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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (82 total).

Center for Health and Health Care in Schools. 2015. Partner. Build. Grow. An action guide for sustaining child development and prevention approaches. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, multiple items.

Annotation: This guide provides school administrators, program directors, civic leaders, and other stakeholders with tools to improve the sustainability of school-based approaches that promote students’ cognitive, social, and emotional health and educational success. Contents include practical steps for integrating evidence-based student supports into state and local systems. The guide breaks down policy advocacy steps into four interconnected prongs (mapping assets, building an action team, connecting with the policy environment, and communications) for mobilizing key allies, developing an action plan based on existing resources, accessing viable financing and regulatory strategies, and exploring communications strategies.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Cognitive development, Communications, Communities, Community action, Financing, Mental health, Policy development, Regulations, School health, Schools, Service integration, Students, Sustainability

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Patlak M, rapporteur; Institute of Medicine, Forum on Promoting Children's Cognitive Affective, and Behavioral Health; National Research Council, Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 2014. Strategies for scaling effective family-focused preventive interventions to promote children's cognitive, affective, and behavioral health: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 120 pp.

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Figlio DN, Guryan J, Karbownik K, Roth J. 2013. The effects of poor neonatal health on children's cognitive development. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 55 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18846)

Annotation: This paper discusses the results of a study on children born in Florida from 1992 to 2002, and the effect of birth weight on cognitive development from kindergarten through middle school. Study methodology is reviewed and results are discussed in the following categories: heavier versus lighter twins; testing; results by grade; differences by genetics, gender, maternal race, ethnicity and immigrant status; and family socioeconomic status. Topics also include birth weight discordance, school quality and the effect of birth weight on test scores, and birth weight gaps at kindergarten entry. A bibliography and statistical data conclude the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Florida, Learning, Low birthweight, Newborn infants, School readiness, State surveys, Statistical data, Young children

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

Aikens N, Klein AK, Tarullo L, West J. 2013. Getting ready for kindergarten: Children's progress during Head Start—FACES 2009 report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica; Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. , 11 pp. (OPRE report 2013-21a)

Annotation: This report describes the family backgrounds and developmental outcomes of children as they completed the Head Start program and also describes progress in children’s outcomes between Head Start entry and exit. It focuses on the population of children who entered Head Start for the first time in fall 2009 and completed one or two years of the program before entering kindergarten in the fall. Topics include development in cognitive, language, social-emotional areas, as well as child health and physical development.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Emotional development, Head Start, Language development, Physical development, Socialization

Kohl III HW, Cook HD, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Physical Activity and Physical Education in the School Environment. 2013. Educating the student body: Taking physical activity and physical education to school. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 488 pp.

Annotation: This report makes recommendations about approaches for strengthening and improving programs and policies for physical activity and physical education in the school environment. The report, which lays out a set of guiding principles for accomplishing this task, covers the following topics: (1) the status and trends of physical activity behaviors in the United States and related school policies; (2) health, developmental, academic, and cognitive outcomes associated with physical activity and physical education; (3) an overview and discussion of physical education programs in schools, including what a high-quality program looks like; (4) an overview and discussion of physical activity programs in schools; and (5) evidence for the effectiveness of physical activity and physical education programs and policies.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $59.00 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-28313-7.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Cognitive development, Educational attainment, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, Public policy, Research, School health, School role, Trends

Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Pasquariello J, Schiffmiller A, Frank DA, Coleman S, Breen A, Cook J. 2012. The SNAP vaccine: Boosting children's health. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief provides information about SNAP, a federal program that helps participants afford a nutritionally adequate diet each month, with a particular focus on ensuring that young children have adequate nutrition during this period of rapid brain development. The brief provides an overview of who SNAP supports and how it supports them, and also discusses food insecurity during the recession that began in 2008, other basic needs provided by the program, how the program helps immigrant families, how increasing SNAP benefit levels improves family diet quality and children's health, the cost of a healthy diet, and policy solutions.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Cognitive development, Cost, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Federal programs, Immigrants, Nutrition, Public policy, Supplemental food programs, Young children

Sachs N, McGarity TO, Steinzor R, Simpson A, Shudtz M. 2012. Protecting the public from BPA: An action plan for federal agencies. Washington, DC: Center for Progressive Reform, 33 pp. (White paper #1202)

Annotation: This white paper, which is intended to assist federal agencies in moving forward with Bisphenol-A(BPA) regulation and to provide the public with a more informative and safer consumer environment, outlines various short- and long-term regulatory options for protecting the public from health risks that BPA poses. The paper describes a two-prong approach, with the first phase focusing on immediate information collection and dissemination and the second including regulatory controls, standards, and protections to be promulgated as soon as missing information becomes available. The paper also discusses the current state of BPA, including known risks and regulatory safeguards; existing international, state, and local BPA controls, and regulatory efforts at the federal level.

Contact: Center for Progressive Reform, 455 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., #150-513, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 747-0698 E-mail: info@progressivereform.org Web Site: http://www.progressivereform.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Chemicals, Child health, Cognitive development, Diabetes, Endocrine diseases, Environmental exposure, Health, Infant health, Prevention, Public health, Reproductive health, Sexuality

Berger LM, McLanahan S,. 2012. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: Influences of parental characteristics, relationships, and behaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 43 pp. (Fragile families working paper: 11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines differences in child outcomes by family type, defined by the marital and biological status of parents who live with a child. The paper investigates the extent to which differences in cognitive skills and behavior problems among 5-year-olds living in different types of families are associated with differences in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors between family types. The authors then decompose the mean difference between family types in each outcome into the proportion explained by differences between family types in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors and the proportion explained by differences between family types in the influence of these factors on outcomes. Methods and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Families, Fathers, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Research, Statistical data, Young children

Child Care Aware of America. 2012. Executive function and school readiness. Arlington, VA: Child Care Aware of America, 4 pp. (Resource paper)

Annotation: This paper, which is geared toward parents, provides information about executive functions and how they relate to school readiness. The paper explains what executive functions are and discusses why they are important, how they are manifested, executive functions and child care, good practices in child care to promote the development of executive function, practices that hinder the development of executive function, and professional development for teachers. Additional resources are listed.

Contact: Child Care Aware of America, 1515 North Courthouse Road, 11th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 424-2246 Secondary Telephone: (866) 278-9428 E-mail: http://childcareaware.org/contact-us Web Site: http://childcareaware.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child care, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Health promotion, Professional education, School readiness, Young children

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2012. The science of neglect: The persistent absence of responsive care disrupts the developing brain. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 17 pp. (Working paper no. 12)

Annotation: This working paper discusses the effect of the absence of responsive care on the developing brain. The report explains the importance of responsive relationships to child well-being and how responsiveness and the lack thereof affect children's brains and their development. The problem of defining neglect is discussed, and four types of unresponsive care are presented (occasional inattention, chronic understimulation, severe neglect in a family context, and severe neglect in an institutional setting). Common misconceptions and the science-policy gap are discussed, along with implications for policy and promising intervention models.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child development, Child neglect, Cognitive development, Early childhood developing, Families, Infant development, Intervention, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Public policy, Relationships, Research

Child Trends. 2012. Early school readiness: Indicators on children and youth (upd. ed.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper explains what it means to be "school ready" and looks at what families, schools, and communities can do to get young children ready for kindergarten. Contents include trends; differences by poverty status, gender, parent's education level, parent's home language, race and Hispanic origin, and age; state and local estimates; international estimates; national goals; what works to make progress; and other related indicators. Data sources, statistical charts, endnotes, and references are provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Cognitive development, Early childhood education, School readiness, Social indicators, Young children

Harvard Center on the Developing Child and National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. [2011]. Three core concepts in early development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Center on the Developing Child,

Annotation: This website presents a three-part video series that depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics have improved our understanding of the way early experiences are built into the body and the brain. The three videos are (1) Experiences Build Brain Architecture, (2) Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry, and (3) Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development. The website also provides links to related resources.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Child health, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Genomics, Infant development, Infant health, Research, Stress, Young children

South Australia Department of Health. 2011. My health record. South Australia Department of Health, 76 pp.

Annotation: ‘My health record’ was developed with the assistance of parents, carers, child and family health nurses, midwives, social workers, dietitians, paediatricians, neonatologists, Aboriginal health workers and other health professionals. It is designed for parents to use from the time their baby is born through age 4. It covers birth details; tips on helping the child to grow and learn, tips on when to seek help, developmental milestones, and health checks for each year from 0 to 4; and has schedules for teeth eruption, growth charts, and immunization. It

Keywords: Guidelines, Cognitive development, Communicable diseases, Growth charts, Immunization, Infants, Language development, Medical history, Medical records, Motor development, Young children

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Immigrant children. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 266 pp. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 1, Spring 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines the well-being of immigrant children and what can be done to improve their education attainment, health, social and cognitive development, and long-term prospects for economic mobility. The issue discusses demographic trends, family arrangements, educational trends and differentials, health status, social integration, and participation in welfare and other public programs. Policies to improve the well-being of immigrant chldren are also presented.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-6-6.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Cognitive development, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Health, Immigrants, Public policy, Trends, Welfare

Baker M, Milligan KS. 2011. Maternity leave and children's cognitive and behavioral development. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 50 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17105)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of an expansion of Canada's paid maternity leave programs (expanding the duration of job-protected, partially compensated maternity/parental leave from approximately 6 months to a full year) on measures of children's cognitive and behavioral development at ages 4 and 5. The paper discusses previous literature on the topic, the reform and its expected impact, data, the empirical framework, differences in observable inputs across birth cohorts at ages 1 through 4, and estimates of the impact of the change on developmental outcomes at ages 4 and 5.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral development, Canada, Child development, Cognitive development, Costs, International health, Legislation, Parental leave, Public policy, Research, Working parents

Aratani Y, Wight VR, Cooper JL. 2011. Racial gaps in early childhood: Socio-emotional health, developmental, and educational outcomes among African-American boys. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that aimed to examine racial gaps in cognitive and socio-emotional development among boys in early childhood and to identify factors that contribute to early resilience among African-American boys. The report also presents theoretical models for understanding the racial gap.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Emotional development, Health, Health status disparities, Income factors, Infant development, Mental health, Prevention, Public policy, Racial factors

Wulczyn F, Ernsgt M, Fisher P. 2011. Who are the infants in out-of-home care?: An epidemiological and developmental snapshot. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 11 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief focuses on infants in the foster care system and their unique needs, developmental vulnerabilities, and strengths. The brief examines five key domains in which infants in the out-of-home population differ from older children, including (1) incidence of first-time out-of-home placements, (2) duration in care, (3) experiences in care, (4) characteristics, and (5) vulnerability for delayed development.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Emotional development, Families, Foster care, Foster children, High risk populations, Infant behavior, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Intellectual development, Low income groups, Motor development, Racial factors, Vulnerability

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.