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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (22 total).

National Institute of Justice. 2016. Safety, health, and wellness strategic research plan 2016–2021. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, 18 pp.

Annotation: This document describes current and projected efforts to promote the safety, health, and wellness of individuals affected by, or employed within, the criminal justice system. Contents include strategic priorities and action plans for promoting and supporting research, including research to understand how children and families of criminal justice-involved individuals are affected by the criminal justice system. Descriptions of ongoing research projects on topics such as school safety and school-based mental health services in a large metropolitan school district are also included.

Contact: National Institute of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-2942 Fax: (202) 307-6394 Web Site: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Children, Criminal justice system, Families, Interdisciplinary approach, Mental health services, Multidisciplinary teams, Research, School safety, Schools, Strategic plans

Sickmund M, Puzzanchera C, eds. 2015. Juvenile offenders and victims: 2014 national report. Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 230 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the most requested information about juveniles and the juvenile justice system in the United States. Contents include information about juvenile population characteristics, juvenile victims and offenders, juvenile justice system structure and process, law enforcement and juvenile crime, and juvenile offenders in court and correctional facilities.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Corrections, Criminal justice system, Data, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Juvenile offenders, Juveniles

National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk. 2015. Creating and maintaining good relationships between juvenile justice and education agencies. Washington, DC: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, 3 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet is designed to assist state and local justice and education agency administrators in creating strong working relationships that make high-quality education programs within juvenile justice settings possible. Topics include the importance of working together, the biggest challenges to good relationships, and working together toward a meaningful and sustainable partnership.

Contact: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, American Institutes of Research, Washington, DC Web Site: http://www.neglected-delinquent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Educational programs, Juvenile justice, Local government, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resources for professionals, State departments of education, Sustainability

Morgan E, Salomon N, Plotkin M, Cohen R. 2014. The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Lexington, KY: Council of State Governments, 436 pp.

Annotation: This report presents strategies to support educators and minimize school systems' dependence on suspension, expulsion, and arrest to manage student behaviors while promoting safe and productive learning environments that improve academic outcomes for all students and reduce their involvement in the juvenile justice system. Topics include conditions for learning, targeted behavioral interventions, school-police partnerships, courts and juvenile justice, information sharing, and data collection.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Learning, Policy development, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, School age children, School attendance, School failure, School role, School safety, Students, Systems development

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence. 2014. Tools for success: Working with youth with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the juvenile justice system (rev.). Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 1 v.

Annotation: These modules for individuals working with youth in the juvenile justice system provide information and resources on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Contents include six modules on topics such as FASD basics; behaviors; screening, assessment, and diagnosis; collaborating effectively; and intervention services. Each module ends with a 10-question quiz.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 2101 Gaither Road, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (866)786-7327 E-mail: fasdcenter1@ngc.com Web Site: http://www.fascenter.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Criminal justice system, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Intervention, Resources for professionals, Training, Youth

Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission. 2014. WSCJTC safe infant sleep roll call training. Burien, WA: Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, 1 video (11 min., 54 sec.).

Annotation: This video for law enforcement professionals provides an introduction to the Cops-N-Cribs program. Topics include the basics of safe infant sleep practices and their relationship to sudden infant death prevention. The video also describes a crib distribution program to help parents and other caregivers provide a safe sleep environment for infants.

Contact: Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, 19010 1st Avenue South, Burien, WA 98148, Telephone: (206) 835-7300 Secondary Telephone: (206) 439-2895 Web Site: https://fortress.wa.gov/cjtc/www Available from the website.

Keywords: Criminal justice system, Infant death, Injury prevention, Safety programs, Sleep position, Training, Unintentional injuries

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network. 2009. The landscape of opportunity: Cultivating health equity in California. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 40 pp.

Annotation: This brief includes information on socioeconomic and environmental and social factors such as education, housing, neighborhood safety, food access, criminal justice, and health insurance, among others, to show how they are connected and how they impact health and what are the key factors to focus on in the quest to eliminate health inequities in communities of color in California. The brief also presents a framework for health equity and discusses policy recommendations.

Contact: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 1221 Preservation Park Way, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 832-1160 Fax: (510) 832-1175 E-mail: info@cpehn.org Web Site: http://www.cpehn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Criminal justice system, Education, Ethnic factors, Food, Health, Health insurance, Housing, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Minority groups, Neighborhoods, Nutrition, Physical activity, Poverty, Public policy, Racial factors, Safety, State surveys

Walker VS, Snarey JR, eds. 2004. Race-ing moral formation: African American perspectives on care and justice. New York, NY: Teacher's College Press, 208 pp.

Annotation: The papers collected in this volume reveal the contribution of African American voices to understanding the relationship between justice and care. The first part of the text provides a psychological perspective on moral formation among African Americans during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Part two provides practical, pedagogical perspectives drawn from the past, present, and ongoing challenges of African American educational practices, focusing on what African American voices have to say about promoting care, justice, and moral formation within schools. Appendices include information on chapter-correlated films that illustrate these values and a summary of ways in which each chapter contributes to the understanding of each of the justice-and-care primary dual values. References, information on the contributors, and an index are included.

Contact: Teacher's College Press, 1234 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (800) 575-6566 Secondary Telephone: (212) 678-3929 Fax: (212) 678-4149 E-mail: tcpress@tc.columbia.edu Web Site: http://www.tcpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8077-4449-2.

Keywords: Blacks, Criminal justice system, Education, Life skills, Moral development, Moral values, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Social discrimination, Social integration, Social values

Nolan CM. 2003. Children of arrested parents: Strategies to improve their safety and well-being. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report examines, from a practice and policy perspective, issues pertinent to the safety and well-being of children affected by the arrest of a custodial parent. It focuses particularly on families where either the sole or both custodial parents have been arrested, and there is no evidence of child abuse, neglect, or abandonment. The report discusses emergency placement issues, presents information on additional risks that affected children face, presents a framework for developing future policies and programs for this population, and reviews five promising practices to protect children affected by parental arrest. The report concludes with recommendations for state-level policy changes.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Child safety, Children, Criminal justice system, High risk children, Parents, Public policy

Schmittroth L, ed. 1995. Statistical record of women worldwide. (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1047 pp.

Annotation: This statistical summary presents data that reflect the condition of women, their lives, and their opportunities throughout the world. The preface describes the intent, methodology, and organization of the volume, and provides information on its use. It includes published and non-published data from governmental and non-governmental sources. The individual tables provide source information; a complete list of sources consulted is also included, and detailed indexes are provided. The range of topics covered are: attitudes and opinions; business and economics; crime, law enforcement, and legal justice; domestic life; education; health and medical care; income, spending, and wealth; labor, employment, and occupations; the military; population and vital statistics; public life; religion; sexuality; and sports and recreation.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8103-8872-3.

Keywords: Attitudes, Business, Careers, Costs, Crime, Criminal justice system, Data, Demographics, Economic factors, Education, Employment, Family economics, Family income, Family life, Government, Health, Health services, International data, Labor, Law enforcement, Military, Political systems, Religion, Sex role, Sexuality, Sports, Vital statistics, Women, Women's rights

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service. 1994. Family violence resource package. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, 29 items.

Annotation: This information package contains monographs, journal articles, and newsletters that focus on family violence. The individual items were previously prepared or published by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, or the Bureau of Justice Assistance between 1986 and 1994. The materials cover topics such as child abuse, the cycle of violence, elderly victims, murder in families, interventions of the justice system, violence against women, and domestic violence. Other materials include abstracts from violence program grants; research funded by the Office of Justice Programs; family violence referral lists and reading lists on child abuse, domestic violence, and elderly victims.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov $32.00 includes shipping and handling; prepayment required. Document Number: NCJ 147703.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child sexual abuse, Criminal justice system, Domestic violence, Elder abuse, Family violence, Intervention, Prevention

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service. 1994. Community policing resource package. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, 24 items.

Annotation: This information package contains monographs, journal articles, and newsletters that focus on community policing. The individual items were previously prepared or published by the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, or the National Crime Prevention Council between 1988 and 1994. The materials include pieces that give an overview of community policing, describe the implementation of such programs in various cities and rural communities, consider the effect on the community, and review the overall impact on the criminal justice system. An annotated bibliography listing other readings is also included.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov $32.00 includes shipping and handling; prepayment required. Document Number: NCJ 147702.

Keywords: Criminal justice system, Law enforcement, Outreach, Personnel

Jaros KJ, ed. 1993. Violence as a public health problem: Developing culturally appropriate prevention strategies for adolescents and children. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Public Health Social Work Training Program, 79 pp., exec. summ. (25 pp.).

Annotation: This report provides summaries of presentations at the 1992 Public Health Social Work Maternal and Child Health Institute. The conference examined violence as a public health problem and attempted to identify preventive interventions focusing on children, youth, and families. A major objective was to facilitate communication and cooperative program development among health, education, and social service systems. Preventive approaches are emphasized in the report, and several model programs are described. A 25-page executive summary, published in 1992, is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHG071 (report), MCHF104 (executive summary).

Keywords: Adolescents, Assault, Children, Criminal justice system, Demographics, Education, Family violence, Firearms, Gangs, Injury prevention, Media violence, Population surveillance, Program development, Rape, Risk factors, Socioeconomic status, U.S.Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Violence, Weapons

Whitcomb D. 1993. Child victims as witnesses: What the research says. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, 55 pp. (Child victim as witness series)

Annotation: This report considers issues that arise when children are court witnesses in child abuse cases. It is intended to help those in the health, mental health, law, and social works professions that deal with children in court cases serve them better. The report builds a context for children in the court system and then examines current research in the following five areas: the accuracy of children's memories, their credibility as witnesses, techniques for improving their testimony, innovative techniques that assist child witnesses, and the emotional effects of the court process on child victims. It also includes recommendations for reform based on the findings of the research examined.

Contact: Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 969-7100 Fax: (617) 969-5979 E-mail: comment@edc.org Web Site: http://www.edc.org $10.00 includes handling.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child sexual abuse, Children, Criminal justice system, Witnesses

Association of Trial Lawyers of America, Johns Hopkins Injury Prevention Center, and Southern California Injury Prevention Research Center. 1993. Preventing violence to women: Integrating the health and legal communities—Report of the conference. Washington, DC: Association of Trial Lawyers of America, 90 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the proceedings of a conference sponsored by the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, Johns Hopkins Injury Prevention Center, and the Southern California Injury Prevention Research Center held June 3, 1993, in Washington, DC. The conference was attended by physicians, lawyers, law enforcement officials, hospital administrators, and representatives from victims' organizations and women's advocacy groups. The goal was to develop collaborative efforts among medical and legal communities to form community-based programs which recognize and prevent violence against women. Some recommendations include stricter enforcement of civil protection orders and mandatory arrest laws; better identification of abuse by physicians and hospitals; adoption of the American Medical Association (AMA) guidelines on domestic violence; collaborative epidemiological research to dispel myths of family violence; and the removal of gender bias in the criminal justice system. Appendices include a list of resources available from various violence prevention agencies and a directory of organizations.

Contact: American Association for Justice, 1050 31st Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (800) 424-2725 Secondary Telephone: (202) 965-3500 Web Site: http://www.justice.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Assault, Community based services, Criminal justice system, Domestic violence, Epidemiology, Hospitals, Interagency cooperation, Physical abuse, Sexual assault, Violence prevention

Colorado Department of Health, and Colorado Domestic Violence Coalition. 1992. Domestic violence, a guide for health care providers. (4th ed.). Denver, CO: Colorado Domestic Violence Coalition and Colorado Department of Public Health, 283 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this manual is to increase the knowledge of all health care providers about domestic violence to facilitate full participation in a community-wide strategy to stop domestic violence. The manual is separated into specific sections which contain information about the cycle of violence, applicable Colorado statues, behaviors and characteristics of survivors and perpetrators, and assessment and intervention strategies. The sections include: 1) problem overview; 2) the medical community's legal responsibilities; 3) ramifications of battering; 4) case identification, assessment, documentation and intervention strategies; 5) protocol development, implementation and maintenance, with a sample emergency room protocol, designed for practical use in the emergency room setting; 6) bibliography; 7) listings of films related to battering and addresses of the Colorado Domestic Violence Coalition member organizations, with space for adding local area resources; and 8) a compilation of 25 articles on battered women's care. For further information contact Deborah Haack, Coordinator, Family Violence Prevention Program, Colorado Department of Public Health, 4210 East 11th Avenue, Denver, CO 80220-3716. Telephone (303) 331-8293. Department telephone (303) 320-8333. Providers in Illinois may access information to coordinate with the Colorado manual that is modified to reflect Illinois statutes and referral services. Contact Vicky Biddle, Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Promotion and Injury Control, 535 West Jefferson Street, Springfield, IL 62761. Telephone (217) 785-2060. The 30-minute videotape is a companion part of the training curriculum for health care givers on the subject of domestic violence (spouse abuse, battered women). Entitled "Recognizing the Epidemic, " the videotape presents some data on these injuries and stresses the value of correctly identifying the cause of injuries seen. A big segment is devoted to the "how to s" of identifying abuse injuries. Information on eliciting true reports from the victims and on the 'cycle of abuse' are provided.

Keywords: Battered women, Criminal justice system, Curricula, Domestic violence, Health care systems, Injury prevention, Pregnancy, Professional education, Resource materials, Training, Treatment

Checkoway B, Finn J. 1992. Young people as community builders. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan School of Social Work, 82 pp.

Annotation: Based on a national study funded by the Kellogg Foundation, this book presents case studies of young people who plan innovative programs and practical ideas to promote participation in their communities. Sample projects profiled include New York adolescents rehabilitating housing for homeless families, Minneapolis adolescents reaching out to gangs, and programs in Chicago, Indianapolis, Washington, D.C., Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Selma, Alabama and Belle Fouche, South Dakota.

Contact: University of Michigan, School of Social Work, 1080 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-1689, Telephone: (734) 764-3309 Fax: (734) 936-1961 Web Site: http://www.ssw.umich.edu/ $10.00 plus $1.00 postage/handling.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Case studies, Community programs, Criminal justice system, Injury prevention, Intervention, Program development, Risk factors, Social services, Violence prevention

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 1992. Children's justice act grant program: A report to Congress on state programs for the investigation and prosecution of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, 139 pp.

Annotation: This report provides of an overview of the state-based programs funded by the Children's Justice Act Grants. These programs were designed to improve approaches to the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases, particularly those in which sexual abuse is a factor. Key program accomplishments and initiatives as well as a summary of findings and conclusions are presented. Examples of areas highlighted in the report where improvement was shown include training, establishment of child advocacy centers, development of multidisciplinary teams, legal process simplification, and research and evaluation. The report also includes initiatives that have addressed sentencing laws as well as indirect testimony admission procedures. The report explores the various methods states have used to meet eligibility requirements, as well as methods to implement the goals of the Children's Justice Act. The appendices include a copy of the legislation authorizing the Children's Act Grant Program, program instructions, recipients of grant monies in FY 1988, and a sample report from one of the state multidisciplinary task forces.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (703) 821-2086 E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: 20-10021.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Criminal justice system, Federal grants, Investigations, Law enforcement, State programs, Statistics

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 1989. Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving: Background papers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 260 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: The background papers in this volume were commissioned to provide a foundation for and launch the discussion of the expert panels of the workshop. The authors presented state of the art in the different fields and describe the various attempts throughout the country and world to prevent alcohol-impaired driving. The topics were alcohol beverage control policies, mass communication effects on drinking and driving, epidemiologic perspectives on drunk driving, controlling injuries due to drinking and driving, the effectiveness of legal sanctions in dealing with drinking drivers, issues in the enforcement of impaired driving laws, transportation and alcohol service policies, injury control, youth impaired driving, problems among Native Americans and Alaska Natives, drunk driving among blacks and Hispanics, treatment, and citizen advocacy.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy, Advocacy, Alaska natives, American Indians, Blacks, Business, Consumer education, Criminal justice system, Data, Epidemiology, Hispanic Americans, Impaired driving, Industry, Injury prevention, Intervention, Law enforcement, Legislation, Mass media, Media campaigns, Motor vehicles, Outreach, Policies, Political systems, Prevention, Rehabilitation

Bross DC, Krugman RD, Lenherr MR, Rosenberg DA, Schmitt BD, eds. 1988. The new child protection team handbook. New York, NY: Garland Publishing Company, 636 pp. (Garland reference library of social science; v. 380)

Annotation: This manual serves as a guide for those professionals working on a multidisciplinary case management team for child abuse and neglect victims. Sections focus on case management team development and organization, diagnostic and assessment duties of team members, involvement with the legal system, specialized case management teams, and current trends in case management.

Contact: Garland Science, Taylor and Francis Group, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxford, United Kingdom OX14 4RN, Telephone: +44 (0) 7017 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 7017 6699 Web Site: http://www.taylorandfrancis.co.uk Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-8240-8519-1.

Keywords: Case management, Child abuse, Child protective services, Children, Criminal justice system, Injury prevention, Interagency cooperation, Interdisciplinary approach, Investigations, Law enforcement, Manuals, Multidisciplinary teams, Service coordination, Social services

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.