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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

Sickmund M, Puzzanchera C, eds. 2015. Juvenile offenders and victims: 2014 national report. Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 230 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the most requested information about juveniles and the juvenile justice system in the United States. Contents include information about juvenile population characteristics, juvenile victims and offenders, juvenile justice system structure and process, law enforcement and juvenile crime, and juvenile offenders in court and correctional facilities.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Corrections, Criminal justice system, Data, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Juvenile offenders, Juveniles

Gottesman D, Schwartz SW. 2011. Juvenile justice in the U.S.: Facts for policymakers. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information and statistics on adolescents who have been involved in the juvenile justice system or who have been charged for serious or violent legal offenses. The fact sheet examines trends during the period from 1999 to 2008, comparing changes in the types of crimes committed and the gender, race, and ethnicity of offenders, The sheet also discusses the mental health needs of juvenile offenders; the mental health services currently available to them; the decision-making process during which the court determines whether or not a juvenile will be tried as a child or as an adult; and the residential placement facilities and alternative community centers that serve this youth population. Examples of effective community-based facilities for juvenile offenders and cost comparison data are also provided. A summary of the challenges and a list of recommendations for improved outcomes are also included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Data, Juvenile courts, Juvenile justice, Statistics, Trends, Youth

Children and Family Futures. 2011. The collaborative practice model for family, recovery, safety and stability. Irvine, CA: Children and Family Futures, 39 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is geared toward state and community collaborative groups, discusses 10 system-linkage elements that child welfare, substance abuse treatment, and juvenile court dependency systems, as well as other agencies and providers working with these systems, can use to collaborate with one another. Topic include the elements of system linkages; the mission, underlying values, and principles of collaboration; screening and assessment; engagement and retention care; services to children of parents with substance use disorders; efficient communication and sharing information systems; budgeting and program sustainability; training and staff development; working with related agencies; joint accountability and shared outcomes; and resources and tools for elements of system linkages.

Contact: Children and Family Futures, 4940 Irvine Boulevard, Suite 202, Irvine, CA 92620, Telephone: (714) 505-3525 Fax: (714) 505-3626 E-mail: contact_us@cffutures.org Web Site: http://www.cffutures.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child welfare agencies, Children, Collaboration, Communication, Community programs, Families, Financing, Juvenile courts, Parents, Screening, Service delivery systems, State programs, Substance abuse treatment, Training

Klain E, Pilnik L, Talati E, Maze CL, Diamond-Berry K, Hudson L. 2009. Healthy beginnings, healthy futures: A judge's guide. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law, 150 pp.

Annotation: This guide addresses the array of health needs of very young children in the child welfare system. The guide provides research-based tools and strategies to help judges promote better outcomes for infants and young children who enter their courtrooms. Topics include (1) meeting the needs of very young children in dependency court, (2) promoting physical health, (3) addressing early mental health and developmental needs, (4) achieving permanency, and (5) improving the court's response. Practice tips related to each of these topics are offered, as well. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-60442-611-3.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare agencies, Courts, Early childhood development, Health promotion, Infant, Infant development, Mental health, Research, Young children

Greenbook National Evaluation Team. 2008. The Greenbook Initiative: Final evaluation report. [Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 68 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final evaluation report assesses the extent to which Greenbook implementation activities facilitated cross-system and within-system change and practice in the child welfare agencies, dependency courts, and domestic violence service providers. The Greenbook provides principles and recommendations to guide communities and these three primary systems on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social services, Child abuse, Child welfare agencies, Courts, Domestic violence, Maltreated children, Program evaluation

Davis L, Kinnicutt L, Reynolds S. [2007]. Community self-assessment tool: For agencies addressing the co-occurence of domestic violence and child maltreatment. Reno, NV: Family Violence Department, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, 5 pp.

Annotation: This tool is designed to assist child protection, mental health, or juvenile court systems in communicating more effectively with one another on behalf of families that are experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment and are involved in multiple systems. The tool includes the following categories: (1) system interaction, (2) practice implications, (3) data, (4) resources, (5) emerging issues, and (6) community strengths and challenges. Resources for more information are provided.

Contact: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, University of Nevada, P.O. Box 8970, Reno, NV 89507, Telephone: (775) 784-6012 Fax: (775) 784-6628 E-mail: staff@ncjfcj.org Web Site: http://www.ncjfcj.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Collaboration, Collaboration, Communication, Domestic violence, Families, Juvenile courts, Maltreated children, Mental health, Service delivery systems

Smariga M. 2007. Visitation with infants and toddlers in foster care: What judges and attorneys need to know. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law and Zero to Three Policy Center, 26 pp. (Practice and policy brief)

Annotation: This paper summarizes the role of attachment and the effects of separation on very young children, explains why face-to-face parent-child visitation is important for very young children, emphasizes the role of visitation in permanency planning, highlights key elements of successful visitation plans for infants and toddlers, suggests strategies for addressing barriers to visitation, reviews the judge's role in supporting parent-child visits, and shares community approaches to visitation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Attachment behavior, Children with special health care needs, Courts, Emotional development, Foster care, Foster children, Health services, Infants, Toddlers

Hudson L, Klain E, Smariga M, Youcha V. 2007. Healing the youngest children: Model court-community partnerships. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law and Zero to Three Policy Center, 30 pp. (Practice and policy brief: Baby briefs)

Annotation: This paper describes and furnishes sample cases of four model court-community partnerships that exhibit improved outcomes in providing for the developmental needs of very young children in the welfare system and their families. Dynamic factors of these programs include: systems change, which defines the roles of judges, service providers, lawyers, and the community; focus on services for very young children; procedural enhancements; and sustainability efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Child welfare agencies, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Courts, Foster care, Foster children, Infants, Maltreated children, Model programs, Toddlers, Welfare services

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Child welfare and juvenile justice: Federal agencies could play a stronger role in helping states reduce the number of children placed solely to obtain mental health services. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the numbers and characteristics of children voluntarily placed in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems in order to receive mental health services, the factors that influence such placements, and promising state and local practices that may reduce the need for some child welfare and juvenile justice placements. The report outlines the results, background, available estimates, multiple factor that influence decisions to place children, a brief review of state practices, conclusions, recommendations, and agency comments. The appendices provide information on the scope and methodology of the study; a chart of state statutes containing language allowing voluntary placement to obtain mental health services; and comments from the federal Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Justice. The final appendix provides General Accounting Office contacts and acknowledgments.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-397.

Keywords: Antisocial behavior, Child behavior, Child mental health, Child welfare, Federal agencies, Juvenile courts, Mental health services, State surveys

National Council on Disability. 2003. Olmstead: Reclaiming institutionalized lives. (Abridged version). Washington, DC: National Council on Disability, 195 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the nation's response to the U.S. Supreme Court's 1999 decision that the unjustified institutionalization of people with disabilities is a form of discrimination. It reports on the extent of unnecessary institutionalization in the United States, the continuing barriers to community placement, and resources and services models that facilitate community integration. It examines the federal government's implementation efforts and the strategies states and key stakeholders are using to (1) develop consensus on a coordinated actions plan, (2) identify and commit the necessary resources for community-based service options, and (3) sustain collaborative action toward creating real choice for people with disabilities living in institutions. The report includes an executive summary, a "lessons learned" section, and conclusions and recommendations. The appendix describes the mission of the National Council on Disability. A full-length online version is also available.

Contact: National Council on Disability, 1331 F Street, N.W., Suite 850, Washington, DC 20004-1107, Telephone: (202) 272-2004 Secondary Telephone: (202) 272-2074 Fax: (202) 272-2022 E-mail: ncd@ncd.gov Web Site: http://www.ncd.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Communities, Community based services, Community programs, Deinstitutionalization, Disabilities, Discrimination, Federal courts, Institutionalization, Models, Service coordination, Special health care needs, State programs

Dicker S, Gordon E, Knitzer J. 2001. Improving the odds for the healthy development of young children in foster care. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 28 pp. (Promoting the emotional well-being of children and families, policy paper 2)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses what can be done to improve the physical, developmental, and emotional health of young children in foster care. It is organized into four sections. The first highlights the special risks that these children face. The second section offers reasons for focusing deliberate, strategic policy and practice attention on improving the well-being of young children in foster care. Section three identifies five strategies that some service providers, courts, and their partners are using to improve the emotional and developmental status of young children, providing examples of each strategy in action. The final section identifies action steps that child welfare professionals, judges, attorneys and other court personnel, service providers, policymakers, and advocates can take to enhance the healthy development of young children in foster care. Two appendices are included: federal building blocks to improve the development of young children in foster care and program contact information. Endnotes are provided.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Child development, Child welfare, Courts, Early intervention services, Emotional development, Federal programs, Foster care, Foster children, Physical development, Program descriptions, Program development, State programs, Young children

Isaac NE, Enos VP. 2001. Documenting domestic violence: How health care providers can help victims. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, 5 pp. (Research in brief)

Annotation: This brief provides information on how a well-documented medical record can strengthen domestic violence cases when they are brought to court and how e-health professionals can improve the admissibility of evidence and strengthen the cases of domestic violence victims. The brief explains why thorough documentation is important, overcoming barriers to good documentation, what the records lack, and what health professionals can do. A model protocol currently under development is described. The brief includes a diagram explaining how to document injury. Contacts for additional information and resources are provided, and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Institute of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-2942 Fax: (202) 307-6394 Web Site: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Courts, Domestic violence, Evidence, Medical records

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children. 1996. The juvenile court. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children, 160 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.). (The future of children; v. 6, no. 3, Winter 1996)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" analyzes the role and procedures of the juvenile courts, including how they handle juvenile crime, status offenses such as truancy, and child abuse and neglect. Final chapters discuss current trends and make recommendations to improve the system.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Family support services, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Statistics

Pires SA, ed., Board on Children and Families, National Forum on the Future of Children and Families. 1993. International Child Welfare Systems: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 87 pp.

Annotation: This workshop, with participants from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Denmark, France, and Germany, compared the status of children, and the practices of the child welfare systems in the different countries. The participants discussed such topics as the role of the individual and the state, characteristics of children in care and the prevalence and types of residential and other out-of-home care, child abuse and neglect and how it is handled, and training of social welfare workers.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child care, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children's rights, Cultural factors, Evaluation, Government role, Interagency cooperation, International health, International programs, Juvenile courts, Out of home care, Service delivery systems

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 1991. Symposium on judicial needs relating to child sexual abuse. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the increasing numbers of child sexual abuse cases that are appearing in civil and criminal courts, resulting in an increased need for training of investigators and prosecutors. The report is divided into eight sections. Background of the problem and an overview of the federal efforts of the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Office for Victims of Crime are examined. Judicial issues include the selection process, the attitudes and education of judges are also examined. A section is devoted to the investigation and prosecution of child sexual abuse cases. The remaining sections focus on the issues of children as witnesses, expert witnesses, the needs and issues of the defendants and the child victims. The appendix includes a bibliography.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: 20-10020.

Keywords: Children, Courts, Judges, Legal issues, Sexual abuse

Franz JP. 1990. Facing the challenge: The Children's Code and families headed by parents with mental retardation. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, Supported Parenting Project, 64 pp.

Annotation: This manual, directed to an audience of people who provide care for parents with mental retardation, is designed to provide an overview of the way the Wisconsin juvenile court works, as controlled in part by the Children's Code of the Wisconsin statutes. The manual presents basic procedures, terminology, and principles involved in juvenile court actions to make it easier to work with court-related staff and to understand how court actions can affect a family. The manual discusses the temporary custody stage, the jurisdictional and dispositional stages, and post-dispositional procedures. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, 201 West Washington Avenue, Suite 110, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (888) 332-1677 Secondary Telephone: (608) 266-7826 Fax: (608) 267-3906 E-mail: help@wcdd.org Web Site: http://www.wcdd.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Court decisions, Courts, Developmental disabilities, Legal issues, Parent rights, Parenting, Wisconsin

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1960-1969. Juvenile court statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 9 v. (Children's Bureau statistical series; nos. 61 (covers 1959), 65 (covers 1960), 69 (covers 1961), 73 (covers 1962), 79 (covers 1963), 83 (covers 1964), 85 (covers 1965), 90 (covers 1966), 93 (covers 1967))

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1958. Children and youth: Their health and welfare. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, [99] pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 363-1957)

Wood H. 1940. Children in the courts: Juvenile-court statistics year ended December 31, 1937 and Federal juvenile offenders year ended June 30, 1937—Tenth report. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 88 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no.250)

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1936-39. Juvenile-court statistics and federal juvenile offenders. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, Irregular. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 232 (Seventh, 1933); no. 245, (Ninth, 1935-36))

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.