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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (101 total).

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

Paniagua FA. 2014. Assessing and treating culturally diverse clients: A practical guide [4th ed]. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 391 pp. (Multicultural aspects of counseling series; v. 4)

Annotation: This book defines concepts and provides general guidelines for assessing and treating multicultural populations and provides specific guidelines for populations of African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians. It also deals with issues of prevention, epidemiology, and guidelines for accurately interpreting data from culturally biased measures.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available in libraries. Document Number: Item No. 54964.

Keywords: Assessment, Cultural barriers, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Ethnic groups, Evaluation, Outreach, Patient care, Therapeutics, Training materials

American Association of Public Health Dentistry and American Board of Dental Public Health. 2014. Competency statements for dental public health: Preamble (rev.). Portland, OR: American Association of Public Health Dentistry; Gainesville, FL: American Board of Dental Public Health, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document describes competencies for dental public health and the performance indicators by which they can be measured. Contents include background on the development of the competencies, definitions,and what a specialist in dental public health will do. Topics include planning oral health programs for populations; selecting interventions and strategies for the prevention and control of oral diseases and promotion of oral health; developing resources and implementing and managing oral health programs for populations; incorporating ethical standards in oral health programs and activities; evaluating and monitoring dental care delivery systems; designing and understanding the use of surveillance systems to monitor oral health; communicating and collaborating with groups and individuals on oral health issues; advocating for, implementing, and evaluating public health policy, legislation, and regulations to protect and promote the public's oral health; critiquing and synthesizing scientific literature; and designing and conducting population-based studies to answer oral and public health questions.

Contact: American Association of Public Health Dentistry, P.O. Box 7317, Springfield, IL 62791-7317, Telephone: (217) 529-6941 Fax: (217) 529-9120 E-mail: info@aaphd.org Web Site: http://www.aaphd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Advocacy, Collaboration, Communication skills, Competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Dental education, Dentistry, Ethics, Health promotion, Oral health, Population surveillance, Program evaluation, Program planning, Public health dentists, Research, Work force

Goode T, Fisher SK. 2012. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural and linguistic competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to LGBTQ youth and their families. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist is designed to help personnel provide services and support to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth and their families that are culturally and linguistically competent. The checklist covers the physical environment, materials and resources, communication practices, values, and attitudes. It provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster cultural diversity and cultural competence.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Assessment, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Homosexuality, Youth

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Engaging Latino families in home visiting programs. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar highlights best practices in engaging Latino families in home visiting programs. Panelists from three different home visiting models share approaches and tools that have led to their success in serving the needs of children and families. Topics included strategies for recruiting and retaining families in the program, specific training for home visitors, program and curriculum adaptation, and research on Latino families’ participation and outcomes.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Audiovisual materials, Cultural sensitivity, Family support services, Hispanic Americans, Home visiting, Newborn infants

Expert Panel on Cultural Competence Education for Students in Medicine and Public Health. 2012. Cultural competence education for students in medicine and public health: Report of an expert panel. Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges and Association of Schools of Public Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the recommendations of an expert panel to ensure that students acquire cultural competencies in their chosen fields to prepare them for successful practice, including the development and delivery of appropriate health care and population health programs, services, and policies for an increasingly diverse U.S. population. Contents include recommendations for embedding cultural competence education within and across curricula of medicine and public health, exemplary case studies, and a road map for the future.

Contact: Association of American Medical Colleges, 655 K Street, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20001-2399, Telephone: (202) 828-0400 Web Site: https://www.aamc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competency, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Curricula, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Medical students, Professional education, Public health education, Racial factors

Network for LGBT Health Equity. 2012. Mpowered: Best and promising practices for LGBT tobacco prevention and control. Boston, MA: Network for LGBT Health Equity, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines best and promising practices for tobacco use prevention and control for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community using the World Health Organization’s best practices model, MPOWER (Monitor, Protect, Offer, Warn, Enforce, and Raise), which outlines the key steps for effective tobacco control programs and additional letters -- E for Evaluate (and disseminate) and D for Diversify -- to address all of the key challenges that LGBT and overlapping disparity populations face. The target audience for the report includes policy makers, grant makers, grant applicants, and tobacco control program administrations.

Contact: Network for LGBT Health Equity, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA Telephone: (617) 927-6451 E-mail: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com/contact/ Web Site: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, High risk groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention, Program improvement, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

Ferguson-Colvin KM, Maccio EM. 2012. Toolkit for practitioners/researchers working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) runaway and homeless youth (RHY). New York, NY: National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections , 66 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for practitioners and researchers working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) youth outlines specific evidence-based programs, practice models, and assessment/evaluation tools used by agency staff working with LGBTQ youth who have run away from home or who are homeless. It highlights available training curricula on cultural sensitivity and standards of care for agency staff and the LGBTQ youth they serve, and includes sample agency non-discrimination policies. The toolkit draws its findings from interviews, literature reviews, and empirical research.

Contact: National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections, Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College, 2180 Third Avenue, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10035, Telephone: (212) 396-7562 E-mail: gmallon@hunter.cuny.edu Web Site: http://www.nrcpfc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Curricula, Homosexuality, Professional materials, Professional training, Program improvement, Youth

Urban Indian Health Institute, Native Generations. 2012. A Native way that's ours. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, Native Generations, 1 video (11 min., 17 sec.).

Annotation: This video discusses the many risks faced by Native Americans in obtaining health care and other culturally specific services for those located in urban areas away from tribal connections. Topics include health, learning about Native culture and history for the next generation, and pregnancy support and advice for mothers and fathers,

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Cultural beliefs, Cultural sensitivity, Family support services, Multimedia

Edelstein S. 2011. Food, cuisine, and cultural competency for culinary, hospitality, and nutrition professionals. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Barlett, 610 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the unique food traditions of over 50 different cultures as they apply to health. The text explores the importance of cultural sensitivity and competency in today's work setting, addresses health literacy issues, and helps readers identify customer communication techniques that enable professionals to establish trust with clients of different ethnic origins. The first section provides an overview of food traditions and practices within various religions, while the remaining sections focus on distinct regions around the world. Individual chapters cover specific countries, focusing on the various contexts that contribute to nutrition and health: lifestyles, eating patterns, ethnic foods, menu planning, communication (verbal and non-verbal), and more. This book is consistent with The American Dietetic Association s Cultural Competence Strategic Plan.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Ethnic groups, Food habits, International health, Minority groups, Nutrition, Nutrition education

Early Head Start National Resource Center. [2010]. Revisiting and updating the multicultural principles for Head Start programs serving children ages birth to five: Addressing culture and home language in Head Start programs and services. [Washington, DC]: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 80 pp.

Annotation: This document provides multicultural principles for Head Start programs and reviews research on multicultural principles. Contents are presented as 10 principles: individuals and culture, culturally relevant Head Start programming, learning about cultures of different groups and discarding stereotypes, cultural relevance and curriculum choices/adaptation, identity and functioning in society, English- and non-English-language learning, staff who reflect and are responsive to communities and families served, multicultural programming for children that respects differences, examining and challenging institutional and personal biases, and incorporating cultural and diverse programs in all systems and services.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural beliefs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Head Start, Oral health, Program development

Delgado JL. 2010. The Latina guide to health: Consejos and caring answers. New York, NY: Newmarket Press, 239 pp.

Annotation: This book provides medical information and advice for Hispanic women. Part One covers environmental and psychosocial issues, including barriers to health, understanding the medical system, preventive care for Latinas, and the care of family and other loved ones. Part Two covers sexuality, pregnancy, and common diseases and disorders; and Part Three covers medical decision-making, record keeping, and health resources. The book includes advice to help Hispanic women prepare for an annual wellness visit, keep good health records, develop healthy eating and exercise habits, nurture the spirit, and address diseases and disorders that are more prevalant among Hispanic women such as arthritis, depression, overweight, diabetes, and cervical cancer. Tools for self care and a quick reference health section are included. It is also available in Spanish.

Contact: Newmarket Press, 18 East 48th Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 832-3575 Fax: (212) 832-3629 E-mail: mailox@newmarketpress.com $15.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-55704-854-7.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Recordkeeping, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Altarum Institute. 2010. Diversity in MCH training: Peer learning collaborative—Activities and preliminary outcomes of 2009-2010. [Washington, DC]: Altarum Institute,

Annotation: This archived webinar from December 15, 2010 discusses the MCH Training Diversity Initiative, peer learning collaborative objectives, context for addressing diversity, team strategies, and collaborative resources.

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, MCH training, Multimedia, Resources for professionals

Shaefer J. 2010. When an infant dies: Cross cultural expressions of grief and loss IV. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; [Lansing, MI]: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 16 pp. (Bulletin [no. 4])

Annotation: This bulletin explores the cultural traditions of African Americans, Iranians, Somalis, and hard of hearing families grieving the loss of an infant. It summarizes a panel presentation from the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program’s Fifth National Conference, held in August 2007 in Alexandria, VA. It includes a brief summary of studies on grief along with insights on the grief responses and customs of families from a variety of cultures. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Blacks, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Grief, Muslims

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health needs and their families [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health care needs and their families, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in human service settings. The checklist provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster such an environment. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing behavioral health services and supports to children, youth, and their families [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health care needs and their families, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in human service settings. The checklist provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster such an environment. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports in early intervention and early childhood settings [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 7 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports in early intervention and early childhood settings, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and linguistic competency. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Early intervention, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires, Young children

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to individuals and families affected by sudden and unexpected infant death (SUID) [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is intended to heighten awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in settings that serve individuals and families experiencing sudden and unexpected infant death. Questions focus on areas including physical environment, materials and resources; communications styles; and values and attitudes.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Infant death, Infant mortality, SIDS, Self evaluation

Action for Healthy Kids. 2009. Lessons for engaging diverse communities to create healthy schools and kids. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 11 pp. (Field report)

Annotation: This report investigates how Action for Healthy Kids teams are working to help diverse communities communicate with one another and appreciate cultural differences for the ultimate purpose of helping schools help students in the areas of nutrition and physical fitness. The report profiles the progress of Action for Healthy Kids teams in Utah, New York and New Jersey, South Carolina, and Idaho.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Blacks, Child health, Community programs, Cultural sensitivity, Families, Hispanic Americans, Idaho:, Low income groups, New Jersey, New York, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Poverty, Prevention, Rural population, Schools, South Carolina, Utah

National Quality Forum. 2009. A comprehensive framework and preferred practices for measuring and reporting cultural competency: A consensus report [executive summary]. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum, 9 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a framework for measuring and reporting cultural competency through a set of 45 preferred practices covering a range of issues, including communication, community engagement, and workforce diversity and training. Additional topics include leadership, integration of cultural competency into management systems and operations, care delivery and supporting mechanisms, and data collection, public accountability, and quality improvement.

Contact: National Quality Forum, 1030 15th Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 783-1300 Fax: (202) 783-3434 E-mail: info@qualityforum.org Web Site: http://www.qualityforum.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-933875-28-6; To order: NQFCR-03-09.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Health services delivery, Leadership training, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Training, Work force

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.