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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (331 total).

Nicol P. n.d.. Coordinated Community-Based Services: [Final report]. Frankfort, KY: Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department for Health Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Human Resources, 39 pp.

Annotation: The principle aim of this project was to demonstrate a coordinated, community-based program model for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of children from birth to five years of age with developmental disabilities, children at risk for them, and for their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152932.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Developmental disorders, Early intervention, Family centered care, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Malach R. n.d.. Case Management for Parents of Indian Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project provided a model program for American Indian families and the professionals who served them. The program goals were to identify cultural, systemic, institutional, and policy barriers that inhibit Native American family participation in the "Western" health care/case management system; improve case management by facilitating effective communication between Native American families and the non-Native American health care professionals who serve them; and increase Native American family participation in health care policy development and planning forums in order to promote changes that improve services for Native American children and families. Activities included developing a videotape illustrating effective cross-cultural communication strategies for non-Indian health care providers and training an Indian parent advocate to help families seen at IHS special pediatric clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158251.

Keywords: American Indians, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Family-Based Health Care, Indian Health Service (IHS), Low income groups, Parents, Rural Population

Kessel R. n.d.. Diagnostic and Followup Project for Native American Children in Wisconsin with Special Health Care Needs = WINGS Project [Final report]. Madison, WI: Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was part of an ongoing effort to identify and address issues related to developmental disabilities among Native American children in Wisconsin to assure that proper diagnostic and followup services are provided to this population. Tribes, State and local agencies, and volunteer organizations were involved in a collaborative effort to design and establish a long-term, community-based, high quality program in each tribal community in Wisconsin to serve the special health care needs of Native American children. The two main goals of the project were to: (1) Become an integral part of the tribal service systems, and (2) improve those systems in such a way that they address both the needs of developmentally disabled children and the issues related to the prevention of disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161941.

Keywords: American Indians, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Academy of General Dentistry. n.d.. A state advocacy toolkit. Chicago, IL: Academy of General Dentistry, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document for oral health professionals provides information and resources about advocating for oral health and oral health care access in states. Topics include becoming aware, being educated, and informed; building grassroots support; building coalitions; reaching out to legislators; testifying before state boards or legislatures; and attending or hosting town hall meetings and fundraisers. A link to additional resources for facilitating advocacy in government, public, and professional relations is also provided.

Contact: Academy of General Dentistry, 560 W. Lake Street, Sixth Floor, Chicago, IL 60661-6600, Telephone: (888) 243-3368 Fax: (312) 335-3443 Web Site: http://www.agd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Coalitions, Community action, Fundraising, Legislation, Oral health, Policy development, Public awareness campaigns, Statewide planning

Wisconsin Oral Health Coalition. 2019. Check-up on oral health: A call to action. Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Oral Health Coalition, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about the importance of oral health throughout the lifespan, the economic costs of oral disease and oral health disparities, and efforts to improve access to preventive oral health services in Michigan. Topics include gains made in increasing access statewide through the expansion of Healthy Kids Dental, a public-private partnership between the Michigan Department of Community Health and Delta Dental; maintenance of dental benefits for adults enrolled in Medicaid; community water fluoridation; and dental sealants.

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: http://www.chawisconsin.org/oral-health.php?pg=13 Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Barriers, Children, Coalitions, Community action, Dental sealants, Fluorides, Health care disparities, Infants, Life course, Medicaid, Michigan, Older adults, Oral health, Policy development, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, State programs, Statewide planning, Water, Wisconsin

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Weinstein JN, Geller A, Baciu A, Negussio Y, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Community-Based Solutions to Promote Health Equity in the United States. 2017. Communities in action: Pathways to health equity. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 530 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the evidence on the status of health disparities and the research examining the underlying conditions that lead to poor health and health inequities. It also examines and shares examples of solutions implemented in several communities. Topics include the need to promote health equity, the state of health disparities in the United States, the root cause of health inequity, the role of communities in promoting health equity, examples of communities tackling health inequity, policies to support community solutions, partners in promoting health equity in communities, and community tools to promote health equity.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Equal opportunities, Health disparities, Health promotion, Health status, Policy development, Public private partnerships

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Phurisamban R, Gleick P. 2017. Drinking fountains and public health: Improving national water infrastructure to rebuild trust and ensure access. Oakland, CA: Pacific Institute, 13 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes epidemiology reports and other evidence of drinking fountain-related health issues to reveal the extent of the problem and explores changes needed to improve the quality and use of this hydration option. Topics include a brief history of water fountains, evidence of contamination at water fountains such as microbial and heavy metal contamination, the Safe Drinking Water Act and national drinking water standards, and guidelines for cleaning and maintaining drinking water fountains. The paper concludes with a discussion of efforts needed to expand the science and practice of ensuring that drinking fountains remain clean, safe, and accessible.

Contact: Pacific Institute, 654 13th Street, Preservation Park, Oakland, CA Telephone: (510) 251-1600 Fax: (510) 251-2203 Web Site: http://www.pacinst.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-893790-77-3.

Keywords: Community base services, Environmental exposure, Federal legislation, Guidelines, Policy development, Public health infrastructure, Regulations, Safety, Standards, Water, Water pollution

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Collective Impact Forum. 2017. How to lead collaborative impact working groups. Boston, MA: Collective Impact Forum, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help working group leaders contribute to a successful collective impact initiative. Contents include modules on how to build membership, plan for and run an effective meeting, build a culture of collaboration, put systems thinking into practice, engage community members, and be data-driven and learn along the way. Additional contents include sample working group strategies, meeting planning steps for co-chairs, meeting agenda templates, and a meeting follow-up email template.

Contact: Collective Impact Forum, 500 Boylston Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (866) 351-8484 E-mail: info@collectiveimpactforum.org Web Site: http://www.collectiveimpactforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Facilitated communication, Leadership, Learning, Meetings, Planning, Systems development

Boyes S, Davis L, Adams G, Mills M, Deutchman M. 2017. MORE Care: Narrowing the rural interprofessional oral health care gap. Westborough, MA: DentaQuest Institute, 35 pp., exec. summ. (10 pp.)

Annotation: This paper provides information about initiating interprofessional networks that integrate and coordinate person-centered oral health care in rural communities. Topics include oral health as a national issue with rural implications, interprofessional practice and the oral-systemic health connection, creating networks and a learning collaborative, state offices of rural health and medical-oral expanded care initiation, and challenges and opportunities for innovation. Examples from Colorado, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina are included.

Contact: DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: http://www.dentaquestpartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Health care delivery, Information systems, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Program coordination, Provider networks, Rural environment, Rural health, Rural populations, Service integration, South Carolina, State initiatives, Systems development, Technology, Work force

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

Bartlett JD, Smith S, Bringewatt E. 2017. Helping young children who have experienced trauma: Policies and strategies for early care and education. Washington, DC: Child Trends; New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report describes early childhood trauma and its effects, offers promising strategies for early care and education (ECE) programs and systems to help young children who have experienced trauma, and presents recommendations for state policymakers and other stakeholders looking to support trauma-informed ECE for this group.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chlld care, Community based services, Early childhood education, Family support services, Policy development, Service integration, Systems development, Trauma care, Vulnerability, Work force, Young children

Oakes J, Maier A, Daniel J. 2017. Community schools: An evidence-based strategy for equitable school improvement. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center and Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the research on community schools, with two primary emphases. First, it explores whether the 2015 federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) opens the possibility of investing in well-designed community schools to meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in high-poverty schools. And second, it provides support to school, district, and state leaders as they consider, propose, or implement a community school intervention in schools targeted for comprehensive support. An online research compendium summarizing the referenced studies referenced is also available.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Web Site: https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Collaboration, Community based services, Community development, Costs, Federal legislation, Intervention, Leadership, Policy analysis, Poverty, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Service integration, Students, Vulnerability

O'Neil M, Sweetland J, Fond M. 2017. Unlocking the door to new thinking: Frames for advancing oral health reform. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 28 pp. (FrameWorks message memo)

Annotation: This document outlines findings from research on how Americans think about oral health and explains these findings’ implications for communication, outreach, and advocacy. Topics include how the public thinks about oral health and related issues, implications of attitudes toward oral health for advancing an informed public conversation, and communications tools and techniques.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Barriers, Communication, Community action, Disease prevention, Health care reform, Health disparities, Health promotion, Mass media, Oral health, Outreach, Public policy, Service integration, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Teamwork

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Gutierrez H, Hampton K, Hecht A, Patel A. [2016]. Parents making waves: A toolkit for promoting drinking water in schools. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco and California Food Policy Advocates, and Enigami Ventures, 40 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help parents improve access to drinking water at school. Contents include a tip sheet, a sample school-wellness policy and letter to a school administrator, tools for conducting a drinking water inventory and observing students drinking water, and an action plan checklist. Topics include how to fund a school water program, ensuring that school water is safe, understanding tap water sources, and promoting water intake in schools.

Contact: California Food Policy Advocates, 436 14th Street, Suite 1220, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 433-1122 Fax: (510) 433-1131 Web Site: http://cfpa.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community action, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Parents, Policy development, Program development, Program planning, School health programs, Spanish language materials, Water

U.S. Office of Head Start. 2016–. Head Start policy and regulations. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for Head Start agencies that provide services to children and families describe program performance standards and the requirements set forth in the Head Start Act of 2007. Topics include program governance, financial and administrative requirements, administrative procedures, and definitions. Information about program operations including oral health services are provided. Additional resources for grantees include information memoranda, program instructions, and information about fiscal regulations.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Community based services, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Early childhood education, Early intervention programs, Educational programs, Federal legislation, Fiscal management, Head Start, Health programs, Oral health, Prevention programs, Program budgeting, Program coordination, Program development, Program management, Psychosocial development, Regulations, Standards, Young Children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.