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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

Brignardello-Petersen R, Carrasco-Labra A, Booth A, Glick M, Guyatt GH, Azarpazhooh A, Agoritsas T. 2014. A practical approach to evidence-based dentistry: How to search for evidence to inform clinical decisions. Journal of the American Dental Association 145(12):1262–1267,

Annotation: This article, the second in a series on evidence-based dentistry (EBD), describes how to frame questions that support the search for evidence to inform clinical decision-making. The article also identifies EBD resources and how to search for relevant evidence by translating questions into effective search terms.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparison groups, Decision making, Literature reviews, Oral health, Research methodology

Craigie T, Brooks-Gunn J, Waldfogel J. 2010. Family structure, family stability and early child wellbeing. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study --a nationally representative cohort of children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 -- to distinguish the effects of family structure at birth from family stability over time on child health, cognitive, and socio-emotional outcomes. The authors' findings indicate that family structure and stability are important to all child outcomes but that the health outcomes of children born to married or cohabiting parents are more adversely affected by changes in family structure over time. The study looks at two models: one that measures family structure at birth only and a second that measures possible changes in family structure since birth. Descriptive statistics for outcome measures and mediators are provided in tables, which include variables such as asthma, obesity, aggressive behavior, anxiety/depressive behavior, income, father involvement, and parental depression.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Biological parents, Child health, Cognitive development, Comparison groups, Data, Families, Longitudinal studies, Measures, Models, Outcome evaluation, Single parents, Statistics, Young children

Carlson MJ, Berger LM. 2010. What kids get from parents: Packages of parental involvement across complex family forms. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper compares parental involvement among young children living in different contemporary family structures, including those living with a single mother; those living with a resident social father, those living with two married biological parents; and those living in families where there are children from previous relationships. The paper then assesses the relative levels of parental investments (including parent-child engagement and economic resources) available to children at age 5, as well as changes in investments between children ages 1 through 5 by family structure categories. Included are measurements in the frequency of parent-child activity and access to income as reported by mothers. Tables and graphs compare findings according to specific family characteristics.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Biological parents, Child health, Comparison groups, Economic factors, Families, Parent child relations, Parenting, Single parents, Social factors, Socioeconomic factors, Young children

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense. 1963. Manual for nutrition surveys. (2nd ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense, 327 pp.

Annotation: This manual is designed to establish uniformity in methods, techniques, procedures, and guidelines for conducting nutrition surveys to make meaningful comparisons of results within and between countries; to outline and define responsibilities and duties of survey team members; to provide a guide to interpretation of dietary, biochemical, and clinical data collected; to serve as a working reference of major facts essential to proper appraisal of nutritional status, and to aid in interpreting findings to draft practical, effective recommendations to alleviate nutritional problems discovered; and to assist in training personnel in nutritional appraisal techniques and stimulate continued nutrition work.

Keywords: Comparison groups, Manuals, Nutrition surveys

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.