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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (25 total).

National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2016. A report on the status of fetal and infant mortality review in the United States 2015 = U.S. fetal and infant mortality review: 2015 status report. Washington, DC: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of state and local Fetal and Infant Mortality (FIMR) coordinators about their FIMR team structure, process, and activities. Contents include information about operations at the local level to examine medical, nonmedical, and systems-related factors and circumstances contributing to fetal and infant deaths. Information about FIMR and child death review collaboration is also included. Survey results are provided in a set of tables following the narrative. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, County programs, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Injury prevention, Local initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program coordination, Systems development, Teamwork

Southeastern Michigan Health Association, Center for Population Health. 2016. Livingston County's Road to Community Health: Oral health. [Howell, MI]: Livingston County Department of Public Health, 2 pp. (Livingston County's road to community health series, no. 7)

Annotation: This issue examines the oral health status of residents in Livingston County, Michigan, as reported in the community health status assessment, compared to state and national data. Topics include the percentage of residents who did not have a dental visit in the past year, the percentage who did not have dental insurance by income, and recommendations for and use of oral health care services among children.

Contact: Livingston County Department of Public Health, 2300 E Grand River Avenue, Suite 102, Howell, MI 48843, Telephone: (517) 546-9850 Fax: (517) 546-6995 Web Site: https://www.livgov.com/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, County programs, Dental care, Dental insurance, Health care utilization, Health status, Local government, Low income groups, Michigan, Needs assessment, Oral health, Preventive health services

Crall JJ, Illum J, Martinez A, Pourat N. 2016. An innovative project breaks down barriers to oral health care for vulnerable children in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief describes a project to improve oral health care for young children at 12 federally qualified health center clinic sites with co-located oral health and primary care services in Los Angeles County, California. Contents include program goals to reduce barriers to obtaining oral health care for infants and young children from birth through age 5 and strategies and interventions to meet program goals. Topics include infrastructure, practice-management technical assistance, training, quality-improvement learning collaboratives, community systems development, and policy analysis. Additional topics include the location and characteristics of participating clinics, the number of visits for children by project year and quarter, and policy implications.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Clinics, Community health centers, County programs, Dental care, Infants, Local initiatives, Oral health, Policy development, Primary care, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Service integration, Systems development, Technical assistance, Training, Work force, Young children

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2016. Crosswalk between public health accreditation and health impact assessment. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document describes how health impact assessment (HIA) can be used as a tool for local health departments to promote community health improvement while contributing to documentation that demonstrates conformity to the Public Health Accreditation Board's (PHAB) Standards and Measures. Contents include background on HIA and accreditation and a crosswalk between PHAB standards and measures and HIA projects by domain. Examples of health data summaries, committee minutes, dated distribution lists, attendance logs, brochures, flyers, website screen prints, news releases, posters, and policies that can be used during the accreditation process are included.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, Assessment, City health agencies, County health agencies, Data collection, Health promotion, Measures, Program improvement, Public health agencies, Public health programs, Standards

Kemmerer C, Runnels L, Calondra T, Snebold L. 2014. Conversations with local health departments: Parenting education and skills-building program implementation capacity. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief describes local health department (LHDs) readiness and workforce capacity and identifies opportunities and challenges related to supporting and implementing parenting education and skills-building programs, specifically Legacy for Children. Contents include information about the 2012 Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Survey, focus groups, and results. Topics include community needs assessment and intervention fit, stakeholder engagement, planning and assessment, workforce development and support, monitoring and evaluation, and sustainability. Discussion, implications, and recommendations are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website. Document Number: NA581PDF.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, MCH research, Model programs, National surveys, Parenting education, State programs

Hillsborough County [Community] Violence Prevention Collaborative. 2014. 2014-2015 strategic plan. [Tampa, FL]: Hillsborough County, 68 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a public health approach to preventing violence in Hillsborough County, FL. Topics include national best practices and lessons learned for preventing violence, efforts to identify and prioritize risk and protective factors for decreasing community violence and increasing a sense of safety among youth in Hillsborough County, and successful intervention and enforcement strategies.

Contact: Hillsborough County, Community Violence Prevention Collaborative, County Center, 26th Floor, 601 E. Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, FL Telephone: (813) 274-6789 E-mail: vpc@hillsboroughcounty.org Web Site: http://www.hillsboroughcounty.org/index.aspx?NID=3222 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, County programs, Florida, Injury prevention, Law enforcement, Local initiatives, Protective factors, Public health, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, Safety programs, Strategic plans, Violence prevention

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Staying resilient in hard times: Local programs and services for women, children, youth, and families. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from a survey to determine local health department (LHD) best practices for preserving services and programs to meet the needs of pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents in light of economic downturn and changing health care system landscape. The brief focuses on the constellation of programs and services provided by LHDs and the overlap of those programs and services with health care services covered as essential benefits under the Affordable Care Act. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Health care reform, Health services delivery, MCH research, Model programs, National surveys, Organizational change, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

O'Hare W. 2014. Rural children increasingly rely on Medicaid and state child health insurance programs for health insurance. [Washington, DC]: First Focus, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on differences in health insurance coverage and type among children residing in metropolitan areas vs. those residing outside of these areas. Topics include child health insurance trends from 2000 to 2012; source of health insurance; children who lack health insurance; children in families with low incomes; and differences by state, county, and congressional district.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children's Health Insurance Programs, Comparative analysis, County programs, Health insurance, Low income groups, Medicaid, Metropolitan areas, Rural population, State programs, Trends

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) champions: The local MCAH capacity building project experience. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a multi-year demonstration project to build local health department's (LHD's) technical knowledge and leadership abilities for maternal and child health through blended learning techniques including in-person capacity building trainings and virtual coaching, networking, and peer-to-peer sharing. Contents include information about the project framework and outcomes, participating LHDs, lessons learned, and recommendations for future capacity building projects is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Leadership, Local MCH programs, MCH training, Networking, Organizational change, Peer education, Public health infrastructure, Technical assistance, Work force

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2013. Staying resilient in hard times: Local collaboration for women, children, youth and families . Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from the Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health 2012 Survey, which was conducted as part of a larger research project to determine local health department best practices for implementing services and programs that meet the needs of pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents in light of the economic downturn and a changing health care system landscape. The brief presents the landscape of existing and potential maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) partners in local jurisdictions, with the goal of providing insight into the extent to which MCAH staff collaborate with partners and their interest in maintaining or expanding these collaborations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, Collaboration, County health agencies, Health care reform, MCH research, Model programs, National surveys, Public private partnerships

Jackson County Prenatal Task Force. 2013. 2013 strategic action plan. Jackson, MI: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines goals, outcome measures, and strategies to reduce infant mortality and improve infant health in Jackson County, Mississippi. Contents include data on infant mortality, adolescent and unintended pregnancy, racial disparities, prenatal care, smoking during pregnancy, infant death due to positional asphyxia, and infant sleep position and environment. The plan presents strategies to improve women's sexual health and experience of care before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as strategies to reduce the number of infant deaths due to positional asphyxia.

Contact: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, One Jackson Square, 9th Floor, Jackson, MI Telephone: (517) 780-7306 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, County programs, Fetal death, Goals, Infant care, Infant death, Infant health, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Measures, Mississippi, Prenatal care, Program development, Program improvement, Strategic plans

Murphey D, Redd Z, Moodie S, Knewstub D, Humble J, Bell K, Cooper M. 2012. Assessing the status and needs of children and youth in the national capital region (rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Child Trends, 165 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a comprehensive, baseline assessment of the status of children, adolescents, and young adults (from birth to age 24) in the National Capital Region (NCR), which includes the District of Columbia, two independent cities and four counties in Virginia, and two counties in Maryland, The report is organized in the following indicator sections: demographic characteristics; pregnancy and birth outcomes; infant, child, and adolescent health and safety; economic well-being; child welfare; and education. For each indicator, the report cites differences evident among the various jurisdictions of the NCR, as well as notable disparities along lines of gender, race and Hispanic origin, or age. The evidence on what works to improve conditions for youth is also summarized for many of the indicators. The report concludes with a summary of knowledge gaps and comments about interpretation.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cities, County programs, District of Columbia, Health planning, Health status, Maryland, Needs assessment, Regional planning, Statistical data, Virginia

Virginia Home Visiting Consortium. [2011]. Directory of Viriginia home visiting programs. (Richmond, VA): Virginia Home Visiting Consortium,

Annotation: This website provides a Virginia state atlas with links to home visiting programs in all five of the state's regions. Users can select from an alphabetical list of counties and independent cities within the Commonwealth of Virginia to obtain contact information. The website also provides access to web-based training modules for home visitors and supervisors; links to state and national programs and resources; and announcements about new regulations, guidelines, and materials for use with families participating in home visiting programs.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, Harrisonburg, VA , Telephone: (540) 568-5251 Fax: (540) 568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconsortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: County programs, Directories, Home visiting, State programs, Virginia

Cooper JL, Aratani Y, Masi R, Banghart P, Dababnah S, Douglas-Hall A, Tavares A, Stagman S. 2010. Unclaimed children revisited: California case study. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 143 pp.

Annotation: The California Case Study (CCS) is a component of Unclaimed Children Revisited -- a study of policies across the United States that promote or inhibit the delivery of high-quality mental health services and support to children, youth, and families. The CCS, which focuses on 11 counties across the state of California, includes: (1) an analysis of California state policy with special attention given to reform policies such as the Mental Health Services Act; (2) 11 in-depth county case studies that illustrate aspects of effective mental health service delivery and policy; and (3) a fiscal analysis that compares the efficacy of different financial approaches. The study includes sections on lessons learned; culturally- and linguistically-competent services; prevention and early intervention within a public health framework; and information technology and outcome measurement. An overview of policies and legislation mentioned by system leaders is included in the appendices.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Case studies, Children, Comparative analysis, County programs, Families, Health policy, Mental health services, State legislation, State programs, Youth

Alabama Department of Children's Affairs. 2010. Alabama children's needs assessment update. [Montgomery, AL]: Alabama Department of Children's Affairs, 322 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment reflects efforts at the county level to ensure that children and families in Alabama have access to needed services and programs. The assessment begins with a list of 10 desired results for Alabama children, as follows: children are safe; children are healthy; children are ready for school; children are successful in school; children stay out of trouble; children transition successfully to adulthood; families are strong and stable; families are hopeful and positively engaged in their children's development; communities are safe, engaged, and supportive; and communities are thriving. The needs assessment then expands on progress made toward achieving each one.

Contact: Alabama Department of Children's Affairs, 135 South Union Street, Suite 215, Montgomery, AL 36130, Telephone: (334) 353-2700 Fax: (334) 353-2701 E-mail: info@children.alabama.gov Web Site: http://www.children.alabama.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Alabama, Child development, Children, Communities, County programs, Families, Health services, Needs assessments, Parent child relations, Programs, Safety, School readiness, Social services, Transition planning

Overton L. 2006. Simplify, automate, and follow the leader: Lessons on expanding health coverage for children. Oakland, CA: California Healthcare Foundation, 9 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief synthesizes key lessons from successful initiatives at the state, county, and community level that are working to reduce the percentage of uninsured children in California. The brief identifies three main strategies for making such initiatives successful: (1) simplify, (2) automate, and (3) follow the leader. The brief elaborates on each of these strategies and also discusses obstacles to overcome and provides a conclusion. Brief case studies of two programs are provided as a sidebar. Endnotes are included.

Contact: California HealthCare Foundation, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 400, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 238-1040 Fax: (510) 238-1388 Web Site: http://www.chcf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Child health, Community programs, County programs, Health insurance, Initiatives, Local programs, State programs, Uninsured persons

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2005. Operational definition of a functional local health department. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes the functions of local health departments to assist citizens, residents, and elected officials understand what can reasonably be expected from governmental public health in their communities and how to hold them accountable. The definitions are divided into ten standards and include monitoring health status, protecting people from health problems and hazards, informing the public, engaging the community, developing public health policies and plans, law and regulation enforcement, helping people receive health services, maintaining a competent public health workforce, evaluating and improving programs and interventions, and contributing to and applying the evidence base of public health. A brief list of references is provided.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, City health agencies, Community health services, Consumer education materials, County health agencies, Health policy, Health promotion, Public health, Public health programs

Trenholm C. 2004. Expanding coverage for children: The Santa Clara County Children's Health Initiative. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 4 pp. (Issue brief; no. 3)

Annotation: This issue brief is based on Mathematica Policy Research's evaluation of the Santa Clara County Children's Health Initiative, an effort launched in June 2001 to extend health coverage to all uninsured children in Santa Clara County, California. The brief discusses the problem of gaps in coverage, how to meet the need for coverage, findings at a glance, and implications for the future. The evaluation itself is also described. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures within the brief.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, County programs, Health insurance, Initiatives, Uninsured persons

Galbraith L. [2003]. Proactive funding strategies for home visitation: A resource for counties. Washington, DC: National Association of Counties, 19 pp.

Annotation: This primer aims to provide home visitation advocates with strategies to attain long-term funding for programs. The primer addresses the following issues: (1) How do I make a financial argument for home visitation? (2) What else should I know about making an investment in home visitation? (3) What are my home visit options? (4) What are the costs associated with home visitation? (5) What are the sources of funding utilized by home visitation programs? (6) state funding, and (7) county funding. Three appendices include information on how to contact home visitation programs, resources for locating federal funding, and funding sources. The report concludes with a list of endnotes.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, County programs, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, State programs

McConnochie KM. 2003. The in-home hospital-level care experiment: In Rochester, New York. Rochester, NY: Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the home nursing program in Monroe County, New York. The issues addressed are as follows: (1) the potential for implementing home nurse enhancement of primary care (HNEPC) on a community-wide basis, (2) the acceptance of HNEPC by families and providers, (3) the net impact of HNEPC on both hospitalization of episodes eligible for randomization and on overall community hospitalization rates, (4) the cost of care for episodes randomized to different groups, and (5) comparison of quality of care for illness episodes in the treatment group and in the control group. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community Based Health Services, Cost Effectiveness, County Health Agencies, Health Care Utilization, Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Home Visiting Services, Infants, MCH Research, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Quality Assurance, Research, School Age Children, Toddlers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.