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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2018. HHS strategic plan and Secretary's strategic initiatives: Strategic plan FY 2018–2022. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, multiple items.

Annotation: This strategic plan provides priorities, accomplishments, and next steps that are tracked and updated frequently, reinforcing the strategic plan’s function as a living, vital document that serves a genuine management purpose. The plan addresses 5 strategic goals: (1) reform, strengthen, and modernize the nation's healthcare system; (2) protect the health of Americans where they live, learn, work, and play; (3) strengthen the economic and social well-being of Americans across the lifespan; (4) foster sound, sustained advances in the sciences; and (5) promote effective and efficient management and stewardship.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal agencies, Strategic plans, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Butler AS, Clayton EW, eds; Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the HHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program; Institute of Medicine. 2009. A review of the HHS Family Planning Program: Mission, management, and measurement of results. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 468 pp., brief (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report examines the goals, management and administration, and program evaluation system of theTitle X family planning program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Family planning programs, Federal programs, Program evaluation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2007. Strategic plan FY 2007-2012. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 189 pp.

Annotation: This report describes U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) goals and strategies to improve health care, promote and protect the public's health, enhance human services, advance the research and development in its fields, and address emerging health threats to the United States. Appendices include program evaluations, performance indicators, plans, and organizational descriptions.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal agencies, Health objectives, Public health services, Strategic plans, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2004. Strategic plan FY 2004-2009. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 193 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic outcome goals and objectives for investment in accomplishing the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) mission to protect and improve the health and well-being of the American public for fiscal years 2004-2009. Goals include (1) reduce the major threats to the health and well-being of Americans; (2) enhance the ability of the nation's health care system to effectively respond to bioterrorism and other public health challenges; (3) increase the percentage of the nation's children and adults to have access to health care services, and expand consumer choices; (4) enhance the capacity and productivity of the nation's health science research enterprise; (5) improve the quality of health care services; (6) improve the economic and social well-being of individuals, families, and communities, especially those most in need; (7) improve the stability and healthy development of our nation's children and youth; and (8) achieve excellence in management practices. The introduction provides background information on the Department of Health and Human Services, the development of this plan, and a description of the mission, vision, goals, and core values of the department. The goals section provides detail on the strategies for accomplishing goals and objectives. The appendices include performance plan linage and success indicators, coordination elements, external factors, data challenges and responses, program evaluations, resources supporting the plan, a schedule for initiating actions, management tools used in support of program goals, the department's organization, and a matrix of programs that support HHS strategic objectives.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal agencies, Federal programs, Health objectives, National programs, Public health services, Strategic plans

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Child welfare: Most states are developing statewide information systems, but the reliability of child welfare data could be improved. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the following issues: (1) states' experiences in developing child welfare information systems and the Department of Health and Human Services' (DHHS') role in assisting in their development, (2) factors that affect the reliability of data that states collect and report on children served by their welfare agencies, and DHHS's role in ensuring the reliability of those data, and (3) practices that child welfare agencies use to overcome challenges associated with the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System's (SACWIS's) development and data reliability. Four appendices include the scope and methodology, state SACWIS stages of development, comments from DHHS, and General Accounting Office (GAO) contacts and acknowledgments. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a bibliography and a list of related GAO products.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-809.

Keywords: Child welfare agencies, Data, Data collection, Department of Health and Human Services, Information systems

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1998. PIC briefing book: Racial and ethnic health disparities in maternal and child health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf binder is a collection of articles and reports on health disparities faced by minority children and families. It addresses the priority areas selected by the Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and suggests roles for the maternal and child health community in this effort. The contents discuss current U.S. Department of Health and Human Services initiatives; race, ethnicity, and pregnancy outcomes; the health status of minority children; access to care; health disparities for adolescents; cultural competence; race and ethnicity data; and the history and future of health care for minority children and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health services, Child health, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Data, Department of Health and Human Services, Ethnic factors, Families, Health status, Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health, MCH programs, Minority health, Pregnancy outcome, Race

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Health and Human Services: Opportunities to realize savings. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 16 pp.

Annotation: This testimony describes how the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) could reduce expenditures through greater administrative efficiencies, reducing ineffective programs, targeting funds to maintain essential administrative functions, and developing program evaluation strategies and modern information systems to determine whether programs work. Appendices list major program activities within HHS, and grant programs by subject area (maternal and child health, child welfare, narcotics/drugs, and employment).

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/T-HEHS-95-57.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Federal agencies, Financial management, S, U

Hutchins VL. 1994. History of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: A presentation to the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 videotape.

Annotation: This VHS videotape of Dr. Vince L. Hutchins' brown bag presentation at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health gives an overview of the history of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Dr. Hutchins discusses the cycles of funding for maternal and child health issues over eight decades and the impact that socioeconomic factors have had on MCH program development. Discussion after the presentation focuses on the potential effects of health care reform on maternal and child health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Children's Bureau, Early intervention services, Federal MCH programs, Federal grants, Federal programs, Health care reform, History, Legislation, Maternal health, Social factors, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Videotapes

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Child welfare: HHS begins to assume leadership to implement national and state systems. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes steps the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has taken to provide guidance to states in developing a nationwide adoption and foster care data collection system. Included in the report is a model child welfare information system developed by a work group of several states and DHHS. The system is more comprehensive than the functional requirements established by DHHS.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/AIMD-94-37.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare, Federal agencies, Foster care, Information systems, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 1994. Moving forward: Continuous improvement in the Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the Department of Health and Human Services' first year's accomplishments in its Continuous Improvement Program (CIP). It addresses strategic planning, delegating and delayering, cutting paperwork and controls, information technology, responding to partners and customers, working cooperatively, taking risks and experimenting, and streamlining.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Federal agencies, Quality assurance, Strategic plans

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1992. Child abuse: Prevention programs need greater emphasis. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 83 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews a variety of child abuse prevention programs, their effectiveness and describes funding or other obstacles to wider implementation. GAO studied primary prevention programs in 8 states considered to be the leaders in the field: California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Oregon, and Washington. GAO visited 27 program sites, interviewed officials from 7 others that pulled in four additional states: Maryland, Colorado, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Some of the programs visited are summarized. In-depth discussion of programs in Hawaii and Elmira, New York is presented in the appendices, as is a list of all programs contacted by GAO. GAO found that federal funding for prevention is most often via short term grants, and only one state had its own statewide prevention program. The report compares this status to the federal costs paid for assistance to children after the abuse has occurred. The GAO recommendations and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services response are presented.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HRD-92-99.

Keywords: Child abuse, Community programs, Data, Department of Health and Human Services, Evaluation, Financing, Government Accounting Office, Injury prevention, Intervention, Monitoring, Prevention, Public policy, S, S, State plans, U, U

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary. 1991. Healthy kids: Improving health care for infants and children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, 14 items.

Annotation: This 14-piece public information kit describes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' programs designed to improve the health of infants and children. Information is included on the following topics: Head Start; school readiness; immunizations; adoption; infant mortality; child abuse and neglect; early health testing; tobacco; lead poisoning; injury prevention; disabled children; and, alcohol and other drug abuse. Contact persons and their phone numbers are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Contact Phone: (202) 690-7047 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Out of print; contact organization for further information.

Keywords: Adoption, Alcohol, Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Children with special health care needs, Drug abuse, EPSDT, Head Start, Health screening, Immunization, Infant health, Infant mortality, Injury prevention, Lead poisoning, School readiness, Tobacco, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Ginsburg S, Schmidt RE. 1989. An inventory of resources and activities devoted to dental and oral health in the Department of Health and Human Services. Bethesda, MD: Richard Schmidt Associates, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of the Comprehensive Inventory of Dental and Oral Health Activities within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) project. The report is intended mainly for use as input data for the deliberations of a committee established for the purpose of preparing a report to Congress. The report provides (1) background information and a context for considering oral health goals and objectives as well as changes in federal oral health initiatives and activities, (2) an historical overview of the organization and nature of oral health-related activities in DHHS, (3) a review of oral health activities based on the 1988 DHHS-wide inventory and supplemented by other written documents and phone contacts, and (4) a comparison of current oral health activities with those identified in prior studies. An appendix includes survey instruments and attachments.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Federal initiatives, Health objectives, Oral health, Reports, Research, Resource materials, Surveys

National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality. 1988. A historic day for children. Washington, DC: National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality, 3 v.

Annotation: This program lists the events for the Corporate Summit for Children and provides brief biographies of the speakers. The program supplement offers a historical overview of federal initiatives to reduce infant mortality and a description of several public programs and activities that have contributed significantly to improving the health of mothers and children over the years. Secondly, the document contains biographical sketches of all former secretaries of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Health and Human Services. Finally, the winning essays on child health from a parent teacher association contest are included. An accompanying document consists of remarks by Carol Evans.

Keywords: Biographies, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal MCH programs, History, Infant mortality, Meetings, Prevention programs

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 1984. Nutrition activities of the Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office , 42 pp.

Annotation: This volume chronicles the scope of the nutrition efforts of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) in the areas of nutrition research, nutrition services, nutrition education, nutrition status monitoring, food safety and quality, and international nutrition concerns.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Contact Phone: (202) 472-5308 Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Price unknown. Document Number: DHHS 83-50203.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Food safety, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, Nutrition services

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1980. Better management and more resources needed to strengthen federal efforts to improve pregnancy outcome. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 214 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the progress made and problems remaining in government efforts to reduce infant mortality and morbidity. It discusses the need for more intense and coordinated efforts by Federal agencies, particularly the Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare and Agriculture, to help alleviate remaining problems. The report also recommends several legislative changes to improve Federal programs affecting pregnancy outcome. Further, it discusses the need for additional resources for areas in the Nation continuing to experience significant adverse pregnancy outcomes that could be improved if mothers and infants had better access to appropriate health care.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Access to prenatal care, Department of Agriculture, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal legislation, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, Pregnancy outcome, Reports

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 1972. Responsibility and responsiveness: The HEW potential for the seventies. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 31 pp.

Weckwerth VE. 1972. Constructing a national strategy of health care for children. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 24 pp. (Comment series no.: 2-11 (44))

Annotation: This is a working paper from which a report produced at the request of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) to examine existing federal programs within HEW providing health care services to children was written. The initiative behind the report is the lack of a federal strategy for health care for children as enabling funding for federal MCH programs ends in June, 1973. The report was formally submitted to HEW and is subject to their release. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal MCH programs, Title V programs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.