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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (148 total).

Simmons E. n.d.. Youth in Transition—The Alabama Experience: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Education, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project focused on developing a systematic approach to integrate medical, vocational, educational, psychosocial, and developmental services for adolescents with physical disabilities and/or chronic illness who are at risk in their transition to maturity. Project objectives were to (1) create an administrative structure at the State level and in two pilot sites for provision of an integrated continuum of health and education services; (2) enable service providers, through training and collaboration, to coordinate service planning for the target population; (3) enable the adolescent and family, through counseling and training, to function as their own "case manager"; and (4) monitor and evaluate the model to determine the feasibility for replication in Alabama and/or other states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147031.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Bases, Interdisciplinary Teams, Rural Population, Urban Population

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

Henry W. n.d.. PATHFINDER: A Project to Improve Systems of Care for Children with Chronic Health Conditions [Final report]. St. Paul, MN: Pathfinder Resources, Inc., 28 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to improve information sharing among public agencies, third-party payers, special projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS), and employers in Minnesota. Activities included an annual invitational workshop; technical assistance; a quarterly newsletter; a continuing education center; and the guidelines, *How to Develop a Community Network.* [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-163549.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community-Based Health Care, Continuing Education, Coordination of Health Care, Families, Financing Health Care, Medicaid, Networking

Valentine S. n.d.. Developing Community-Based Family Centered Care/Case Management and Family Support Services for Mississippi's Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Jackson, MS: Mississippi State Department of Health, 25 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to develop a statewide system of community-based, comprehensive care/case management and family support services. Program strategies included developing a training curriculum for the skilled delivery of home-based family support services by medical professionals, paraprofessionals, and parents; piloting a respite providers' network; providing statewide training on the provision of family support services; and developing and disseminating a statewide directory of trained family support service providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158277.

Keywords: 99-457, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Family-Based Health Care, Financing Health Care, Fragmentation of Services, L, P, Parents, Rural Population

Malach R. n.d.. Case Management for Parents of Indian Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project provided a model program for American Indian families and the professionals who served them. The program goals were to identify cultural, systemic, institutional, and policy barriers that inhibit Native American family participation in the "Western" health care/case management system; improve case management by facilitating effective communication between Native American families and the non-Native American health care professionals who serve them; and increase Native American family participation in health care policy development and planning forums in order to promote changes that improve services for Native American children and families. Activities included developing a videotape illustrating effective cross-cultural communication strategies for non-Indian health care providers and training an Indian parent advocate to help families seen at IHS special pediatric clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158251.

Keywords: American Indians, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Family-Based Health Care, Indian Health Service (IHS), Low income groups, Parents, Rural Population

Williams S. n.d.. Improving Community-Based Services for Special Needs Children and Their Families in Rural Utah [Final report]. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, 19 pp. pp.

Annotation: The goal of the project was to improve the functioning of special needs children and their families by providing locally based clinic and care coordination services in a rural area in Utah. The program objectives were to: (1) Involve parents of special needs children in developing a service plan for their child, (2) improve the implementation of service plans for rural special needs children, (3) improve coordination of services to rural special needs children, and (4) improve adequacy of services to these children. While maintaining current multidisciplinary clinic services, Children's Special Health Services worked through the local health department to place a nurse coordinator, secretary, social worker, and trained parent advocates in the local community. This team built upon existing local systems to improve the functional outcomes of the children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121834.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Advocacy, Children with Special Health care Needs, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Community Based Health Services, Parents, Rural Population, Service Coordination

Kessel R. n.d.. Diagnostic and Followup Project for Native American Children in Wisconsin with Special Health Care Needs = WINGS Project [Final report]. Madison, WI: Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was part of an ongoing effort to identify and address issues related to developmental disabilities among Native American children in Wisconsin to assure that proper diagnostic and followup services are provided to this population. Tribes, State and local agencies, and volunteer organizations were involved in a collaborative effort to design and establish a long-term, community-based, high quality program in each tribal community in Wisconsin to serve the special health care needs of Native American children. The two main goals of the project were to: (1) Become an integral part of the tribal service systems, and (2) improve those systems in such a way that they address both the needs of developmentally disabled children and the issues related to the prevention of disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161941.

Keywords: American Indians, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Perinatal Periods of Risk Work Group. n.d.. Perinatal Periods of Risk approach: The U.S. urban experience—A new community approach to fetal and infant mortality. [Omaha, NE: CityMatCH], 33 pp.

Annotation: These annotated slides outline a presentation on prevention efforts to improve fetal and infant mortality using an approach, called Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR), developed by the World Health Organization for developing countries and applying concepts to urban efforts in the United States. It highlights five major steps: (1) engaging community partners, (2) mapping feto-infant mortality, (3) focusing on reducing the overall feto-infant mortality rate, (4) examining potential opportunity gaps, and (5) targeting further investigations and prevention efforts. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community coordination, Developing countries, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, International health, Needs assessment, Prevention, Risk assessment, Statistical analysis

Chazin S, Glover J. 2017. A community framework for addressing social determinants of oral health for low-income populations. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 11 pp. (Technical assistance brief)

Annotation: This brief describes a framework for assessing social determinants related to oral health and creating partnerships to improve oral health among children from families with low incomes. Topics include identifying the social determinants of oral health in a community, mapping and mobilizing community resources through partnership, selecting approaches to take action, and evaluating implementation and impact. Contents include example indicators potentially related to oral health, intervention metrics, and how the framework was applied to select an intervention.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Low income groups, Models, Needs assessment, Oral health, Outcome evaluation, Process evaluation, Program planning, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resource allocation

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Boynes S, Davis L, Adams G, Mills M, Deutchman M. 2017. MORE Care: Narrowing the rural interprofessional oral health care gap. Westborough, MA: DentaQuest Institute, 35 pp., exec. summ. (10 pp.)

Annotation: This paper provides information about initiating interprofessional networks that integrate and coordinate person-centered oral health care in rural communities. Topics include oral health as a national issue with rural implications, interprofessional practice and the oral-systemic health connection, creating networks and a learning collaborative, state offices of rural health and medicaloral expanded care initiation, and challenges and opportunities for innovation. Examples from Colorado, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina are included.

Contact: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: https://www.carequest.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Health care delivery, Information systems, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Program coordination, Provider networks, Rural environment, Rural health, Rural populations, Service integration, South Carolina, State initiatives, Systems development, Technology, Work force

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Glicken A, Smiles for Life Steering Committee. 2017. Front line health worker curriculum. Leawood, KS: Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, 6 items.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed for front line health workers (FLHWs) (e.g., community health workers, health educators, case managers, care coordinators, public health workers, peer health promoters) who provide oral health outreach, advocacy, patient education, care coordination, health care navigation, and social support for the communities they serve. The curriculum consists of four modules; the first is an introduction, and the remaining three focus on the oral health of children, women (including pregnant women), and adults. An educator handbook and resources for FLHWs are also included.

Contact: Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 540, Leawood, KS 66211, Telephone: (913) 906-6000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 274-7928 Fax: (913) 906-6096 E-mail: stfmoffice@stfm.org Web Site: http://www.stfm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community health services, Community outreach, Health educators, Oral health, Pregnant women Curricula, Service coordination

Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin. 2016. 2015 Wisconsin perinatal-infant oral health summit: Summary report and statewide plan. Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information from a summit held on September 9, 2015, to discuss strategies for improving oral health for pregnant women and infants in Wisconsin. The report describes five themes supported by both oral health communities and overall health communities: reimbursements and insurance availability, coordination and integration, training, awareness, and practice settings. Contents include a statewide plan to reduce the prevalence of oral disease among pregnant women and infants who are underserved by integrating high-quality oral health care into the health-care-delivery system. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: https://www.chawisconsin.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Conference proceedings, Dental care, Dental insurance, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Infants, Oral health, Pregnant women, Primary care, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Service coordination, Service integration, Statewide planning, Training, Wisconsin, Work force

National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2016. A report on the status of fetal and infant mortality review in the United States 2015 = U.S. fetal and infant mortality review: 2015 status report. Washington, DC: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of state and local Fetal and Infant Mortality (FIMR) coordinators about their FIMR team structure, process, and activities. Contents include information about operations at the local level to examine medical, nonmedical, and systems-related factors and circumstances contributing to fetal and infant deaths. Information about FIMR and child death review collaboration is also included. Survey results are provided in a set of tables following the narrative. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, County programs, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Injury prevention, Local initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program coordination, Systems development, Teamwork

Teutsch SM, McCoy MA, Woodbury RB, Welp A, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Public Health Approaches to Reduce Vision Impairment and Promote Eye Health. 2016. Making eye health a population health imperative: Vision for tomorrow. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 550 pp.

Annotation: This report proposes a population-centered framework to guide action and coordination among stakeholders to improve eye and vision health and health equity in the United States. The report also introduces a model for action that highlights different levels of prevention activities across a range of stakeholders and provides specific examples of how population health strategies can be translated into cohesive areas for action at federal, state, and local levels. Topics include the epidemiology of vision loss and impairment; the impact of vision loss; surveillance and research; the role of public health and partnerships to promote eye and vision health in communities; access to clinical vision services (work force and coverage); a high quality clinical eye and vision service delivery system; and improving diagnosis, rehabilitation, and accessibility.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community action, Eye care, Health care reform, Health disparities, Health insurance, Models, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Prevention services, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Research, Service delivery systems, Vision, Vision disorders, Work force

Segal LM, De Biasi A, Lieberman DA, Olson G, Ilakkuvan V. 2016. Blueprint for a healthier America 2016: Policy priorities for the next administration and Congress. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 185 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a vision for a healthier America, the problem and need for action, guiding principles, and strategies for improving public health and health systems. Topics include prioritizing wide-scale implementation of the most effective approaches for improving health in communities around the country, achieving a health care system prepared for emergencies, and prioritizing major health topics.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community based services, Coordination, Financing, Health care systems, Health care utilization, Health policy, Organizational change, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Public private partnerships

[U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau]. 2016. Resource guide for states and communities caring for infants and children affected by Zika (upd.). [Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau], 18 pp. (Latest update 10/21/2016; document doesn't cite author/publisher; received via AMCHP's Emerging Issues Committee. (JMB))

Annotation: This resource is designed to assist states and communities in developing a coordinated response to the immediate and long term needs of infants and children affected by Zika virus (ZIKV), and their families. Contents include an overview of ZIKV, infection, and outcomes; systems of care as a public health approach for comprehensive care for infants and children exposed to ZIKV; and an overview of federal and state programs serving children affected by ZIKV. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child health, Community coordination, Comprehensive health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal programs, Health care systems, Infant health, Infection control, Neonatal screening, Policy development, Population surveillance, Program coordination, Program planning, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Service coordination, Service integration, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Virus diseases, Work force

University of California, Los Angeles, First 5 LA, and Children Now. 2016. Strengthening dental care for children utilizing California's federally qualified health centers. Oakland, CA: Children Now, 14 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief provides information about the state of children's oral health in California, an overview of federally qualified health centers' (FQHCs') role in providing primary care and oral health care services to children, and recommendations for expanding the capacity of FQHCs to improve access to quality oral health care for children in California. The brief outlines recommendations for expanding programs to increase co-location of dental and medical clinics at FQHC sites; supporting programs to improve FQHCs' oral health capacity through medical-dental integration; and expanding investments in information technology and personnel to enhance care coordination.

Contact: Children Now, 1212 Broadway, Fifth Floor, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 763-2444 Fax: (510) 763-1974 E-mail: info@childrennow.org Web Site: http://www.childrennow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Children, Community based services, Community health centers, Dental care, Health care delivery, Medicaid, Oral health, Pediatric care, Policy development, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Service integration, State programs, Statewide planning

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.