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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (73 total).

Golden J. 2018. Babies made us modern: How infants brought America into the twentieth century. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press,

Annotation: This book examines how babies shaped American society and culture and led their families into the modern world to become more accepting of scientific medicine, active consumers, open to new theories of human psychological development, and welcoming of government advice and programs. The book also examines the influence of cultural traditions and religious practices upon the diversity of infant lives, exploring the ways class, race, region, gender, and community shaped life in the nursery and household.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/

Keywords: Community role, Cultural beliefs, Infants, Regional factors, Religion, Social change, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Snyder JE. 2016. Community health workers: Roles and responsibilities in health care delivery system reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews health services research findings on community health workers (CHWs) and considers key challenges for CHWs to improve health care delivery, including oral health care delivery. Topics include major roles for CHWs in the health care system, a national profile of CHWs, evidence on the clinical impact of CHWs, the policy impact potential for CHW interventions, opportunities for reimbursement through Medicaid, and state and health care innovation models.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Allied health personnel, Barriers, Community health aides, Community role, Culturally competent services, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Home health aides, Low income groups, Medicaid, Minority groups, Oral health, Patient care teams, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Reimbursement, Service delivery systems, Standards, Sustainability, Training, Work force

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. AMCHP case study: Engaging diverse populations–State examples. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document describes family engagement as a critical part of Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs and ways that states are engaging diverse populations. Contents include case study examples in Kentucky and Texas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community participation, Cultural diversity, Families, Kentucky, Leadership, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Texas, Title V programs

University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development. 2015–. Community Tool Box. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides resources and tools to assist individuals and groups in working together to build healthier communities. Contents include how-to information for learning a skill, taking action, linking with others, and supporting collective impact. The website is available in English and Spanish. Topics include community assessment; communications to promote interest and participation; developing a strategic plan and organizational structure; leadership and management; analyzing community problems and designing community interventions; implementing promising community interventions; cultural competence and spirituality in community building; organizing effective advocacy; evaluating community programs and initiatives; maintaining quality and rewarding accomplishments; generating, managing, and sustaining financial resources; and social marketing and sustainability of the initiative.

Contact: University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Dole Center, Room 4082, Lawrence, KS 66045-7555, Telephone: (785) 864-0533 E-mail: workgroup@ku.edu Web Site: http://communityhealth.ku.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Community participation, Community role, Databases, Model programs, Non-English-Language materials, Planning, Policy development, Problem solving, Program development, Social change, Spanish language materials, Systems development

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2015. State community health worker models. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 1 v.

Annotation: This interactive map highlights state activity to integrate community health workers (CHWs) into evolving health care systems in key areas such as financing, education and training, certification, and state definitions, roles, and scopes of practice. The map includes enacted state CHW legislation and provides links to state CHW associations and other leading organizations working on CHW issues in states.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Associations, Certification, Community based services, Community health workers, Education, Financing, Health care systems, Organizations, Role, Service integration, State legislation, Training

Network for Public Health Law. 2015. Water fluoridation: Issue brief. St. Paul, MN: Network for Public Health Law, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the water-fluoridation process, the public health impact of water fluoridation, and the legal framework governing water fluoridation. Topics include the complementary roles that federal, state, and local governments play in implementing water fluoridation.

Contact: Network for Public Health Law, 875 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105, Telephone: (651) 695-7749 Fax: (651) 695-7749 Web Site: https://www.networkforphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health services, Fluorides, Government role, Oral health, Preventive health services, Regulations, Water

Every Woman Every Child. 2015. The global strategy for women's, children's and adolescents' health (2016–2030). New York, NY: Every Woman Every Child, 103 pp.

Annotation: This document for the global community provides guidance on safeguarding women, children, and adolescents and upholding their human rights to the highest attainable standard of health. Topics include health challenges, the health equity gap within and between countries, guiding principles and objectives, targets, action areas, and an operational framework.

Contact: Every Woman Every Child, United Nations Foundation, 801 Second Avenue, Suite 900, New York, NY 10017, Web Site: http://www.everywomaneverychild.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Barriers, Child health, Community action, Government action, Infant health, International health, Role, Safety, Strategic planning, Women's health

Pew Charitable Trusts. 2015. Fluoride in our water: Facts you need to make a healthy choice. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts, 1 video (2 min.).

Annotation: This video provides information about how community water fluoridation (CWF) has benefitted children and adults by preventing tooth decay. Topics include information about the number of people on public water systems in the United States who live in places where their communities have decided to adjust fluoride in the water to the optimal level to prevent dental caries, and federal, professional, and international support for CWF.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Children, Community role, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Oral health, Preventive health services, Water

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health. 2015. Community water fluoridation. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the safety and benefits of community water fluoridation (CWF) in preventing tooth decay and its complications in children and adults. Topics include the effectiveness of CWF in reducing disparities and saving costs and the use of fluoride nationally and internationally

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Children, Community role, Cost effectiveness, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Oral health, Preventive health services, Public health, Water

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. 2015. Connecting health and care for the nation: A shared nationwide interoperability roadmap–Final version 1.0. [Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services], 166 pp.

Annotation: This document proposes critical actions that the public and private sector need to take to advance toward an interoperable health information technology (IT) ecosystem. Topics include the current context, the federal health IT strategic plan; guiding principles; business and technical requirements for a learning health system; process for updating the roadmap; rules of engagement and governance; supportive business, clinical, cultural, and regulatory environments; privacy and security protections for health information; certification and testing to support adoption and optimization of health IT products; core technical standards and functions; and tracking progress and measuring success.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Confidentiality, Evaluation, Federal initiatives, Information systems, Measures, Organizational change, Role, Standards, Strategic planning, Systems development, Technology

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

ASCD. 2014. Whole school whole community whole child: A collaborative approach to learning and health. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 13 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model for collaboration and action across communities, across schools, and across sectors to meet the needs and reach the potential of each child. Topics include the need for greater alignment, integration, and collaboration between education and health to improve each child's cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development; combining and building on elements of the traditional coordinated school health approach and the whole child framework; and developing joint or collaborative policies, processes, and practices.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community role, Educational reform, Government role, Health status, Learning, Models, Multidisciplinary teams, National initiatives, Policy development, School age children, School role, Service integration

Plaza C, Arons A, Rosenthal J, Heider F. 2014. Financing prevention: How states are balancing delivery system and public health roles. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity, 43 pp. (This report was prepared for ChangeLab Solutions by the National Academy for State Health Policy with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. ChangeLab Solutions holds the copyright. National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN) is a project of ChangeLab Solutions. (JMB))

Annotation: This report explores efforts in eight states to support community-based prevention activities through delivery system and payment reform design innovation. Topics include public health, delivery system reform, and the Affordable Care Act; mechanisms to align the delivery system and community-based prevention; and lessons from states' experiences. The appendices contain profiles of efforts in California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Vermont.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Financing, Government role, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health policy, Policy development, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Reimbursement, Service delivery systems, State initiatives

Child Trends. 2014. Making the grade: Assessing the evidence for integrated student supports. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 133 pp.

Annotation: This report examines, from multiple perspectives, integrated student supports (ISS) as a strategy to address disparities in educational attainment and achievement. The report defines ISS as a school-based approach to promoting students' academic achievement and educational attainment by coordinating a seamless system of wraparound supports at multiple levels that target students academic and non-academic barriers to learning. Topics include models developed by practitioners in communities, research on child development, research on education, as well as evaluation studies. The report triangulates these knowledge bases to assess where the ISS field is and the evidence base that underlies the approach. Next steps and implications for research and evaluation are included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, After school programs, Barriers, Community role, Education, Educational attainment, Integrated services, Learning, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School role, School safety

ASCD, Whole Child. 2014. Whole child snapshots: Measuring whole child success across the states. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources highlight how well each state and the nation are meeting the comprehensive needs of children. The snapshots feature data aligned with the following five tenets: healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. Together, the data provide a picture of child well-being and suggest ideas for how communities can make targeted and innovative improvements to support the potential of students and prepare them for lifelong learning, career success, and active citizenship. In addition to individualized state data, the snapshots also provide notable national data highlights.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Collaboration, Community role, Data, Health care utilization, Health status, Life course, Participation, Program coordination, Safety, School age children, Students

California Department of Public Health. 2014. California community water fluoridation fact sheet. [Sacramento, CA]: California Department of Public Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the mission, background, and benefits of the California Community Water Fluoridation program. Topics include trends in the population with access to fluoridated public drinking water and the program's role in reducing the prevalence of tooth decay and tooth loss, periodontal disease, and other chronic diseases through prevention, education, and organized community efforts.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA Telephone: (916) 558-1784 Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Community health services, Community role, Fluorides, Oral health, Prevention programs, State programs, Trends, Water

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. Community conversations about mental health. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 items.

Annotation: These resources support the national dialogue and build awareness about mental illness in communities. Contents include an information brief (in English and Spanish), a discussion guide, and a planning guide. Topics include basic facts about mental health and mental illness, as well as information on the causes of mental illness and how families, schools, and communities can best treat and respond to it. Additional topics include promoting mental health and preventing mental illness, addressing public attitudes, evidence-based practices for treatment, and recovery support services. Suggestions for community planning, terms and definitions, and resources and websites are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SM13-4763.

Keywords: Communication, Community health services, Community participation, Community role, Families, Mental health, Public awareness campaigns, Schools, Spanish language materials

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.