Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (57 total).

Utah Children. 2016. Measures of child well-being in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Children, annual.

Annotation: This annual statistical summary provides information on the health, education, safety, and economic security of children in Utah. The introduction includes general demographic information about the state and presents a long-range view of what factors contribute to a family's well-being. Analytical essays are included for each category of data reviewed and the statistics are presented in tables by county with state totals. This publication continues "Key Facts," which was published between 1990 and 1994.

Contact: Voices for Utah Children, 747 East South Temple, Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, Telephone: (801) 364-1182 Secondary Telephone: (877) 445-2447 Fax: (801) 364-1186 E-mail: karen@utahchildren.org Web Site: http://www.utahchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child safety, Children, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Health status, Socioeconomic factors, Utah

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, The INFO Project. 2014. A user's guide to Popline keywords. (10th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, The INFO Project, irregular.

Annotation: This thesaurus contains the vocabulary used to index and search the POPulation information onLINE database, POPLINE, the world's largest database of population, family planning, and related health issues information, both published and unpublished, containing over 300, 000 citations with abstracts available both online and in CD-ROM format. The thesaurus comprises an alphabetic listing of POPLINE keywords, showing the hierarchies for each term and a permuted display of the terms.

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 111 Market Place, Suite 310, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 659-6300 Fax: (410) 659-6266 E-mail: info@jhuccp.edu Web Site: http://www.jhuccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Demographics, Family planning, Population, Thesauri

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 2014. Children in nonparental care: Findings from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 14 pp.

Annotation: This research brief provides an analysis of data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health to describe children living in nonparental care. Contents include information about the analytic methods, findings, discussion, and limitations. Topics include demographics and household characteristics, income and program participation, health and health care, school engagement and academic performance, caregiver well-being and neighborhood characteristics, and adverse family experiences. Data are presented by caregiver type (two biological parents; one biological parent, step, or adoptive parent; and no biological, step or adoptive parents).

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Children, Demographics, National surveys, Research, Statistical data

Kids Count in Delaware. 2013. Kids Count in Delaware issue brief: Oral health. Newark, DE: Kids Count in Delaware, 8 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief examines and describes oral health, focusing on children in Delaware. Topics include demographics, tooth decay, preventive care, young children needing treatment, oral health care during pregnancy, access to care, and preventive measures such as fluoridated water and dental sealants. The brief concludes with a discussion about assessing progress and improving children’s oral health.

Contact: Kids Count in Delaware, University of Delaware, Center for Community Research and Service, 297 Graham Hall, Newark, DE 19716, Telephone: (302) 831-6780 Fax: (302) 831-4225 E-mail: kids-count@udel.edu Web Site: http://www.ccrs.udel.edu/kids-count Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Delaware, Demographics, Dental care, Disease prevention, Oral health, Pregnant women, School age children, State initiatives, Statistical data, Young children

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative. 2013. Who are children with special health care needs? (rev.). Portland, OR: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet defines children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and presents a statistical profile of CSHCN based on national survey data. Topics include the prevalence of CSHCN, health issues and functional difficulties that CSHCN experience, health care access and quality, and home and school indices. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: https://childhealthdata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children with special health care needs: Statistical data, Demographics

Wides C, Bates T, Mertz E. 2011. Registered dental hygienists in alternative practice in California, 2009 descriptive report. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Center for the Health Professions, 29 pp.

Annotation: The report looks at the Registered Dental Hygienist in Alternative Practice (RDHAP) model of care delivery in California. The content is derived from data collected by a 2009 survey of all 244 RDHAPs licensed in California. Topics include demographics, education, professional activities, practice data (patients, settings, and finances), as well as issues of professional development and advancement.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Healthforce Center for Research and Leadership Development, 3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-8181 E-mail: healthforcecenter@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://healthforce.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Demographics, Dental hygienists, Oral health, Professional education, State surveys, Work force

Fortuny K, Capps R, Simms M, Chaudry A. 2009. Children of immigrants: National and state characteristics. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 18 pp. (Perspectives on low-income working families, brief 9)

Annotation: This report describes characteristics of children of immigrants such as concentration and dispersal, ethnicity, and risk and protective factors at the national and state level based on 2005 and 2006 American Community Survey data. It assesses the impact of this group on public services.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Demographics, Immigrants, Statistics

Kutner M, Greenberg E, Jim Y, Paulsen C. 2006. The health literacy of America's adults: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between health literacy and various self-reported background factors. The report examines how health literacy varies across groups with different demographic characteristics as well as the relationship between health literacy and highest level of educational attainment and poverty status, and it explores the relationship between literacy and overall health. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report includes five appendices: (1) a sample health literacy assessment questionnaire, (2) definitions of all subpopulations and background variables reported, (3) technical notes, (4) standard errors for tables and figures, and (5) additional analyses. References are included.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Demographics, Education, Health, Health literacy, Limited English speakers, Low income groups, Poverty, Racial factors

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2004–. America's children in brief: Key national indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, biennial.

Annotation: This series of briefs summarize select national indicators of children's well-being and changes in these indicators over time. Each brief describes the context in which children live (such as family settings and living arrangements), improvements in children's well-being, and areas in which there has been less progress. Topics include family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures throughout the report, and additional data are available from the website. The series is published biennially as a companion to America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-being, which is published in alternating years. A summary of all indicators in the larger report are included in each brief.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Demographics, Family characteristics, Statistics, Trends

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 2004-. Child maltreatment, __: Reports from the states to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, annual.

Annotation: This annual report synthesizes information provided by state child protective service agencies to the federally mandated National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). It reviews the background of the data collection process; analyzes the national child abuse and neglect data for the year being covered; considers the detailed case data component of NCANDS with examples of some of the types of analyses that can be made of the data; and discusses future directions. Data gathered include: age, sex, race or ethnic group of victims, types of abuse, case dispositions and descriptive information on perpetrators. Appendices contain listings for state advisory group representatives, summary data component tables, and state responses to the summary data component and state comments. This report was previously published under the title: "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 1: 1990 Summary Data Component, " and "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 2: 1991 Summary Data Component."

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Crime, Data collection, Demographics, Emotional abuse, Federal programs, National data, Sexual assault, State data reports, State surveys, Statistics

Moore KA. [2000]. Building a better system of child and family indicators. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief highlights eight key strategies as a means for creating improved indicators for child and family well-being. Also included is a summary of the five different purposes for how these indicators are used and the criteria for indicators of child well-being.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Children, Demographics, Family characteristics, Statistics

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 1997–2017. America's children: Key national indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, annual through 2003; biennial 2005 and later.

Annotation: This series of reports summarize national indicators of children's well-being and changes in these indicators over time. Each volume spotlights critical data gaps and challenges and includes data source descriptions. Successive reports incorporate modifications reflecting efforts to improve quality and comprehensiveness. In alternate years America's Children in Brief (through 2012) or At a Glance (for 2014) are published.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Demographics, Family characteristics, Statistics, Trends

Renaud M, Kresse E, Haywood M. 1997. Profiles of activities to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV: Assessing the response. Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors, 115 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the responses of seven health care provider sites to the findings by a pediatric AIDS trial clinic that the drug zidovudine (ZDV), also known as AZT, can reduce perinatal transmission of HIV by as much as two thirds when administered to women during pregnancy and delivery to infants for six weeks after birth. It identifies the range of strategies and activities undertaken and also sheds lights on contextual factors that affected the responses and addresses their implications.

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHJ097.

Keywords: Assessment, Demographics, Evaluation, High risk pregnancy, Infant health promotion, Maternal health, Pediatric AIDS, Pediatric HIV, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Public health, Risk prevention, Socioeconomic factors, Zidovudine

Kochanek TT, Costa CH. 1997. A multi-site, cost analysis study of early intervention services. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Early Childhood Research Institute on Service Utilization, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report conveys the results of a study conducted in three states (North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Colorado) to better understand the cost of services in infant/toddler early intervention programs, and the factors that are associated with annual cost. It begins by looking at the background of similar studies and the methodology for the current one being reviewed. The report breaks down the findings by looking at program income, program expenditures, hourly service provider costs, weekly services, and the range in weekly cost of services.

Keywords: Colorado, Cost effectiveness, Demographics, Early childhood education, Early intervention programs, Early intervention services, Infants with special health care needs, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Toddlers

Lin B-H, Guthrie J, Blaylock JR. 1996. The diets of America's children: Influences of dining out, household characteristics, and nutrition knowledge. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 36 pp. (Agricultural economic report; no. 746)

Annotation: This report uses data from the 1989-91 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and the Diet and Health Knowledge Survey to examine various aspects of children's diets. Topics include whether their food intake varies at different times of the day, whether the source of food away from home influences the nutritional content of meals, and whether nutritional intakes vary by demographic characteristics as well as their meal-planner's nutritional knowledge. The report contains several tables and figures.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Demographics, Dietary assessment, Family characteristics, Food habits, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition surveys, Statistics

Shartrand A. 1996. Supporting Latino families: Lessons from exemplary programs. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project, 2 v.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a study that examined family support programs that successfully serve families in the Latino community in the United States. The report reviews the demographic characteristics of this community and research on their culture and family structure and it considers how these factors affect this group's access to the services they need. The report describes the methodology used to select family support programs for closer analysis, details the facets of those programs that were instrumental in their being able to deliver culturally competent services, and synthesizes the lessons learned. One volume of the report contains the analysis and synthesis, and the second contains detailed profiles of the programs; both volumes include summaries in Spanish.

Contact: Global Family Research Project™, Third Sector New England, 89 South Street, Boston, MA 02111, E-mail: info@GlobalFRP.org Web Site: http://www.GlobalFRP.org Available in libraries. Document Number: FSP no.: Lat.

Keywords: Social services, Access to care, Case studies, Culturally competent services, Demographics, Ethnic factors, Family support services, Hispanic Americans, Social factors, Spanish language materials

Institute for Women's Policy Research. 1996. The status of women in the states: Politics, economics, health, demographics. Washington, DC: Institute for Women's Policy Research, 64 pp.

Annotation: This statistical compilation assesses the status of women at the state level with regard to these topics: political involvement, employment and earnings, economic autonomy, reproductive rights, health and vital statistics, and demographics. It gives baseline data women's advocates can use to improve the condition of women at the state level. The data are presented in various forms: textual summaries, maps, graphs, and tables. Appendices include information on the methodology used, terms and sources, and national resources, among other information.

Contact: Institute for Women's Policy Research, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 301, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-5100 Fax: (202) 833-4362 E-mail: iwpr@iwpr.org Web Site: http://www.iwpr.org $10.00, nonmembers; $8.00, members; price includes shipping and handling; prepayment required. Document Number: ISBN 1-878428-32-2; Item no. R103.

Keywords: Demographics, Employment, Health, Participation, Political systems, Reproductive rights, Salaries, Socioeconomic status, State data, Statistical reference sources, Vital statistics, Women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1996. National pregnancy and health survey: Drug use among women delivering live births: 1992. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of the National Pregnancy and Health Survey which was taken in 1992 to determine the prevalence of substance abuse among women who delivered live-born babies during a 12-month period. The report includes background information, describes the objectives and design of the survey, and presents and discusses the findings. Data on the following categories are included: overall estimates of substance use any time during the pregnancy, including prior to and during the pregnancy; sociodemographic patterns of use; and for specific substances: any illicit drug, marijuana, cocaine, crack cocaine, alcohol, tobacco, and substances used in combination. The report focuses at length on the design, implementation, and reporting procedures used in carrying out the survey.

Keywords: Alcohol, Cocaine, Crack cocaine, Demographics, Illicit drugs, Marijuana, Perinatal health, Prenatal health, Prevalence, Statistics, Substance abuse, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Tobacco, Women

Allegheny County Health Department, Bureau of Policy Development and Assessment. 1996. Women and chronic disease: 25 year trends for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1970–1995. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Health Department, Bureau of Policy Development and Assessment, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews 25-year trends of chronic diseases among women in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, from 1970 to 1995. Data are provided for rates of heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes. Risk factors for each disease are examined. The report discusses overarching factors affecting the health of women and presents a series of action steps and recommendations. Demographic data are divided by age and race. A bibliography is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Pittsburgh/Allegheny & Fayette County Healthy Start, 400 North Lexington Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA Telephone: (412) 247-1000 Secondary Telephone: (412) 247-4009 Contact Phone: (412) 578-8003 Fax: (412) 578-8325 Contact E-mail: 104626@compuserv.com Web Site: http://healthystartpittsburgh.org/ Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Data analysis, Demographics, Pittsburgh Healthy Start, Risk factors, Risk prevention, Statistics, Trends, Women's health

Miller RH, Hillman JM, Marseille E, Miller EE, Luft HS. 1996. NIHCM health care system datasource. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management, 603 pp.

Annotation: This statistical summary provides a broad range of data from many sources on health care systems and on those who use them, pay for them, provide services within them, or make policy relating to them. The introduction describes the organization, the purpose, and the use of the book; detailed data are provided for states and metropolitan statistical areas for a broad array of subjects. Sample topics on those using health systems include: population, race, age, family characteristics, personal income, birth rates, perinatal care, fetal mortality, low birthweight babies, vaccination, unemployment, and other health conditions. Selected topics on paying for health services are: insurance status and source; health maintenance organization data on enrollment, penetration, number of plans, competition, and participation by household. Some of the topics on providing health services are: hospital capacity, utilization, and expenses; number of beds; physician, nursing, and physician service expenditures; and expenditures for dental, home health, drug and medical nondurables, vision, and nursing home care and other institutional services. Examples of state data on the development of policy affecting health services include: insurance reform, coverage for targeted populations, Medicaid waivers, managed care related statutes, and cost containment efforts.

Keywords: Demographics, Health care systems, Health insurance, Health insuring organizations, Health maintenance organizations, Health services, Health statistics, Medicaid, Medicare, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, State data, Statistics

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.