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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (71 total).

March of Dimes. n.d.. Healthy babies: Chance or choice? A peer education approach. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes, 48 pp.

Annotation: This volume presents a joint project of the March of Dimes and the Future Homemakers of America, which trains adolescent to provide peer education to other adolescents on the subject of preventing birth defects. It discusses reports from peer educators, the problem of birth defects, facts about preventable problems and project possibilities, suggestions for getting started, communication techniques, and a list of do's and don'ts. The volume is illustrated with photographs and drawings.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Congenital abnormalities, Peer education

National Birth Defects Prevention Network. 2017. National birth defects prevention month. Houston, TX: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials and resources are designed to assist state program staff and others interested in promoting birth defects prevention during "January is Birth Defects Prevention Month." Contents include fact sheets, pamphlets, and posters about birth defects, preconception health, infections and immunizations, and healthy lifestyle. Topics include what you should know about birth defects, including congenital heart defects; folic acid and fetal alcohol syndrome; toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, and tips on preventing infections during pregnancy; and diabetes, smoking, and domestic violence. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 1321 Upland Drive, Suite 1561, Houston, TX 77043, E-mail: nbdpn@nbdpn.org Web Site: https://www.nbdpn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Gestational diabetes, Preconception care, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases. 2016–. Zika virus (upd.). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources for health care professionals, pregnant women, and others about zika virus disease. Contents include data; information for specific population groups; communication resources such as videos, fact sheets, posters, and infographics; and scientific resources including links to information collections by publisher, emergency bulletins, links to U.S. and international governmental resources, and a biomedical literature search tool. Topics include symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment; prevention; transmission and risks; areas with zika; and vector surveillance and control.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain diseases, Communicable disease control, Congenital abnormalities, Consumer education materials, Diagnosis, Disease prevention, Disease transmission, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Public awareness materials, Research, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Therapeutics, Virus diseases

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. [2013]. Birth defects: A tool kit. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, 18 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which is geared toward public health professionals, offers tips for effectively delivering messages about birth defects to a variety of audiences, including state and local public and environmental health professionals, decision makers, and the interested public. The toolkit can be used to help meet the communication goals set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. Topics include goals and guiding principles, environmental public health before and after tracking, the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network: a timeline, key messages and talking points, facts, a sample article, and social media examples.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Congenital abnormalities, Educational materials, Mass Media, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Public awareness materials, Public heath

Association of Public Health Laboratories. 2013. The newborn screening story: How one simple test changed lives, science, and health in America. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 95 pp.

Annotation: This book traces the evolution of newborn screening over the last 50 years, with stories from families affected by newborn screening conditions and portraits of the health professionals who support the newborn screening system. Contents include an outline of the origins of newborn screening, health implications of test results and the impact on treatment, the role of science and laboratory testing, how policy contributes to provide newborn screening, and how future screening research, practices, and policies can help improve the survival and growth of newborn infants.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9892398-0-6.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, History, Infant health, Neonatal mortality, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2013. State newborn screening and birth defects program roles in screening for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD). Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 11 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief provides recommendations for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) programs. The brief highlights efforts in Indiana, Michigan, New Jersey, and Utah to establish collaboration between programs, particularly newborn screening and birth defects programs, to effectively implement CCHD screening and follow-up. Topics include key elements of the state approaches, data considerations, and program challenges and successes. The role of the Title V MCH Services Block Grant is discussed.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Congenital abnormalities, Congenital heart defects, Indiana, Michigan, Neonatal screening, New Jersey, State programs, Title V programs, Utah

Axelrad D et al. 2013. America's children and the environment (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 494 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data on children's environmental health. Topics include (1) environments and contaminants such as air, indoor, drinking water, chemicals in food, contaminated lands, and climate change; (2) biomonitoring, such as lead, mercury, pcbs, and others; and (3) health concerns such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, neurodevelopomental disorders, obesity, and adverse birth outcomes. The report also covers birth defects and contaminants in schools and child care facilities. An appendix also describes the alignment of these indicators with Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. Pre-existing diabetes and pregnancy: Potential effects of uncontrolled diabetes. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This chart is intended for women who have diabetes and want to get pregnant. It provides information on the potential effects of uncontrolled diabetes before and during pregnancy. Tips on controlling blood sugar to help prevent problems and links to additional resources on diabetes and pregnancy are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Congenital abnormalities, Infants, Preconception, Pregnancy in diabetics, Self care, Women

Guttmacher AE. 2012. Birth defects: The role of research. [Rockville, MD]: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1 video (12 min., 52 sec.).

Annotation: In this video presentation, NICHD Director Alan E. Guttmacher, M.D., describes the role of research in understanding, preventing, and treating birth defects. In his talk, Dr. Guttmacher provides some basic facts about birth defects and recounts how research led to the discovery that the vitamin folic acid could reduce the chances of neural tube defects. He also describes the role of model organisms, such as the zebrafish, in understanding developmental processes as an important step in uncovering the origins of birth defects. The video concludes with an introduction to the new technologies of systems biology and chemical genomics, which promise to yield new insights leading to greater understanding of birth defects and their eventual prevention and treatment.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Congenital abnormalities, Folic acid, Genomics, Neural tube defects, Prevention, Research

National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics. 2012. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) factsheet. [Lutherville, MD]: National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a procedure to analyze cell-free fetal DNA circulating in maternal blood as a noninvasive prenatal screening and testing effort for trisomy 21 and other fetal chromosome abnormalities. It outlines test characteristics, detection rate and accuracy, reporting results and their implications for pregnant women, testing costs and insurance coverage, what to ask laboratories offering the test, performance comparison to other forms of prenatal testing or screening, counseling women about screening and testing options, and general background.

Contact: National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 2360 West Joppa Road, Suite 320, Lutherville, MD 21093, Telephone: (410) 583-0600 Fax: (410) 583-0520 E-mail: info@nchpeg.org Web Site: http://www.nchpeg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Down syndrome, Genetic screening, Prenatal care, Trisomy

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2011. Fact sheet: State birth defects performance measures [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights innovative and effective ways that state Title V agencies utilize birth defects surveillance systems to improve maternal and child health. Eleven states and territories identified in the fact sheet. The state performance measure and the objective or intent are described.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, State initiatives, Surveillance, Title V programs

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2011. Strategic plan 2011-2015. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. The report describes the center's vision for the future and its commitment to achieving important health outcomes and discusses its background and history, partners and constituents, mandates and authorities, public health approach, and relationship between priorities and Healthy People goals. Also presented are the following divisions and their strategic plans: Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Division of Blood Disorders, and Division of Human Development and Disability.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Federal agencies, Human development, Public health, Strategic plans

Lewis JA, Freda MC, Williams JK. 2010. Genetic issues for perinatal nurses. (2nd ed.). White Plains, NY: March of Dimes, 70 pp. (March of Dimes nursing module)

Annotation: This learning module is designed to increase nurses' knowledge of genetics and to provide a sound baseline on which to build nursing care for pregnant women, their infants, and their families. The module includes an update of genetic discoveries for inherited diseases and birth defects, as well as discussion of genetics-related ethical issues and nursing responsibilities for reproducing families. Introductory materials describe the module format, student evaluation, independent study, facilitated study, cognitive objectives, and expected practice outcomes. Key concepts, a glossary, and pre- and postinstructional measurement sections are also included. Section topics include basic genetic information, principles of inheritance: Mendel's laws, principles of nontraditional inheritance patterns, multifactorial inheritance, the importance of genetic family history, genetic screening, prevention of birth defects, and genetic testing. Additional sections review genetic counseling, nursing and the future of genetics. Additional sections include clinical applications, group discussion items, an independent study test, an independent study application, references, and other supplementary materials. The module has been approved for continuing education credits for registered nurses in New York and California.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com $20.00, plus shipping and handling of $3.40. Document Number: ISBN 9780865251267.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Educational materials, Genetics education, Nurse midwives, Nursing education, Professional education

Milwaukee Health Department. 2010. Infant mortality. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department,

Annotation: This website provides information about infant mortality in Milwaukee. It includes an overview of infant mortality and discusses leading causes, other factors affecting the infant mortality rate, and Fetal Infant Mortality Review. Links to additional infant mortality resources are provided.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Infant mortality, Premature infants, Racial factors, Risk factors, SIDS, State surveys, Wisconsin

Osterman MJK, Martin JA, Menacker F. 2009. Expanded health data from the new birth certificate, 2006. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 24 pp. (National vital statistics reports; v. 58, no. 5)

Annotation: This report presents 2006 data on new checkbox items exclusive to the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. Information is shown for checkboxes in the following categories: (1) risk factors in the pregnancy, (2) obstetric procedures, (3) characteristics of labor and delivery, (4) method of delivery, (5) abnormal conditions of the newborn, and (6) congenital abnormalities of the newborn. Methods, results, and a discussion are presented.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth certificates, Childbirth, Congenital abnormalities, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Risk factors, Statistical data

Watson T, Fertig A. 2008. Minimum drinking age laws and infant health outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 44 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14118)

Annotation: Using data from the National Vital Statistics for the years 1978-1988 and the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY), this paper evaluates the consequences of minimum drinking age laws (MLDA) on poor birth outcomes. The paper provides background and discusses previous literature and data, presents the empirical strategy, discusses the effect of MLDA laws on birth outcomes (including birthweight, prematurity, and congenital anomalies) and on the composition of births (i.e., the composition of maternal and paternal characteristics and changes in drinking and sexual behavior associated with MLDA laws), evidence from NLSY, and the effect of MLDA on prenatal behaviors.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available to subscribers from the website; $5.00 for non-subscribers..

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Congenital abnormalities, Infant health, Legislation, Low birthweight, Pregnancy outcome, Prematurity

Biobank Feasibility Expert Panel. 2007. Feasibility study for a statewide biobank to study preterm births and birth defects: A report to the Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes 4 discussions held by a 21 member panel during 2007 concerning the feasibility of a biobank in Connecticut and the value it might add to the study of preterm births and birth defects. Biobank models; funding sources; possible increases in research potential; affordability, ethical, legal, and social issues; and the likely public and private perceptions of such a bank all receive examination. Findings and recommendations conclude the report.

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 410 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-8000 E-mail: webmaster.dph@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Bioethics, Budgets, Congenital abnormalities, Connecticut, Genetic markers, Genetics, Low birthweight, Prenatal screening, Preterm birth, State programs

Elliott K, Segal LM, Juliano C, Mandel J, Hearne SA. 2005. Birth defects and developmental disabilities: The search for causes and cures. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 31 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report presents an overview of major birth defects and developmental disabilities (autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and learning disabilities), as well as an assessment of some recent public health successes and a look at several ongoing challenges. Conclusions, recommendations, and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes one appendix: a glossary of terms and acronyms.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Cerebral palsy, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Learning disabilities, Public health

National Governor's Association, Center for Best Practices. 2004. Healthy babies: Efforts to improve birth outcomes and reduce high risk births. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report describes efforts that states can make to improve birth outcomes. The report presents a summary of the problem of poor birth outcomes in the United States, explains the meaning of poor birth outcome, discusses the costs of poor birth outcomes, provides recommendations for improving poor birth outcomes and reducing costs associated with high-risk births, explains how specific states are using Medicaid to provide family planning services, discusses ways that states can help reduce the use of harmful substances, and offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report concludes with resources for improving birth outcomes and a list of endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Childbirth, Congenital abnormalities, Costs, Family planning, High risk infants, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Low birthweight infants, Maternal mortality, Medicaid, Pregnancy, Premature infants, State programs, Substance abusing pregnant women

Sever LE, ed. 2004. Guidelines for conducting birth defects surveillance. Atlanta, GA: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 627 pp.

Annotation: These technical guidelines are designed to serve as a first step in the documentation of the process of developing and promoting the use of standards and guidelines for state birth defects surveillance programs in the United States. The technical guidelines provide a way of improving the quality of birth defects surveillance data, which can make the data more useful for research and can encourage the use of such data to link children with birth defects to needed services, and for the evaluation of such services. The guidelines consist of chapters covering the fundamental aspects of developing, planning, implementing, and conducting surveillance for birth defects and using the resulting data.

Contact: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 1321 Upland Drive, Suite 1561, Houston, TX 77043, E-mail: nbdpn@nbdpn.org Web Site: https://www.nbdpn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Congenital abnormalities, Data, Guidelines, Health services, Manuals, Population surveillance, State programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.