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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Flynn S, Duffy J. 2013. Patterns of family planning services, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among 15-19 year olds enrolled in SC Medicaid. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an analysis of contraceptive use and pregnancy patterns among low-income adolescents on Medicaid in South Carolina. Conducted by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the South Carolina Budget and Control Board, the report reveals the percentage of teens who became pregnant who used no birth control, or less reliable forms of birth control, and suggests that offering a different type of birth control to teens on Medicaid might help delay pregnancy and childbirth. Based on longitudinal data from one to five years for each teen, the report compares and contrasts contraceptive use, birth control methods, and rates of pregnancy according to the participants' age and race. The report concludes with recommendations to help reduce the teen pregnancy rate among low-income adolescents. in South Carolina.

Contact: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 771-7700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 849-0455 Fax: (803) 771-6916 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancysc.org Web Site: http://www.teenpregnancysc.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Comparative analysis, Contraceptive use, Data, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Prevention, South Carolina, State initiatives

Kavanaugh ML, Anderson RM. 2013. Contraception and beyond: The health benefits of services provided at family planning centers. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes research on the health benefits associated with services provided at family planning facilities, whether directly related to contraceptive care or to benefits resulting from other services received during a family planning visit. Drawing on an extensive literature review conducted in 2012, the report examines the health benefits associated with delaying, planning, and spacing pregnancies; the noncontraceptive health benefits of contraceptive methods (for example, reduced cancer risk and treatment for menstrual-related symptoms and disorders); and the health benefits of receiving noncontraceptive services at Family Planning Clinics. The appendices include a list of the studies and journal articles reviewed.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Contraceptive use, Family centered services, Family planning, Health services, Literature reviews, Maternal health, Research

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2013. Contraception calling: Why aren't more young women listening?. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses a 2013 nationally representative survey of adolescents and young adults about what women think about contraception. Topics include pregnancy intention versus behavior, what method of contraception single women use, contraception concerns, how their choice of method was made, and what contraception methods young women want.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Contraception, Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive use, Family planning, Surveys, Women's health, Young women

Avellino L, Eisler A. 2013. Keep it simple: Linking teens to sexual health care. Balitmore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Atlanta, GA: CAI Global ,

Annotation: This 45-minute module is designed to help male and female adolescents ages 15-19 connect with health professionals who can provide contraception care and reproductive health care. The module addresses the question of why adolescents do not typically access such services, including lack of knowledge about their right to care, available services, and the location of health professionals in the community who can meet their needs. The module includes a short motion graphic that can be shared online as a stand-alone product to facilitate increased access, improve awareness about contraceptive methods available to adolescents, and promote linkages to care. The graphic is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials, Training materials

ECRI Institute. 2013. AHRQ healthcare horizon scanning system: Potential high-impact interventions report–Priority Area 12: Pregnancy, including preterm birth. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Healthcare Horizon Scanning System as a systematic process to identify and monitor target technologies and innovations in health care and to create an inventory of target technologies that have the highest potential for impact on clinical care, the health care system, patient outcomes, and costs. It also describes its role as a tool for the public to identify and find information on new health care technologies and interventions. This report discusses two topics, the Preconception Care System for improving health outcomes in pregnancy (Gabby) and the use of vending machine dispensers for emergency oral contraceptive (Plan B One-Step) to prevent pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive use, Medical technology, Medical technology, Oral contraception, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Research methodology

Guttmacher Institute. 2012. Facts on publicly funded contraceptive services in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on publicly funded contraceptive services in the United States. Topics include (1) who needs contraceptive services, (2) who needs publicly funded services, (3) is public funding available, (4) who receives publicly funded services, (5) where are publicly funded services provided, (6) Medicaid family planning expansions, (7) what services do publicly funded centers offer, (8) publicly funded centers' role as safety net providers, and (9) what impact do family planning services have,

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive use, Family planning, Financing, Health services, Medicaid, Public health services

Singh S, Darroch JE. 2012. Adding it up: Costs and benefits of contraceptive services--Estimates for 2012. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute; United Nations Population Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presents 2012 estimates of the numbers and proportion of women in the developing world using modern methods and in need of modern contraception, as well as the cost and impact of meeting this need. The estimates presented in the report incorporate survey data on need for and use of contraception together with updated 2012 estimates of the direct costs of providing contraceptive services. They also draw on updated estimates of pregnancies and maternal deaths. Figures indicate the number of married and unmarried women in developing countries who are using or in need of modern contraception, and the increase in contraception in selected countries since 2000. Data sources include the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), supplemented by surveys carried out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Reproductive Health Surveys), United Nations Children’s Fund Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys) and independent national surveys

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Contraceptive use, Data, Developing countries, International health, National surveys, Women's health

Wildsmith E, Manlove J, Welti K, Field S. 2012. Contraceptive service use among Hispanics: Variation across contextual characteristics. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 15 pp.

Annotation: These research findings on the variation in use of contraceptive services among Hispanics were presented during the National Survey of Family Growth Research Conference held in October 2012. The findings highlight individual variation in contraceptive use based on acculturation, country of origin, socioeconomic status, and community characteristics (including access to services). The data sources, research sample, measures, and methods are outlined, and findings are presented in numerical and descriptive formats. Future efforts to increase the use of contraceptive services among Hispanics are also summarized.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Contraceptive use, Data, Hispanic Americans, Research

Guttmacher Institute. 2011. Facts on induced abortion in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about induced abortion in the United States. Topics include incidence of abortion, categories of women who have abortions, contraceptive use, providers and services, abortion via medication, safety of abortion, and law and policy.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Age factors, Contraceptive use, Income factors, Legislation, Public policy, Racial factors, Safety

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2011. Update on emergency contraception. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 16 pp. (Clinical proceedings)

Annotation: This monograph provides information on the use of emergency contraception (EC) in the United States. It includes background information and statistics on unintended pregnancies and explains the laws regulating access to emergency contraception (including over-the-counter availability and regulatory status). The monograph describes the types of EC's available in the United States; provides an overview of the literature on the effectiveness of EC's; and discusses the various mechanisms of EC action that prevent pregnancy. Safety issues; the impact of EC's on risk-taking; the impact of EC's on the rate of unintended pregnancies; and the barriers to EC access and use are also discussed. The monograph also examines the role of clinicians and pharmacists as consultants to patients.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive use, Emergency contraception, Regulations, Unplanned pregnancy

Welti K, Wildsmith E, Manlove J. 2011. Trends and recent estimates: Contraceptive use among U.S. teens and young adults. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 7 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief provides information on contraceptive use among adolescents (ages 15-19) and young adults (ages 20-24). Drawing on data collected from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), the brief summarizes survey respondents' answers to questions related to their use of contraception, including whether or not they had ever used contraception, what type of contraception they used, and whether or not they used it consistently. It also examines the differences in contraceptive use between teens and young adults and according to race and ethnicity. Data on the use of emergency contraceptives is included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Contraceptive use, National surveys, Research, Trends, Young adults

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2011. Birth control guide. [Silver Spring, MD]: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Office of Women's Health , 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide for consumers provides information about the different kinds of medicines and devices for birth control that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The guide includes an introduction to birth control and covers the following topics: barrier methods, hormonal methods, emergency contraception, implanted devices, and permanent methods for men and for women. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Office of Women's Health , WO Building 32, Room 2325, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (301) 796-9440 Fax: (301) 847-8604 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Contraception, Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive implants, Contraceptive use, Emergency contraception, Pregnancy, Prevention, Spanish language materials

Healthy Teen Network and Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2010. Opportunity knocks: Using teachable moments to convey safer sex messages to young people. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, multiple items.

Annotation: This educational toolkit is designed to help youth workers and other adults talk to young people about sex and contraceptive use. Contents include information about presentation design; goals, objectives, and agenda; slides; a supply list; a post-assessment survey; and a handout with role play scenarios. The kit also contains a document with information on creating a teachable moment, what youth should know, things to keep in mind before and during a conversation, and resources and referrals.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Communication skills, Contraceptive use, Primary prevention, Risk taking, Sexuality education

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. Facts on contraceptive use in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about contraceptive use in the United States. Topics include (1) who needs contraceptives, (2) who uses contraceptives, (3) which methods do women use, (4) adolescent contraceptive use, (5) trends in contraceptive use, and (6) who pays for contraception.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Contraceptive use, Costs, Reproductive heath, Trends, Women's health

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. An overview of minors' consent laws. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This document consists primary of a table that contains seven categories of state law that affect minors' right to receive medical care without parental consent. Highlights of the table are also presented in the following areas: contraceptive services, sexually transmitted infection services, prenatal care, adoption, medical care for a child, and abortion.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Adoption, Child health, Contraceptive use, Health services, Informed consent, Parental consent, Prenatal care, Sexually transmitted diseases, State legislation

Jaccard J. 2009. Unlocking the contraception conundrum: Reducing unplanned pregnancies in emerging adulthood. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 221 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reviews the major literature on contraceptive behavior among unmarried young adults in their twenties. It defines and examines aspects of contraceptive behavior and organizes this examination by applying a general theory of human behavior at the individual level and in the couple dynamic to the study of contraceptive behavior that examines (1) the link between intention and behavior, (2) why some people intend to perform a contraceptive behavior and others do not, (3) personal value and mental health factors, and (4) environmental influences. The report makes recommendations to organizations and contraceptive use promotion programs.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Contraceptive use, Literature reviews, Prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Young adults

Guttmacher Institute. 2009. A real-time look at the impact of the recession on women's family planning and pregnancy decisions. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 9 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the impact of the economic downturn on women's fertility-related needs, behavior, and attitudes and also on their ability to obtain family planning services. It examines (1) how women feel the current economy has affected them; (2) changes in preferences concerning whether or when to have a child; (3) women's attitudes toward contraception; (4) patterns in contraceptive method choices and sources of payment for contraceptive prescriptions; (5) challenges women face in obtaining family planning services; and (6) connections that women see between the economy, their fertility, and their families' economic well-being. The data for the report comes from a national, online survey of 947 women aged 18-34 conducted by the Guttmacher Institute in 2009.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitude change, Contraceptive use, Economic factors, Family planning, Reproductive behavior, Women's health, Women's health services

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2008. Providers' perspectives: Perceived barriers to contraceptive use in youth and young adults—Final report. Washington DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines five key barriers to contraceptive use among adolescents and young adults and provides action steps that the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy could take to overcome these barriers. The information in the report is based on a literature review as well as on two advisory group meetings in which reproductive, pediatric, and family health professionals expored (1) barriers faced by health professionals and their clients related to preventing unintended pregnancy and using contraception consistently and (2) potential real-life solutions to overcome these barriers. The report provides background and current statistics and then presents information on the five barriers: (1) insufficient education for health professionals, (2) Insufficient opportunities for continuing education among health professionals, (3) high costs, difficulties with reimbursement, and lack of quality assurance, (4) Insufficient broad-based messages and information for consumers, and (5) confusion caused by shifting gender roles, coupled with limited access to reproductive health services for men. References are included for each section.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Barriers, Continuing education, Contraceptive use, Costs, Education, Health care services, Literature reviews, Prevention, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Reproductive health, Young adults

Frost J, Darroch JE, Remez L. 2008. Improving contraceptive use in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 8 pp. (In brief; 2008 series, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief report provides information about two surverys undertaken to identify possible strategies for improving contraceptive use in the United States. The report provides background information about unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use, key findings, and recommendations. Statistical data is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. References are included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Advocacy, Contraceptive use, Economic factors, Miscarriage, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.