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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (29 total).

National Governors Association. 2016. Improving state efforts to prepare and respond to public health emergencies. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides state governors with actions they can take to improve preparedness for public health emergencies. Topics include understanding legal authority to respond in the event of a public health disaster, establishing and institutionalizing coordination among key players, strengthening internal and external communications, and identifying gaps in baseline capabilities and available resources needed to address these gaps.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Crisis intervention, Disaster planning, Legal issues, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Resource allocation, Service delivery systems, State government

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Child maltreatment: Resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource brief provides sources of information on child maltreatment, including crisis intervention, support services, advocacy groups, and organizations that focus on preventing or mitigating the physical, psychological, and emotional effects of abuse or neglect of a child under the age of 18. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Crisis intervention, Electronic resources, Neglect, Prevention

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Children and adolescents exposed to violence: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource brief provides sources of information about children and adolescents who are exposed to violence as victims or as witnesses in homes, schools, and communities and strategies to prevent or mitigate the physical, psychological, emotional, and social effects. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Adolescents, Electronic resources, Violence, Crisis intervention

Save the Children. 2014. State of the world's mothers 2014: Saving mothers and children in humanitarian crises. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 93 pp.

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Policy, Planning, and Innovation. 2014. Crisis services: Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and funding strategies. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the evidence base on the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different types of crisis services, and then presents case studies of different approaches that states are using to coordinate, consolidate, and blend fund sources in order to provide robust crisis services.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS Pub. No. (SMA)-14-4848.

Keywords: Case studies, Collaboration, Cost effectiveness, Crisis intervention, Emergencies, Financing, Integrated services, Mental health services, Program evaluation, Service coordination, State programs

Willoughby B. (2013). A guide for administrators, counselors and teachers: Responding to hate and bias at school. Montgomery, AL: Teaching Tolerance, 41 pp.

Annotation: This book, primarily for school administrators, also helps teachers, staff, counselors, and students find guidance in responding to a bias incident or hate crime. The guide is divided into three sections: before, during, and after a crisis occurs. Topics include assessing the school climate with an eye towards defusing tension, preventing escalation, and avoiding problems; key points to consider when responding to a bias or hate incident; and addressing long-term planning and capacity building for the future, including development of social and emotional skills.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Crisis intervention, Emergencies, Hate crime, Needs assessment, School counseling, School health services, School personnel, School violence

Lorenzo SB. 2013. Dating violence among adolescents: Resource brief. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource brief provides sources of information about dating violence among adolescents and strategies to prevent or mitigate the physical, psychological, emotional, and social effects. It includes resources, services, and support programs for teens, parents, and professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Crisis intervention, Dating, Electronic resources, Interpersonal violence, Prevention

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Suicide Prevention Resources Center Workgroup. 2011. After a suicide: A toolkit for schools. New York, NY: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention; Newton, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 48 pp.

Annotation: This resource addresses schools facing real-time crises, providing information on ways to deal with loss in a school community and how to promote a coordinated response. The toolkit provides school districts and private school associations with evidence-based programs designed to address serious childhood and adolescent distress and prevent suicide (Objective 4.2 of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention). Content includes consensus recommendations developed in consultation with school-based personnel, clinicians, researchers, and crisis-response professionals. It incorporates relevant existing material and research findings as well as references, templates, and links to additional information and assistance. Specific areas addressed in the toolkit include crisis response, helping students cope, working with the community, memorialization, social media, suicide contagion, bringing in outside help, and going forward.

Contact: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, 120 Wall Street, 22nd Floor, New York, NY 10005, Telephone: (212) 363-3500 Secondary Telephone: (888) 333-AFSP Fax: (212) 363-6237 E-mail: inquiry@asfp.org Web Site: http://www.afsp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bereavement, Coping, Crisis intervention, Grief, Prevention, Resources for professionals, School age children, School counseling, Schools, Students, Suicide

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH). 2011. The impact of violence on substance abuse and the mental health and physical health of adolescents and young women. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, 1 video (60 min.). (Webinar #5 of 6)

Annotation: This webinar discusses the impact of domestic violence and sexual violence on the mental and physical health of adolescents and women of childbearing age in North Carolina. Topics include national indicators of child maltreatment; partner or sexual violence prevalence; statistical differences in reporting statistics; child and adolescent experience with sexual or physical violence victimization and risk of health problems; violence and pregnancy; developing partnerships; and approaches for identifying women with these experiences and integrating care. This program is available for continuing education credits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 170 Rosenau Hall, CB #5400, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, E-mail: sphcomm@listserv.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.sph.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Chronic disease, Continuing education, Crisis intervention, Distance education, Domestic violence, MCH training programs, Mental health, North Carolina, Physical abuse, Pregnancy, Screening, Sexual abuse, Substance abuse, Women's health

Harvard College. 2011. Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) of Suicide. Boston, MA: Harvard College, multiple items.

Annotation: This online course is designed for those who counsel people at risk for suicide, primarily mental health and medical providers, but also clergy and social service providers. The first module explains why reducing access to lethal methods of self-harm saves lives. The second module teaches practical skills on when and how to ask suicidal clients about their access to lethal means and how to work with them and their families to reduce their access. Course elements include a pre-test questionnaire, access to the online course, a post-test, and a feedback survey. This program is available for continuing education credits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Continuing education, Counseling, Crisis intervention, Distance education, MCH training programs, Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Suicide prevention

Child Welfare Information Gateay. 2010. Infant safe haven laws: Summary of state laws. [Washington, DC]: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes infant safe haven laws intended to provide incentive for mothers in crisis to safely relinquish their babies to designated locations where they will be protected and provided with medical care until a permanent home can be found. The report compares the infant safe haven legislation in the U.S. states and territories that have enacted such laws, describing who may legally leave an infant at a safe haven; who is considered to be a "safe haven provider;" and what the responsibilities of the providers are. The report also describes the immunity from liability that the providers receive as well as the protections from criminal liability (and the consequences of relinquishment) that parents receive under the safe haven laws.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Infant health, Law enforcement, Safety programs, State legislation

Littel K. 2004. Family violence: An intervention model for dental professionals. Washington, DC: U.S. Office for Victims of Crime, 11 pp. (OVC bulletin)

Annotation: This bulletin describes a training session to teach oral health professionals about their unique role in recognizing symptoms and patterns of family violence and abuse. The bulletin discusses how to create a safe environment for disclosure, intervene appropriately, refer individuals to appropriate services, and file mandatory reports.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NCJ 204004.

Keywords: Crisis intervention, Dental education, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Families, Family violence, Models, Oral health, Physical abuse, Training materials

Schechter S, Edleson JL. [2003]. Effective intervention in domestic violence and child maltreatment cases: Guidelines for policy and practice. Reno, NV: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to (1) offer communities a guiding framework to develop interventions and measure progress as they seek to improve their responses to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment and (2) present leaders of communities and institutions with a context-setting tool to develop public policy aimed at keeping families safe and stable. Chapter 1 articulates an overall principle of safety, well-being, and stability for all victims of family violence and the need to hold batterers accountable. Chapter 2 develops a series of principles to guide communities. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 focus on specific recommendations for the child protection systems, the network of domestic violence service providers, and the juvenile or other trial courts with jurisdiction over child maltreatment cases. The report also contains endnotes.

Contact: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, University of Nevada, P.O. Box 8970, Reno, NV 89507, Telephone: (775) 784-6012 Fax: (775) 784-6628 E-mail: staff@ncjfcj.org Web Site: http://www.ncjfcj.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Child abuse, Child safety, Community based services, Crisis intervention, Domestic violence, Family support services, Public policy, Violence prevention

Allen M. 2002. The well being of our nation: An inter-generational vision of effective mental health services and supports. Washington, DC: National Council on Disability, 81 pp.

Annotation: This report is designed to provide a broad overview of the current state of public systems charged with providing mental health services and supports to children, youth, adults, and seniors and to identify, across these age groups, common trends that have led to the failure of these systems. It examines the following themes: (1) mental health systems are focused on crisis, (2) there are missed opportunities for prevention, (3) despite clear eligibility, many people are denied mental health services and supports or find them inaccessible, and (4) the failure to provide mental health services and supports leads to tragic consequences. The report includes an executive summary. Some information is presented in figures within the report. The appendix describes the mission of the National Council on Disability.

Contact: National Council on Disability, 1331 F Street, N.W., Suite 850, Washington, DC 20004-1107, Telephone: (202) 272-2004 Secondary Telephone: (202) 272-2074 Fax: (202) 272-2022 E-mail: ncd@ncd.gov Web Site: http://www.ncd.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Adult health, Child mental health, Crisis intervention, Disabilities, Eligibility, Health care systems, Mental health, Mental health services, Older adults, Prevention, Trends

New York State Office of Mental Health. 2000. Crisis counseling guide to children and families in disasters. Albany, NY: New York State Office of Mental Health, 104 pp.

Annotation: This guide was created to help people who respond to children's mental health needs deal with the impact that emergencies and disasters may have on children. The guide covers the following topics: (1) defining disasters, (2) age-related reactions of children in disasters, (3) school response, (4) program planning, (5) training, and (6) resources. The guide also includes disaster plan samples and prototypes. Two appendices include contact information and references.

Contact: New York State Office of Mental Health, 44 Holland Avenue, Albany, NY 12229, Telephone: (800) 597-8481 Secondary Telephone: (518) 474-4403 Fax: (518) 474-2149 Web Site: http://www.omh.state.ny.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Crisis intervention, Disasters, Emergencies, Families, Mental health, New York, Program planning, Resource materials, Schools, Training

Chalk R, King PA, eds. 1998. Violence in families: Assessing prevention and treatment programs. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 392 pp.

Annotation: This book looks at the successes and failures of family violence interventions. Included are recommendations to guide services, programs, policy, and research on victim support and assistance, treatments and penalties for offenders, and law enforcement. Also included is an analysis of 114 evaluation studies on the outcomes of different kinds of programs and services. The scope and complexity of family violence is explored, including identification of the multiple types of victims and offenders who require different approaches to intervention. The book outlines strategies for collaborations between researchers and practitioners that could improve the design and evaluation of prevention and treatment services for family violence. Other topics discussed are the issues that underlie all types of family violence, risk factors that contribute to violent behavior in families, and the balance between punitive sanctions and individual support.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Contact Phone: (800) 624-6242 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-05496-6.

Keywords: Crisis intervention, Evaluation, Family violence, Prevention, Program evaluation, Research

Schechter S, Gary LT. 1994. Health care services for battered women and their abused children: A manual about AWAKE—Advocacy for women and kids in emergencies. Boston, MA: Children's Hospital, 73 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes AWAKE (Advocacy for Women and Kids in Emergencies), a model mother-child public health family violence intervention project. The philosophy of the program, protecting children by protecting women, is discussed in the manual's overview. A summary of the project's services, an explanation of its administration, and suggestions for starting a similar program are contained in the publication. Also included are selected bibliographies on battered women, abused children, domestic violence, health care protocols, and training materials; a project description; and an AWAKE basic data form.

Keywords: Advocacy, Battered women, Child Abuse, Child abuse, Crisis intervention, Family violence, Interagency cooperation, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 1993. The prevention of youth violence: A framework for community action. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 95 pp.

Annotation: This manual shows how community-based programs can reduce violence in the communities. The book identifies specific activities plus a framework for putting them into place. The first part, Activities to Prevent Youth Violence, describes the target groups, settings, and strategies for prevention. The second part, Program Management, covers basic principles of effective community-based health promotion programs and includes suggestions on organizing the community, gathering and analyzing information, setting goals and objectives, locating resources, and monitoring the progress of the program. An index of community programs to prevent youth violence is included.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Contact Phone: (404) 488-4646 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assault, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, Conflict resolution, Crisis intervention, Education, Firearms, Intervention, Leadership, Parenting, Peer groups, Population surveillance, Prevention, Violence, Weapons

Kirk WG. 1993. Adolescent suicide: A school-based approach to assessment and intervention. Washington, DC: Research Press, 175 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses adolescent suicide intervention and assessment strategies for use in schools. It provides information on: the incidence of youth suicide; stressors as factors in suicide; risk assessment including an overview of warning signs and symptoms of suicidal tendencies and depression; interventions specifically occurring in the school setting; the use of the school suicide crisis team; and suicide risk of particular adolescent populations: minorities, homosexuals and lesbians, youth with eating disorders, and college students. An extensive bibliography is provided.

Contact: Research Press, Dept. 28W, PO Box 9177, Champaign, IL 61826, Telephone: (217) 352-3273 Secondary Telephone: (800) 519-2707 Contact Phone: (217) 352-3273 Fax: (217) 352-1221 E-mail: rp@researchpress.com Web Site: http://www.researchpress.com/ $14.95. Document Number: ISBN 0-87822-336-3.

Keywords: Adolescents, Crisis intervention, Mental health, Risk assessment, School based programs, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.