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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

Every Child Succeeds. 2014. Moving beyond depression: Greater success for new mothers in home visiting. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a comprehensive, focused, and integrated approach to identifying and treating depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs. The program involves three phases instituted over two years: (1) on-site training of home visitors in identification of maternal depression and role in the program, (2) training of therapists in Cincinnati in in-home cognitive behavioral therapy, and (3) ongoing training and support of therapists. Information about maternal depression, the program's research base, a training calendar, and additional resources about postpartum depression and postpartum support are included.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Depression, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Therapeutic programs, Training

Johnson K, Ammerman RT, Van Ginkel JB. 2014. Moving beyond depression: An effective program to treat maternal depression in home visiting–Opportunities for states. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a program that uses in-home cognitive behavioral therapy to treat maternal depression as an added component for home visiting programs. Topics include the impact of maternal depression on women, children, and families; the program's research and results, return on investment, design, and implementation; and opportunities and potential roles for states and home visiting programs.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Depression, Financing, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, State programs, Therapeutic programs, Training

Duckworth K, Gruttadaro D, Markey D. 2010. What families should know about adolescent depression (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about adolescent depression and treatment options. It introduces adolescent depression and its causes and symptoms and getting an accurate diagnosis. It then discusses treatment, including talk therapy and medications; risks and benefits of antidepressants, as well as family history and treatment. Risk of suicide is also presented, creating good monitoring systems and safety plans, treatment research, and how to be an effective advocate for an adolescent with depression. The guide concludes with resources.

Contact: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203, Telephone: (703) 524-7600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 950-6264 Fax: (703) 524-9094 E-mail: info@nami.org Web Site: http://www.nami.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Antidepressant drugs, Cognitive therapy, Consumer education materials, Depression, Families, Monitoring, Parents, Safety, Treatment

Vernon A. 1989. Thinking, feeling, behaving: An emotional education curriculum for adolescents grades 7-12. Champaign, IL: Research Press, 243 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum helps adolescents to develop positive mental health concepts through a series of exercises in rational-emotive therapy (RET). Deriving many of its concepts from cognitive psychology, RET is a skills-based approach to problem solving. Simulation games, role playing, stories, written activities, brainstorming, and art sessions are designed to foster a sense of responsibility for actions and feelings. The exercises are arranged by age level and skill group.

Contact: Research Press, Dept. 28W, PO Box 9177, Champaign, IL 61826, Telephone: (217) 352-3273 Secondary Telephone: (800) 519-2707 Contact Phone: (217) 352-3273 Fax: (217) 352-1221 E-mail: rp@researchpress.com Web Site: http://www.researchpress.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Cognitive therapy, Communication, Curricula, Decision making, Mental health, Problem solving, Psychology, Self esteem

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.