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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (74 total).

National Council of La Raza. (2013). Latino Kids Data Explorer. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza,

Annotation: This database is a user-friendly tool that provides data on Latino children in the United States. As an update and expansion of NCLR’s 2010 publication America’s Future: Latino Child Well-Being in Numbers and Trends, the Data Explorer offers 27 national- and state-level indicators of Latino child well-being, including demographic, health, education, housing, income, and juvenile justice variables. The data are available by age group (0–2, 0–4, 0–8, 0–17) and include time trend and racial/ethnic comparisons.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Data, Demography, Hispanic Americans, Juvenile justice, Socioeconomic status

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2012. Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system report on CDC's winnable battles: Collecting data in order to improve the health of mothers and infants. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 10 files.

Annotation: This website presents information on public health challenges contributing to causes of death and disability considered to be "winnable battles." Topics include collecting data on maternal demographics; HIV in the U.S.; motor vehicle injuries; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; breastfeeding (as part of nutrition); teen pregnancy; and tobacco. A brief description of each topic is provided along with snapshot reports.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Data collection, Demography, HIV, Maternal health, Motor vehicle injuries, Nutrition, Breastfeeding, Obesity, Physical activity, Population surveillance, Public health, Tobacco use

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Immigrant children. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 266 pp. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 1, Spring 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines the well-being of immigrant children and what can be done to improve their education attainment, health, social and cognitive development, and long-term prospects for economic mobility. The issue discusses demographic trends, family arrangements, educational trends and differentials, health status, social integration, and participation in welfare and other public programs. Policies to improve the well-being of immigrant chldren are also presented.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-6-6.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Cognitive development, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Health, Immigrants, Public policy, Trends, Welfare

North Dakota Department of Health. 2010. Affordable Care Act (ACA) Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program needs assessment: Supplemental information request for the submission of the statewide needs assessment. Bismarck, ND: North Dakota Department of Health, 86 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment offers an overview of key performance indicators used to identify communities in greatest need of a home visiting program in North Dakota. After describing the approach taken and the framework used, the needs assessment discusses the demographics in the state of North Dakota, including population shifts between 1870 and 2009; looks at economic conditions (including the labor force, wages, and poverty levels); shifting household composition, births (including preterm and low birthweight), and infant mortality. The assessment also looks at domestic violence, child maltreatment, physical and sexual violence, high school dropout levels, substance abuse (including drug and tobacco use), and crime. Included is a review of the North Dakota Head Start needs assessment and a detailed summary of findings. Tables and maps compare findings across counties and regions.

Contact: North Dakota Department of Health, 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Bismarck, ND 58505, Telephone: (701) 328-2372 Fax: (701) 328-4727 Web Site: http://www.ndhealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Women's health, Adolescent health, Child health, Demography, Health care reform, Home visiting, Measures, Needs assessment, North Dakota, Outcome evaluation, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State MCH programs

Sinatra C. 2010. To improve wellbeing in children, state policy matters most. Austin, TX: Texans Care for Children, 3 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief examines the policy issues that may contribute to the low ranking of child well-being in the state of Texas, compared with other states. It includes a summary of findings from the report published in 2008 by the Every Child Matters Education Fund which ranked Texas 46th in overall child wellbeing, and examines the key indicators and their relationship to policy issues that contribute to the rankings. The brief summarizes key findings from the analysis and calls on federal and state lawmakers to support policies that improve child health outcomes.

Contact: Texans Care for Children, 811 Trinity, Suite A, Austin, TX 78701, Telephone: (512) 473-2274 Fax: (512) 473-2173 E-mail: http://texanscareforchildren.org/EmailUs.asp Web Site: http://www.texanscareforchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Demography, Health care, Health statistics, Legislation, Measures, Policy analysis, Policy development, State programs, Texas

Stagner M, Goerge R, Ballard P. 2009. Improving indicators of child well-being. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 21 pp.

Annotation: This paper follows from discussion at a symposium on child indicators in which experts debated the current state of federal indicators and considered new indicators in line with priorities of the new presidential administration. This paper examines the data collection programs of, and makes recommendations for, improvements in three indicator areas: early childhood and the transition to school, the transition from secondary school to adulthood, and the context in which children live.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN: 1097-3125.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Data collection, Demography, Information sources, Measures, Statistics, Youth

Kugler EG. 2009. Partnering with parents and families to support immigrant and refugee children at school. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 15 pp. (Issue brief no. 2)

Annotation: This paper summarizes how the recent influx of immigrant and refugee children has changed the dynamics of classrooms in America, describes the impact of the refugee and immigration experience on students, and examines the role of the family and how to partner with families for improved student mental health. It also presents summary descriptions of 15 model programs developed by the Caring Across Communities grant initiatives.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Demography, Families, Family school relations, Mental health, Migrants, Model programs, School age children, School role

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

WWAMI Rural Health Research Center. 2008. Poor birth outcome in the rural United States: 1985-1987 to 1995-1997. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Rural Health Research Center, 12 pp. (Final report #119)

Annotation: This national study examines rural vs. urban, remote vs. less remote rural, rural in poverty vs. rural not in poverty differences in low birthweight, neonatal mortality, and post neonatal mortality, and inadequate prenatal care between 1985 and 1997.

Contact: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Box 354982, Seattle, WA 98195-4982, Telephone: (206) 685-0402 Fax: (206) 616-4768 E-mail: rhrc@fammed.washington.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/uwrhrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Demography, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Neonatal mortality, Statistics

Bates T, Chapman S. 2008. Diversity in California's health professions: Dentistry. [San Francisco, CA]: University of California, San Francisco, Center for Health Professions, 5 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents data describing key characteristics of the dentistry labor force in California including age, gender, race/ethnicity, and income. Trends in the gender and race/ethnicity of first-year enrollments in California's five dentistry programs are also described.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Healthforce Center for Research and Leadership Development, 3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-8181 E-mail: healthforcecenter@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://healthforce.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Data, Demography, Dentistry, Oral health, Professional personnel, State surveys, Work force

Lambert D, Ziller EC, Lenardson JD. 2008. Use of mental health service by rural children. [Portland, ME]: Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report, based on data from the National Survey of America's Families, examines rural-urban differences in children's mental health service use, and which factors may mediate or reduce such differences. Areas examined include: (1) What is the mental health need of children, age 6 to 17? (2) What percentage of children, with an identified mental health need, used a mental health service in the past year? (3) What role does family income and type of insurance have on the use of mental health services by children?

Contact: Muskie School of Public Service, , P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104, Telephone: (207) 780-4430 Fax: (207) 780-4060 E-mail: Web Site: http://usm.maine.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Medicaid, Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Demography, Insurance, National surveys, Public policy, Rural environment, Socioeconomic factors, State Children's Health Insurance Program

National Center for Health Statistics. 2007. Tracking Healthy People 2010 (rev.). Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics,

Annotation: This electronic resource is designed to serve as a statistical compendium companion to the November 2000 publication of Healthy People 2010 - Understanding and Improving Health - Objectives for Improving Health. The information on data issues, technical specifications, and major data sources reflect changes since November 2000. In addition, the data issues section includes new components on the midcourse review overview, measuring quality and years of healthy life, and measuring health disparities. The technical specifications of the objectives will be updated periodically as specifications change throughout the decade.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Community role, Data, Demography, Disease prevention, Goals, Health objectives, Health policy, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Population surveillance, Program management, Public health, Statistics

James C, Thomas M, Lillie-Blanton M. 2007. Key facts: Race, ethnicity, and medical care. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report provides quick reference on racial/ethnic disparities in health, health insurance coverage, and health care access and quality. It highlights the available data and research, providing a selective review of the literature. Section I gives an overview of the demographics of the U.S. population. Section II presents measures of health status. Section III profiles patterns of health insurance coverage. Section IV describes findings on the use of preventive and primary care. Section five discusses specialty care issues in diabetes, HIV.AIDS, and asthma. Section six dsicusses tracking changes in quality and access disparities. Data are presented in figures throughout the chartbook. The report concludes with data notes and a bibliography.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Demography, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Health services, Minority groups, Primary care, Racial factors

Wilson AA, Aye D, Beazaglou T, Fleissner M, Lee MA, Madonna C, Mentasi L, Mitchell M, Mueller M, Shah A, Stone C, Sorosiak D. 2007. Oral health in Connecticut. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Public Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the oral health status of residents and provides an overview of what is known about the state of oral health issues in Connecticut. The report provides a summary of key findings and discusses state demographics, oral health status, risk and protective factors, and work force and access. The report is a companion document to the Connecticut Oral Health Improvement Plan for 2007-2012 and is intended to provide baseline data on the oral health of Connecticut residents to promote interventions and policies and facilitate monitoring of oral disease trends and improvements to residents' oral health.

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Health, P.O. Box 340308, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-7382 Fax: (860) 509-7853 E-mail: linda.ferraro@ct.gov Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph/cwp/view.asp?a=3125&q=388844&dphNav_GID=1601 Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Connecticut, Demography, Dental caries, Health status, Oral health, Protective factors, Risk factors, State programs, Statistical data, Work force

Goerge RM, Dilts J, Yang D, Wasserman M, Clary A. 2007. Chicago children and youth 1990-2010: Changing population trends and their implications for services. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report draws on demographic data to examine and project trends in the size and composition of the child population in 77 Chicago communities up to the year 2010. The report highlights the changing age mix of Chicago children and provides some context in which to consider these demographic trends. The report describes population changes across Chicago communities and identifies communities in which more or fewer children are living in poverty. The report also explores the implications of the changes, trends, and projections for social services, schools, and early childhood education and after-school programs. Finally, it offers some conclusions to help government and program planners build capacity to respond to ongoing change. The report includes an abstract. Statistical information is presented in figures, tables, and maps throughout the report.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communities, Demography, Early childhood education, Poverty, School age child care, Schools, Social services, Statistical data, Trends

Georgia Department of Human Resources, Family Health Branch. 2006. The status of Georgia's children: Ages five through nine. [Atlanta, GA]: Georgia Department of Human Resources, Family Health Branch, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about the health conditions and concerns of Georgia's children ages 5-9. The report provides key demographics for Georgia's 622,129 children in this age group and discusses the group's access to health care. The report also highlights gaps in knowledge and research about middle childhood, points out significant problem areas, describes best practices, and outlines areas for assessment and further evaluation to ensure that Georgia's children ages 5-9 are healthy, able to achieve in school, and able to reach their maximum potential later in life. The report dscusses several key concerns for children in this age group, including asthma, oral health, and overweight and obesity. Next steps are included. The report also includes references and source documents and one appendix: 40 developmental assets for middle childhood.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Asthma, Child development, Child health, Children, Demography, Georgia, Obesity, Oral health, School readiness

Andrilla CHA, Lishner DM, Hart LG. 2006. Rural dental practice: A tale of four states. Seattle, WA: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, 13 pp., plus appendices. (Working paper no.107)

Annotation: This working paper reports the findings of a study investigating rural dentist issues, such as demography, training, practice characteristics, staff, and job satisfaction, in Alabama, California, Maine, and Missouri. The paper highlights the survey methodology, findings, and limitations and discusses responses to issues including work and staffing patterns, vacancy rates, Medicaid participation, and job satisfaction of rural dentists. Perspectives of oral health professionals on issues related to access to care are also discussed. Appendices provide the survey questionnaire for each state, plus state pamphlets presenting statistical data of individual state findings. A summary is also available as a separate document. The summary presents a project overview and provides charts and statistics on dentist demographics, dental hygienist and dental assistant vacancy rates, and dentist participation in Medicaid.

Contact: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Box 354982, Seattle, WA 98195-4982, Telephone: (206) 685-0402 Fax: (206) 616-4768 E-mail: rhrc@fammed.washington.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/uwrhrc Available from the website.

Keywords: State surveys, Access to health care, Alabama, California, Children, Demography, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Job satisfaction, Maine, Missouri, Oral health, Professional training, Provider participation, Questionnaires, Rural environment, Statistical data, Surveys, Work force

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. 2005. Rural children at a glance. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 6 pp. (Economic information bulletin; no. 1)

Annotation: This report provides information on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of rural children and families. The report includes an overview of rural children and discusses the increasing diversity of today's child population in rural areas, the decline in child poverty between 1990 and 2000, and indicators of child well-being that differ by metro and non-metro status. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: :Poverty, Children, Cultural diversity, Demography, Economic factors, Families, Rural population, Social factors, Trends

Osborne C, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J . 2005. Young children's behavioral problems in married and cohabitating families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 4 pp. (Fragile families research brief; no. 33)

Annotation: This research brief examines the behavior of children born to married and cohabiting parents in stable unions to determine whether marital status at birth is associated with behavior problems at age 3. If differences in child behavior exist between stably married and cohabiting families, the authors examine what proportion of problems is due to differences in parents' demographic characteristics, economic resources, relationship quality, health, and health behaviors. The authors also compare children born to cohabiting parents who marry after the child's birth with children born to cohabiting parents who remain in cohabiting relationships. The brief presents data and methods, results, and a conclusion and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Demography, Economic factors, Families, Health, Health behavior, Marriage, Parents, Relationships, Single parents, Young children

Cohen DA. 2005. Neighborhood conditions and health disparities: Do neighborhood conditions contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health and health service utilization?. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2002-2005 project in Los Angeles, CA to examine several neighborhood structural variables (such as age, race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender), to determine if they are associated with social processes, with individual level health risk behaviors, with health care utilization and with population level health outcomes. Report sections include an executive summary; a description of the nature of the research, the purpose, scope and methods of investigation, and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature, the study design and methods; and the presentation of findings. Additional sections discuss the findings and provide information on products produced during the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Demography, Ethnic factors, Final reports, Health behavior, Health care utilization, MCH research, Neighborhoods, Public health, Racial factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.