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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice. 2014. Core competencies for public health professionals. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report comprises a set of core competencies for the broad practice of public health in any setting. The core competencies reflect skills that may be desirable for professionals who deliver essential public health services and exist as a foundation for public health practice. The report provides background on the competencies and presents them according to eight domains: analytic/assessment skills, policy-development/program-planning skills, communication skills, cultural competency skills, community dimensions of practice skills, public health sciences skills, financial planning and management skills, and leadership and systems thinking skills.

Contact: Public Health Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 218-4400 Fax: (202) 218-4409 E-mail: info@phf.org Web Site: http://www.phf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Communication skills, Competence, Competency based education, Cultural competence, Leadership, Management, Policy development, Program planning, Public health, Systems development, Work force

U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care. 2014. Cultural competency program for oral health professionals. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care, 1 v.

Annotation: This course is designed to provide oral health professionals and other health professionals with the knowledge and skills they need to promote cultural and linguistic competence in oral health care. The program consists of three modules that address the fundamentals of culturally and linguistically appropriate oral health care, providing culturally and linguistically appropriate oral health care, and culturally and linguistically appropriate communication and messaging.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Clearinghouses, Communication skills, Competency based education, Continuing education, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Federal initiatives, Health services, Oral health, Standards, Training

Goode T, Bronheim S. 2013. Experiential learning: Cultural and linguistic competence checklist for MCH training programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 9 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is designed to facilitate the integration of cultural and linguistic competence in experiential learning opportunities offered by maternal and child health training programs. Topics include choosing and monitoring experiential learning settings; preparing trainees to address stereotyping, bias, and discrimination in experiential learning settings; and supporting students in experiential learning settings. Definitions and key concepts are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Competency based education, Cultural competence, Language barriers, MCH training, Professional education

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2013. Ensuring access to adequate information on medical products for all: With special focus on underrepresented subpopulations, including racial subgroups. [Silver Spring, MD]: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of how the Food and Drug Administration operates in terms of its communications and describes how the agency communicates the benefits and risks of medical products to health care providers and patients, especially underrepresented populations, including racial subgroups. Topics include communications with the general public, including MedWatch, social media, staff and advisory committees, and external stakeholder meetings; as well as designing communications for populations with limited English proficiency, health literacy, and outreach. Appendices include highlights of the risk communications strategic plan, and the Office of Minority Health web site on Federal Health Information.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (888) 463-6332 Fax: (301) 443-3100 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Cultural competency, Federal agencies, Health literacy, Limited English speakers, Public health, Racial factors, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Expert Panel on Cultural Competence Education for Students in Medicine and Public Health. 2012. Cultural competence education for students in medicine and public health: Report of an expert panel. Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges and Association of Schools of Public Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the recommendations of an expert panel to ensure that students acquire cultural competencies in their chosen fields to prepare them for successful practice, including the development and delivery of appropriate health care and population health programs, services, and policies for an increasingly diverse U.S. population. Contents include recommendations for embedding cultural competence education within and across curricula of medicine and public health, exemplary case studies, and a road map for the future.

Contact: Association of American Medical Colleges, 655 K Street, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20001-2399, Telephone: (202) 828-0400 Web Site: https://www.aamc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competency, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Curricula, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Medical students, Professional education, Public health education, Racial factors

Angeles J, Somers SA. 2007. From policy to action: Addressing racial and ethnic disparities at the ground-level. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 10 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief reports on practical strategies that health care purchasers and plans nationally are implementing to address documented gaps in health care delivery. It highlights the need for standardized collection of race, ethnicity and language data, culturally competent approaches, as well as the involvement and commitment of multiple stakeholders to better track and improve barriers to care, incidence of chronic disease, lower quality of care, and higher mortality rates. Sections include the purchaser/policymakers' role in addressing disparities, establishing standards for data collection, using performance incentives to reduce disparities, the role of managed care organizations in addressing disparities, using data to identify disparities and target interventions, increasing access to culturally and linguistically competent care, and involving the community to address disparities.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Cultural competency, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Health care financing, Health services delivery, Language barriers, Racial factors

Kaiser Permanente. 2005. Cultural competency in the clinical setting [participant's binder]. [No place]: Kaiser Permanente, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials for attendees at the December 8, 2005 workshop in Colorado on delivering culturally competent services in the clinical setting. Topics include the care of culturally diverse people; strategies for providing language assistance; persons with disabilities; people of Latino ancestry; Asian or Pacific Islander people; African Americans; and gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (GLBTI) people. Contents of the binder include the workshop agenda, a folder containing language services available, printed PowerPoint slides, handbooks for each of the groups mentioned, and resources and contacts within the Kaiser Permanente system.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Conferences, Cultural competency, Health services delivery, Minority groups, Professional education

U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care. 2004–. Think cultural health. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care, 3 courses.

Annotation: These resources and tools designed for health professionals are intended to promote cultural and linguistic competence in health care. The goal is to advance health equity at every point of contact through the development and promotion of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. Contents include free and accredited continuing education programs as well as tools to help health professionals and organizations provide respectful, understandable, and effective services. Information on standards in specific areas, such as oral health and state legislative initiatives, is provided. A clearinghouse of materials is provided; searches can be performed using assigned keywords.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Clearinghouses, Communication skills, Competency based education, Continuing education, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Federal initiatives, Health services, Oral health, Standards, Training

American Public Welfare Association, Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, National Association of State Mental Health Program directors. 1996. Child welfare, children's mental health, and families: A partnership for action. (Rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 64 pp.

Annotation: This document advocates collaboration on programs for children's mental health between the child welfare and children's mental health agencies, and the children's families. Section I states their shared core values and guiding principles. Section II lists the core practices. Section III discusses program areas urgently needing joint action. Sections IV and V are about getting started and future plans. Three appendices make recommendations for state and community action.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child mental health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Community programs, Cultural competency, Cultural diversity, Family centered services, Family preservation, Health care financing, Homeless persons, Interagency cooperation

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.