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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

National Cancer Institute. 2016. Evidence-based cancer control programs (EBCCP). Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This online, searchable database is designed to provide program planners and public health practitioners with easy and immediate access to evidence-based cancer control interventions and program materials. Program areas include breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancer screening; diet and nutrition; HPV vaccination; informed decision making; obesity; physical activity; public health genomics; sun safety; survivorship/supportive care; and tobacco control.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 12-7617.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Colon cancer, Decision making, Disease prevention, Evidence based medicine, Family support programs, Genomics, Human papillomavirus, Informed consent, Nutrition, Obesity, Online databases, Peer support programs, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Screening, Smoking, Sun exposure, Survivors, Tobacco use, Vaccines

Partnership for Prevention. 2007. Preventive care: A national profile on use, disparities, and health benefits. Washington, DC: Partnership for Prevention, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report is a follow-up a study conducted in 2006 that ranked 25 evidence-based clinical preventive services recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The report (1) documents the use of preventive care across the United States, (2) estimates the health benefits for the U.S. population of increasing the use of preventive services from current utilization rates to 90 percent, (3) quantifies disparities in use of preventive care by comparing use of services by racial and ethnic groups to the white, non-Hispanic population; and (4) gives special attention to cancer screenings by estimating the lives that would be saved if breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening rates increased from current rates to 90 percent among selected racial and ethnic groups. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: data sources and gaps on use of 25 clinical preventive services for general state or national populations.

Contact: Partnership for Prevention, 1015 18th Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 833-0009 Fax: (202) 833-0113 E-mail: info@prevent.org Web Site: http://www.prevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Colon cancer, Ethnic factors, Health care services, Prevention, Racial factors, Screening tests

Hankinson SE, Colditz GA, Manson JE, Speizer F, Manson JE, eds. 2001. Healthy women, healthy lives: A guide to preventing disease from the landmark Nurses' Health Study. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster, 546 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information from the Nurses' Health Study on a woman's probability of developing specific diseases and suggests how that probability may change with certain alterations in diet, weight control, physical activity, and other lifestyle changes. Part one discusses the Nurses' Health Study and what observations have been made by researchers and what they mean to the study of women's health issues. Part two provides information and suggestions on lowering the risk of diseases. Topics covered include coronary heart disease, different types of cancers, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, age-related eye disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The third part provides information on changing behaviors including physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and pain relievers. The appendices give information on types of epidemiological studies; being an informed consumer of health information; and a section on tables on weight and nutrition. The book concludes with a glossary, selected readings, and an index.

Contact: Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas , New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (212) 698-7000 Web Site: http://www.simonsays.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-684-85519-4.

Keywords: Alcohols, Alzheimers disease, Analgesic drugs, Antiinflammatory drugs, Arthritis, Asthma, Breast cancer, Cancer, Colon cancer, Coronary care, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Eye diseases, Family planning, Food, Hormone replacement therapy, Life cycle, Lung cancer, Menopause, Minerals, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Ovarian cancer, Physical activity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Reproductive health, Research programs, Skin cancers, Smoking, Strokes, Vitamins, Weight management, Women's health, Women's health promotion

Burke W, Fryer-Edwards K, Pinsky LE, eds. 2001. Genetics in primary care (GPC): Training program curriculum materials. (Rev. ed.). Austin, TX: National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center, 146 pp. (Genetics in primary care (GPC): A faculty development initiative)

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to serve as a bridge between primary care and genetics. The curriculum includes modules focusing on the following eight areas: (1) breast/ovarian cancer, (2) cardiovascular disease, (3) colorectal cancer, (4) congenital hearing loss, (5) dementia, (6) developmental delay, (7) iron overload, and (8) ethical, legal, and social issues. Each module includes teaching cases with questions and discussion to illustrate genetic themes and diagnoses. Each module also includes references to key documents and useful Web sites for additional background information. An overview of the Genetics in Primary Care (GPC) program and a list of its members from 1998-2001 are provided. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 1912 West Anderson Lane, Suite 210, Austin, TX 78757, Telephone: (512) 454-6419 Fax: (512) 454-6509 E-mail: therrell@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://genes-r-us.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Colon cancer, Curricula, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Genetics, Hearing disorders, Iron overload diseases, Legal issues, Mental disorders, Ovarian cancer, Primary care, Professional education materials

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.