related problems. The guide also explains why it is important to screen for such problems and how the tool helps in doing so. A pocket guide and algorithm are also available from the website.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol intoxication, Child attitudes, Adolescent attitudes, Child behavior, Child health, Continuing education, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Intervention, Prevention, Primary care, Screening

Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. 2010. An evaluation of state EPSDT screening tools. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 7 pp. (Protecting consumer rights in public systems' managed mental health care policy; no. 3; )

Annotation: This paper reports on tools in use or under development to identify children's mental health and addiction treatment needs, under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Medicaid mandate. The paper includes a table showing the type of tool used in fifteen states.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Contact Phone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child mental health, Drug affected children, EPSDT, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Substance dependence

University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children. 2010. Guidelines for nurses working in home care. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document is excerpted from the "Home Care Program Policy Manual" of the University of Illinois at Chicago Division of Specialized Care for Children. It describes some of the differences and difficulties experienced by families and nurses working together in the home care of technology assisted children. It also provides information to help nurses establish and maintain a professional working relationship within a home environment. General guidelines are presented to help nurses prepare mentally for the experience of home care. More specific guidelines are also included that discuss establishing appropriate relationships with the child, the parents, and the siblings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children, 3135 Old Jacksonville Road, Springfield, IL 62704-6488, Telephone: (217) 558-2350 Secondary Telephone: (800) 322-3722 Fax: (217) 558-0773 E-mail: dssc@uic.edu Web Site: http://dscc.uic.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Home care services, Medically fragile children, Nurses, Parents, Technology dependence

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Results from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 292 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-28)

Annotation: This report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Overview of findings from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 58 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-27)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

Wright D. 2004. State estimates of substance use from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 140 pp.

Annotation: This report presents state estimates for 20 measures of substance use and mental health problems based on the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an ongoing survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 and older. In addition to a highlights section, the report includes the following main sections: (1) illicit drug use; (2) alcohol use; (3) tobacco use; (4) substance dependence, abuse, and treatment need; (5) serious mental illness among adults; and (6) discussion. Most of the information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: (1) tables of model-based estimates by substance and (2) state estimation methodology. The report also includes a list of references.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 04-3907.

Keywords: Adults, Alcohol use, Drug dependence, Health, Mental Illness, Mental health, Statistics, Substance abuse, Substance dependence, Surveys, Tobacco use, Treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2004. Overview of findings from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 42 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-24)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. A more complete presentation of the initial results of the survey is given in the full report, Results from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings. Both reports present national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental health problems are also included. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2002 and 2003. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; trends in initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; and prevalence and treatment of mental health problems. A discussion is also included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: prevalence estimate tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

Covington SS. 1999. A woman's journal: Helping Women Recover—A program for treating addiction. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 134 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a personal journal to be used by a participant in a program for treating addiction, Helping Women Recover. The journal is intended for use in a group meeting setting although it may be used one-on-one with a counselor. The program is organized into four modules: self, relationships, sexuality, and spirituality. For each module, the journal contains exercises to be used at the group meetings, summaries of information received at meetings, and questions and exercise for reflection between meetings. The appendix contains a list of other recovery resources.

Contact: Jossey-Bass Publishers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.JosseyBass.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7879-4430-0.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Personal narratives, Recovering addicts, Substance dependence, Therapeutic programs, Women's health

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care. 1998. The Healing Place: Strategy transfer guide—Models that work. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 27 pp.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.