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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (55 total).

Diaz de Ortiz M. n.d.. Caguas Crippled Children Service Network [Final report]. Caguas, PR: Caguas Regional Hospital, 33 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop an optimum habilitation and/or rehabilitation process for children (ages birth to 21 years) with special health needs, within Puerto Rico's Caguas Health Region. The principal outcomes of this project were the development of an electronic central register for patients with special health needs in the Caguas Health Region, and the interagency work agreement and interagency referral form, which have enabled project staff and Pediatric Center personnel to share information and coordinate services with other government service providers from central and local levels. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198901.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Chronically Ill, Collaboration of Care, Community-Based Health Care, Confidentiality, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Habilitation, Home Visiting, Referrals, Rehabilitation

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

Malvin J, Daniel S, Brindis CD. 2015. California's Confidential Health Information Act (SB 138): Implementation readiness among health insurers and health plans. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a study to identify operational issues and solutions related to the implementation of California's Confidential Health Information Act (Senate Bill 138), a law to address the privacy concerns of individuals insured as dependents on a parent's or partner's health plan. Topics include legal gaps that led to the new legislation, findings from telephone interviews with health insurance carriers and health plans, and an analysis of website content related to privacy practices.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Confidentiality, Health insurance, Organizational change, Policy development, Social change, State legislation, Transition to independent living

Lee H, Warren A, Gill L. 2015. Cheaper, faster, better: Are state administrative data the answer? The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start second annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 items. (OPRE report 2015-09)

Annotation: This report details the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) process of acquiring administrative vital records and Medicaid data from 20 states and more than 40 state agencies. MIHOPE-Strong Start examines the effectiveness of home visiting services on improving birth and maternal health outcomes for women who are enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as well as their effectiveness at reducing costly health care encounters. The study relies on administrative data to measure infant and maternal health, health care use, and cost outcomes. The MIHOPE-Strong Start experience sheds light on the process of acquiring permission to access such data.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative problems, Children's Health Insurance Program, Confidentiality, Costs, Data collection, Health care utilization, Health status, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Measures, Medicaid, Multimedia, Outcome and process assessment, Program evaluation

English A, Summers R, Lewis J, Coleman C. 2015. Confidentiality, third-party billing, and the health insurance claims process: Implications for Title X. Washington, DC: National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association,

Annotation: This white paper provides background on the importance of confidentiality in family planning settings, the role of Title X, and the health care delivery environment, particularly as a result of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The paper discusses disclosure requirements and confidentiality protections in the HIPAA Privacy Rule and state medical privacy laws as well as in the laws related to the primary sources of revenue for Title X-funded health centers—the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Section 330 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) program, Medicaid, and commercial health insurance. The paper also highlights examples of targeted approaches in several states that may provide confidentiality protection in the billing and health insurance claims process, including existing laws and policies and pending legislation.

Contact: National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association, 1627 K Street, N.W., 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 293-3114 E-mail: info@nfprha.org Web Site: http://www.nfprha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Confidentiality, Health care reform, Health insurance, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public Health Service Act, Title X, Reimbursement, State legislation, Young adults

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. 2015. Federal health IT strategic plan 2015–2020. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Secretary, 50 pp.

Annotation: This plan describes how the federal government views the health information technology (health IT) landscape and articulates federal values and priorities. It also identifies government actions that will be most impactful in the future. Topics include the federal health IT vision and mission, principles, and goals for improving health and well-being and progressing to a person-centered infrastructure; how health IT helps users manage systemic transformation; federal efforts to modernize the nation's health IT infrastructure; strategic plan development and implementation; and measurement and reporting.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Confidentiality, Consumer protection, Federal initiatives, Health care delivery, Health information, Measures, Public health infrastructure, Standards, Strategic planning, Systems development, Technology

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. 2015. Connecting health and care for the nation: A shared nationwide interoperability roadmap–Final version 1.0. [Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services], 166 pp.

Annotation: This document proposes critical actions that the public and private sector need to take to advance toward an interoperable health information technology (IT) ecosystem. Topics include the current context, the federal health IT strategic plan; guiding principles; business and technical requirements for a learning health system; process for updating the roadmap; rules of engagement and governance; supportive business, clinical, cultural, and regulatory environments; privacy and security protections for health information; certification and testing to support adoption and optimization of health IT products; core technical standards and functions; and tracking progress and measuring success.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Confidentiality, Evaluation, Federal initiatives, Information systems, Measures, Organizational change, Role, Standards, Strategic planning, Systems development, Technology

Children's Bureau. 2015. Supporting youth in foster care in making healthy choices: A guide for caregivers and caseworkers on trauma, treatment, and psychotropic medications. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 40 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for caseworkers, foster parents, and other caregivers on supporting children and adolescents who have experienced trauma and are working to improve their mental health. Topics include understanding trauma and behavioral/mental health of youth, understanding different treatment options, seeking help for youth, and monitoring treatment and supporting progress. Tips for using the guide with youth are included.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Caregivers, Case management, Child mental health, Confidentiality, Decision making, Foster care, Foster children, Health literacy, Mental health services, Patient rights

Bouri N, Minton K, Jolani N, Rubin S. 2014. Riding the mobile wave: What local health departments need in order to adopt social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Baltimore, MD: UPMC Center for Health Security; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 41 pp., exec. summ. (5 pp.).

Annotation: This document reports findings from a study to determine what organizational factors local health department staff perceive as necessary to support their use of social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Contents include the study methods, findings, and recommendations for policy and practice. Topics include in-house capacity, leadership support and policies, legal and security issues, and audiences. Case studies are also included.

Contact: UPMC Center for Health Security, 621 E. Pratt Street, Suite 210, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (443) 573-3304 Fax: (443) 573-3305 Web Site: http://www.upmchealthsecurity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Confidentiality, Disaster planning, Health agencies, Legal issues, Local agencies, Policy analysis, Policy development, Research, Social media, Technology

California Mental Health Services Authority and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. 2014. Social media guidelines for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. Reston, VA: Entertainment Industries Council, TEAM Up, 6 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides tips for organizations and individuals communicating about mental health and suicide on social media to reduce stigma, increase help-seeking behavior, and help prevent suicide. Topics include social media strategy, content considerations on mental health and suicide prevention, language and images, building online engagement, privacy and safety concerns, addressing suicide-related posts by others, and additional resources.

Contact: Entertainment Industries Council, 1856 Old Reston Ave, Suite 215, Reston, VA 20190, Telephone: (703) 481-1414 Secondary Telephone: 800-783-3421 Fax: (703) 481-1418 E-mail: eiconline@eiconline.org Web Site: http://www.eiconline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Electronic communications, Media, Mental health, Social interaction, Social responsibility, Suicide prevention

Borrud L, Chiappa MM, Burt VL, Gahche J, Zipf G, Dohrmann SM, Johnson CL. 2014. National health and nutrition examination survey: National youth fitness survey plan, operations, and analysis, 2012. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 16 pp. (Vital and health statistics; Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 163)

Annotation: The report provides information about the plan, operations, and analysis of the first national-level survey to estimate the physical activity and fitness levels of children and adolescents ages 3-15 in the United States. Contents include information on the planning and sample design; ethical, privacy, and confidentiality considerations; field operations; mobile examination center operations; a report of findings and remuneration; and data release and analytic guidelines.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. 2014–1363.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Confidentiality, Data analysis, Data collection, Evaluation methods, National surveys, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Research design

Tebb KP, Sedlander E, Pica G, Diaz A, Peake K, Brindis CD. 2014. Protecting adolescent confidentiality under health care reform: The special case of explanation of benefits (EOBs). San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 38 pp. (EOB policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief examines the extent to which explanations of benefits (EOBs) have the potential to threaten confidentiality for adolescents and young adults, the benefits and limitations of various strategies, as well as other potential policy or programmatic solutions. Topics include tension between billing transparency and client confidentiality; EOB suppression (opting in versus opting out); enforcement, operations, and evaluation of policy changes; and engaging multiple stakeholders, especially the insurance industry.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Confidentiality, Employee benefits, Health care reform, Health insuring organizations, Policy development

Daniel S, Malvin J, Jasik CB, Brindis CD. 2014. Sensitive health care services in the era of electronic health records: Challenges and opportunities in protecting confidentiality for adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies key issues affecting access to sensitive services for young people in California under health reform, summarizes current federal and state confidentiality guidelines with special attention to the role of electronic health records (EHR), and highlights EHR challenges and opportunities to protect confidentiality while providing sensitive services.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, California, Confidentiality, Consumer protection, Guidelines, Health care reform, Medical records management, Policy development, Young adults

Syed K. 2014. Youth confidentiality in the Affordable Care Act: Approaches for ensuring greater privacy protections for vital health care. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on national and state efforts to secure comprehensive confidentiality protections for young adults insured as dependents. Topics include Affordable Care Act provisions related to young adults, insurance communications that may compromise young adults' confidentiality and negatively impact their health, young adults' need for confidentiality as recognized by law and state law approaches to securing confidentiality in dependent coverage. Recommendations are included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Confidentiality, Health care reform, Health insurance, Medical records, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Patient rights, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Guttmacher Institute. 2014. Protecting confidentiality for individuals insured as dependents. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief describes approaches by several states to address confidentiality concerns of dependents, often minors or young adults, related to use of medical services covered by the insurance of their parents or other persons. Topics include explanations of benefits and who can see them, sexuality transmitted diseases treatment, and broader confidentiality provisions.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Health insurance

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Syed K. 2014. Ensuring young people's access to preventive services in the Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 13 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the preventive services available to young people through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how advocates, policymakers, and program planners can help ensure that young people have access to the health care they need. Topics include preventive services available without cost-sharing, which plans must comply, when services are covered, preventive services and Medicaid, enforcement of the ACA, and barriers to access for young people, and recommendations. Descriptions of ACA regulations affecting youth are provided in the appendix.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Confidentiality, Health care reform, Health insurance, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Youth

Michigan Department of Community Health. [2013]. Oral health surveillance plan 2013 to 2018. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Community Health, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document describes a 6-year plan to estimate the prevalence of oral disease in Michigan. The purpose of the plan is to identify vulnerable population groups, monitor trends in oral health indicators, evaluate the effectiveness of programs and policy changes, and communicate information for decision-making. Topics include oral health indicators, data sources, the data-collection schedule, dissemination, privacy and confidentiality, and evaluation.

Contact: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Capitol View Building, 201 Townsend Street, Lansing, MI 48913, Telephone: (517) 373-3740 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Data collection, Data sources, Health status, Information dissemination, Michigan, Oral health, Policy development, Population surveillance, Program evaluation, Statewide planning, Trends

Thorpe J, Rosenbaum S. 2013. Understanding the interaction between EPSDT and federal health information privacy and confidentiality laws. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Department on Health Policy, 31 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the federal legal framework that surrounds the use and disclosure of health information across health care, educational, and social service settings for Medicaid-eligible children. The analysis begins with a discussion of the overarching considerations that apply to federal laws governing health information privacy, including client-professional relationships, parent-child relationships, and treatment across multiple care settings. Additional topics include an overview of relevant laws and regulations and the types of information-management and exchange issues that arise when professionals who practice in different systems are engaged in caring for children in Medicaid. Recommendations are also presented.

Contact: George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy, 950 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., Sixth Floor, Washington, DC 20052, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/departments/health-policy Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Confidentiality, EPSDT, Health services, Information systems, Legal issues, Legislation, Medicaid, Medical records, Systems development

Comey J, Tatian PA, Freiman L, Winkler MK, Hayes C, Franks K, Jordan R. 2013. Measuring performance: A guidance document for Promise Neighborhoods on collecting data and reporting results. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 261 pp.

Annotation: This guidance is designed to help Promise Neighborhoods implementation grantees collect and assemble indicators to benchmark and track progress over time. Contents include an overview of data collection and use, the structure of a data system, indicators, core elements of the case management system, ensuring confidentiality and data security, neighborhood and school climate surveys, and neighborhood- and school-level data.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Promise Neighborhoods, LBJ Building, Room 4W338, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-5970, Telephone: (202) 453-6615 Fax: (202) 401-4123 E-mail: promiseneighborhoods@ed.gov Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/promiseneighborhoods/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Case management, Community development, Confidentiality, Data, Data collection, Family support programs, Federal initiatives, Information systems, Measures, Neighborhoods, Outcome and process assessment, School surveys, Schools, Systems development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.