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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2015. State community health worker models. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 1 v.

Annotation: This interactive map highlights state activity to integrate community health workers (CHWs) into evolving health care systems in key areas such as financing, education and training, certification, and state definitions, roles, and scopes of practice. The map includes enacted state CHW legislation and provides links to state CHW associations and other leading organizations working on CHW issues in states.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Associations, Certification, Community based services, Community health workers, Education, Financing, Health care systems, Organizations, Role, Service integration, State legislation, Training

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2015. CDC Community Health Improvement Navigator. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides leaders and stakeholders with expert-vetted tools and resources to support collaborative, impactful community health improvement work. Contents include a database of interventions focused on the following four action areas: socioeconomic factors, physical environment, health behaviors, and clinical care.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Community organizations, Databases, Health systems agencies, Intervention, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Systems development

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Associate Director of Policy. 2015. CDC Community Health Improvement Navigator: Database of interventions. Altanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes a tool designed to assist community leaders and stakeholders in making decisions about how to invest in their community and address community health needs. Topics include how to find interventions for seven target risk factors related to the leading causes of illness and death in the United States. The fact sheet also describes how to find interventions by target population, by target outcome or indicator, by intervention setting/location, by intervention type, and by assets (people or organizations, physical or virtual space). Information about data sources for interventions is included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Community organizations, Databases, Health systems agencies, Intervention, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Systems development

Buckley DI, McGinnis P, Fagnan LJ, Mardon R, Johnson M, Dymek C. 2013. Clinical-community relationships evaluation roadmap. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Prevention and Chronic Care Program, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on future research into and evaluation of the design and implementation of effective relationships between primary care practices and community organizations to promote increased availability of clinical preventive services. Contents include background and priority questions and recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-58763-428-4.

Keywords: Community organizations, Evaluation, Health services delivery, Preventive health services, Primary care, Relationships, Research

Jordan C, ed. 2011. Community engaged scholarship for health. Seattle, WA: Community-Campus Partnerships for Health,

Annotation: This website provides a mechanism for peer-reviewing, publishing, and disseminating products of health-related community-engaged scholarship that are in forms other than journal articles. The website contains tools and resources that can be directly downloaded or obtained from the author, typically free-of-charge. Contents include a products database that can be searched by category including allied health, biological sciences, health information management, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health, social and behavioral sciences, and social work. Visitors can also search by keyword, author, title, resource type, product type, or methodological approach.

Contact: Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, University of Washington, Box 354809, Seattle, WA 98195-4809, Telephone: (206) 666-3406 E-mail: ccphuw@u.washington.edu Web Site: http://www.ccph.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Databases, Information sources, Peer review organizations, Professional training, Public health, Public private partnerships, Research

Marios D, Sterba E, Kretzmann J, Pan R. 2008. A new formula for child health: Doctors + communities = Healthy kids. Evanston, IL: Asset-Based Community Development Institute, 93 pp.

Annotation: This document tells the stories of six very different projects that evolved from Communities and Physicians Together (CPT), a partnership between an academic health center and grassroots community organizations in Sacramento, California, and associated non-profits and professional associations. The purpose of CPT is to teach resident physicians how to effectively partner with communities to improve community health. The story of each project is divided into six subcategories: the community context, the project, overcoming challenges, successes and outcomes, and looking back.

Contact: Asset-Based Community Development Institute, Northwestern University School of Education and Social Policy, Center for Civic Engagement, 1813 Hinman Ave., Evanston, IL 60208, Telephone: (847) 491-8711 Fax: (847) 467-4140 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abcdinstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community health services, Community organizations, Health, Physicians, Programs

Eiken S, Galantwicz S, Stubbs A. 2006. Innovative strategies for strengthening family to family health information and education centers. Cambridge, MA: Research and Policy Division, Thomson Medstat, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies in these areas: developing partnerships to increase organizational capacity and outreach, enhancing communication with families, developing culturally appropriate strategies to serve a diverse audience, facilitating the transition to adulthood, and ensuring sustainability through multiple funding sources. The appendix lists family to family health care information centers by state.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family resource centers, Family support services, Information services, Children with developmental disabilities, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community organizations, Families, Health education

CityMatCH. 2006. Reducing health inequities: The impact of neighborhood factors on health. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This Web conference site hosts slide presentations from two expert presenters who work on improving health at the community level. The first examines the economic, social, physical, and services factors of the issue. The second identifies the neighborhood factors that can contribute to health inequities, describes national and local health department initiatives addressing neighborhood factors affecting health outcomes, and identifies opportunities for program and policy development addressing these risk factors to reduce health inequities. A link to additional resources is provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community organizations, Community programs, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Environmental influences, Public health, Underserved communities

Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families. 2006. Forging partnerships in culturally diverse communities. Insight: A Review of Current GCYF Topics and Issues. 1-38. Winter 2006/2007,

Annotation: This issue explore opportunities for collaboration between philanthropy and national African-American and Latino led organizations to address critical health issues affecting African-American and Latino children and families. It reveals trends in foundation giving as well as the context of philanthropy in communities of color, and draws on lessons and expertise of the oldest African-American and Latino civic and fraternal organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org requires membership to access full document.

Keywords: Blacks, Community organizations, Grants, Hispanic Americans, Minority health, National organizations, Philanthropy, Underserved communities

Bissell M, Allen M. 2004. Kinship care resource kit for community and faith-based organizations: Helping grandparents and other relatives raising children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 83 pp.

Annotation: This resource kit about kinship care (grandparents and other relatives caring for children whose parents are unable or unwilling to raise them) provides information for community and faith-based organizations to help them understand the unique challenges kinship caregivers face and what needs to be done to help them. The resource kit includes a wide range of information and practical advice. The kit concludes with a list of resources.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community organizations, Families, Family support, Grandparents, Parents, Religious organizations, Resource materials

New York City Satellite/Medical Research Association of New York City. 2004. A case study of faith-based outreach in New York City: Lessons learned from a SIDS risk reduction initiative—Final report. [New York, NY]: New York City Satellite / Medical Research Association of New York City, 15 pp.

Annotation: This monograph is a case study that describes the research-driven process followed to design and implement a grandparent or elder faith-based SIDS-reduction outreach strategy to address African-American infant mortality disparity in New York City, using Back to Sleep campaign materials. The monograph is intended to help others who wish to implement SIDS-reduction programs in their own local settings. The monograph provides background and discusses addressing the need, developing a plan, identifying and training consultants and outreach educators, describing the educational format, evaluating the process and effectiveness of promoting the message, disseminating the message, and lessons learned. A summary is provided. The monograph concludes with a list of references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Blacks, Case studies, Community programs, Consultants, Cultural factors, Education, Evaluation, Grandparents, Infant mortality, New York, Older adults, Outreach, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Religious organizations, Research, SIDS, Training

Mulkern V, Raab B, Kadis J. 2004. Connecticut Community Kidcare Evaluation: Phase Two—An evaluation of the Care Coordination Program. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report summarized the findings of an evaluation designed to assess how children with complex behavioral health needs and their families move through Connecticut's Care Coordination Program, a program designed to serve children with complex behavioral health needs who have a documented psychiatric diagnosis, are involved with multiple service systems, and have a need for assistance in identifying and mobilizing personal community resources to secure and coordinate services and supports. The report also discusses the degree to which the care adheres to the System of Care principles that serve as the foundation for Connecticut KidCare. The report, which contains an executive summary, discusses the methods, the care coordination process, and fidelity to the system of care. A summary and recommendations are provided. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report, as well as in three appendices.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child health, Community organizations, Connecticut, Families, Health services, Program coordination, Psychiatric diagnosis, State programs

Movement Strategy Center, Young Wisdom Project. 2004. Making space, making change: Profiles of youth-led and youth-driven organizations. [Oakland, CA]: Young Wisdom Project, Movement Strategy Center, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report provides background on youth-led organizations and highlights five youth-led social justice efforts, describing the lessons they have learned and the tools they have developed. The organizations are: (1) Youth Organizations United (HIV education and reproductive health policy), (2) Lummi CEDAR Project (respecting traditional values, building intergenerational bridges, and supporting youth-led community organizing, (3) Kids As Self Advocates (educating about youth with disabilities), (4) About Face Youth Theater (empowering lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth and their allies), and (5) National Conference for Community and Justice (fighting bias, bigotry, and racism).

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Community organizations, Community programs, Education, HIV infection, Leadership, Moral values, Participation, Public policy, Racism, Reproductive health, Social change, Social values, Young adults

Presman D, Chapman R, Rosen L. 2002. Creative partnerships: Supporting youth, building communities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 14 pp. (Cops innovations: A closer look)

Annotation: This report describes three innovative examples of ways the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has worked with local agencies to develop partnership-based programs for youth. Programs described include (1) Home Run Program, with probation officers working with students in schools to identify and address behavioral problems to prevent entrance into the juvenile justice system in the future; (2) Stop the Violence, empowering youth to find ways to address school violence; and (23 police magnet schools, encouraging students to view law enforcement as a rewarding career path.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530, Telephone: (800) 421-6770 E-mail: askCopsRC@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.cops.usdoj.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Agencies, Community organizations, Community programs, Government, Interagency cooperation, Law enforcement, Schools

Hodges S, Hernandez M, Nesman T, Lipien L. 2002. Creating change and keeping it real: How excellent child-serving organizations carry out their goals—Cross-site findings for phase I of Community Based Theories of Change. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the cross-site findings of the Community-Based Theories of Change study, which investigates how human services organizations carry out their mission and goals, how they transfer their policy agendas across stakeholders, and how they sustain their service strategies over time. The report also presents lessons learned across the three participating sites, provides a discussion, and offers conclusions. Two appendices include an overview of the study's research questions and descriptive materials. The report includes a list of works cited.

Contact: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3809, Telephone: (813) 974-4661 Fax: (813) 974-6257 E-mail: kutash@fmhi.usf.edu Web Site: http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Community agencies, Community based services, Human services, Organizational change, Organizations, Research

Annie E. Casey Foundation. [2001]. Residents engaged in strengthening families and neighborhoods. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 50 pp. (Making Connections resource guides)

Annotation: This report describes the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Making Connections initiative, dedicated to helping families in low-income neighborhoods connect to a range of supports and opportunities and to develop stronger voices about what happens in their neighborhoods. The first section describes two types of resident engagement activities and lays out a framework for thinking about families along a continuum from "isolated" to "connected." Section two provides answers to some of the questions and requests that residents might have. The third section provides descriptions of innovative models for developing and enhancing resident engagement and family leadership.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Community organizations, Community programs, Family support services, Low income groups, Model programs

Bronheim S, comp. 2001. Sharing a legacy of caring: Partnerships between health care and faith-based organizations. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 30 pp.

Annotation: This monograph is a guide to developing successful, substantive and mutually beneficial partnerships between safety net providers and faith-based organizations that will address health disparities in minority populations and lead to improved health outcomes for individuals and communities. Aimed at health care policy makers, administrators, governing and advisory boards, providers, and leaders in faith-based organizations, the monograph was developed for the Bureau of Primary Health Care and its Faith Partnership Initiative. Topics include reasons to reach out to the faith community, strengthening the safety net, perceived barriers to partnerships, and meeting of organizational cultures. A list of contact information for examples of partnerships cited in the monograph and a bibliography are included.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community programs, Ethnic factors, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health status, Minority groups, Racial factors, Religious organizations

Restuccia R, Herold N. [2000]. Improving health care for children and families: A guide to key ideas, effective approaches, and technical assistance resources for Making Connections cities and site teams. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 42 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides a description of key ideas that have shaped promising approaches to a more family-supportive system of health and health care. The guide includes an introduction, which describes the Annie E. Casey Foundation's perspective on health; a section titled "Potential Request, Opportunities, and Challenges," which lists a number of questions that community members may raise; and a section titled "Promising Approaches and Resources," which describes strategies for expanding access to care and reforming the health care system.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Health care delivery, Community organizations, Community programs, Family support, Family support services, Health care systems, Low income groups, Model programs

Rogers S. 2000. Sign 'em up: Strategies to enroll eligible children in DC Healthy Families. Washington, DC: Georgetown Public Policy Institute; Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 22 pp. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This report provides information about the barriers to identifying and enrolling children in DC Healthy Families, the District of Columbia State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). It also describes successful methods of expanding enrollment, including the use of community-based organizations (CBO's), school activities, and health care providers initiatives. Also included are a list of district and national resources, and information describing the DC Family Policy Seminars. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Community health services, Community organizations, DC Healthy Families, State Children's Health Insurance Program

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.