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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

Big Cities Health Coalition. n.d.. Winnable battles case studies. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, Big Cities Health Coalition, 115 pp.

Annotation: These 12 case studies report on cutting-edge programs and innovative approaches to address the leading causes of death and disease in cities.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Case studies, Cities, Data sources, Health status, Health status disparities, Healthy People 2020, Public health infrastructure, Systems development

Rose K, Miller TK-N. 2016. Healthy communities of opportunity: An equity blueprint to address America's housing challenges. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between health and housing in urban policy; national housing trends and their implications for health; promising movements in the field to connect opportunity, health, and housing policy; and a policy framework to advance equity in health and housing.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cities, Costs, Equal opportunities, Hazards, Health status, Housing, Policy development, Reform, Regulations, Trends, Zoning

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention. 2015. Dating Matters® Initiative. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about a comprehensive dating violence prevention initiative focused on adolescents ages 11 to 14 in high-risk, urban communities. Contents include a video that describes the initiative and information about funding for implementation in middle schools and neighborhoods. The website also provides information about online training and profiles of grantees in Baltimore, MD; Chicago, IL; Ft. Lauderdale, FL: and Oakland, CA.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, Cities, Comprehensive programs, Financing, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Middle schools, National initiatives, Neighborhoods, Relationships, Training, Violence prevention

Juliano C, ed. 2015. Big cities health inventory. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, Big Cities Health Coalition, 129 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of the health of people living in dense, urban areas in the United States, how successfully they are addressing key health problems, and the challenges they face. Contents include information about the selection of cities and indicators, key themes, data limitations, city-by-city tables, case studies, and recommendations.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Case studies, Cities, Data sources, Health status, Health status disparities, Healthy People 2020, Public health infrastructure, Systems development

Murphey D, Redd Z, Moodie S, Knewstub D, Humble J, Bell K, Cooper M. 2012. Assessing the status and needs of children and youth in the national capital region (rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Child Trends, 165 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a comprehensive, baseline assessment of the status of children, adolescents, and young adults (from birth to age 24) in the National Capital Region (NCR), which includes the District of Columbia, two independent cities and four counties in Virginia, and two counties in Maryland, The report is organized in the following indicator sections: demographic characteristics; pregnancy and birth outcomes; infant, child, and adolescent health and safety; economic well-being; child welfare; and education. For each indicator, the report cites differences evident among the various jurisdictions of the NCR, as well as notable disparities along lines of gender, race and Hispanic origin, or age. The evidence on what works to improve conditions for youth is also summarized for many of the indicators. The report concludes with a summary of knowledge gaps and comments about interpretation.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cities, County programs, District of Columbia, Health planning, Health status, Maryland, Needs assessment, Regional planning, Statistical data, Virginia

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2012. Oral health in New York City. NYC Vital Signs 11(5):1–4., 4 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a portrait of preventive oral health care use among children and adults in New York City. Recommendations to reduce the risk for oral health problems and improve oral health care access are also discussed.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Cities, Data, New York, Oral health, Urban health

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2012. Pre-pregnancy weight and infant mortality in New York City. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 3 pp. (Epi data brief, no. 16)

Annotation: This brief examines maternal weight and infant mortality in New York City during the period 2008-2010. Contents include information and data on disparities in pre-pregnancy obesity by race and ethnicity. Additional content addresses the relationship between pre-pregnancy weight, infant mortality, mother's education, infant birth weight, and neighborhood poverty.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Barriers, Cities, Data, Epidemiology, Infant mortality, New York, Obesity, Pregnancy, Urban health

Prevention Institute. 2011. Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth (UNITY). Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute,

Annotation: This section of the Prevention Institute's website is designed to build support for effective, sustainable efforts to prevent violence before it occurs so that urban youth can thrive in safe environments with supportive relationships and opportunities for success. The website provides tools, publications, and strategies for preventing violence including information on how U.S. cities prevent violence and a searchable resource library. The UNITY RoadMap is also provided, which details the who, what, and how of effective, sustainable violence prevention.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Cities, Resources for professionals, Urban environment, Violence prevention

Sandy R, Liu G, Ottensmann J, Tchernis R, Wilson J, Ford OT. 2009. Studying the child obesity epidemic with natural experiments. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 51 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14989)

Annotation: This paper examines clinical records of successive visits by children to pediatric clinics in Indianapolis to estimate the effects on their body weight of environmental changes near their homes. Environmental factors include fast food restaurants, supermarkets, parks, trails, and violent crimes, and 13 types of recreational amenities derived from the interpretation of annual aerial photographs. The paper contains a literature review, and describes its data, its estimation strategy, results, and conclusions.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Body weight, Children, Cities, Communities, Environmental factors, Neighborhoods, Obesity

Baltimore City Health Department. 2009. The strategy to improve birth outcomes in Baltimore City. Balitmore, MD: Baltimore City Health Department, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes data on the high level of poor birth outcomes among African-American women in Baltimore, MD. To improve birth outcomes, it advocates and describes services in eleven areas: primary health care in medical home, obstetric care, home visiting, drug and alcohol treatment, intervention for domestic violence, mental health care, smoking cessation, family planning, nutrition support, breastfeeding promotion, safe sleep education.

Contact: Baltimore City Health Department, 1001 East Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 396-4398 E-mail: bchd2@baltimorecity.org Web Site: http://www.baltimorecity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Cities, Community programs, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maryland, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Strategic plans

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates: 60 largest U.S. cities–1995-1998. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 51(15):329-332, 343,

Annotation: This report highlights disparities in overall race- and ethnicity-specific infant mortality rates (IMRs) for the largest U.S. cities and describes differences among those cities. Tables and figures present data on birthweight and individual- and community-level factors among cities in the highest quartile for IMRs compared with those in the lowest quartile for each of three racial and ethnic groups including non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic infants.

Contact: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Cities, Ethnic factors, Infant mortality, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends

National League of Cities, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. 2000. City voices, children's needs: New ways of taking action. Washington, DC: National League of Cities, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on in-depth interviews with officials from 28 cities, summarizes the current challenges and emerging issues that these cities face as they respond to the needs of children and families. The report includes the following main sections: (1) overview, (2) connecting schools and communities, (3) ensuring safety and promoting positive youth development, (4) the impact of shifts to a new economy, (5) searching for new ways: community-wide collaboration, and (6) conclusion. The report also includes a list of participating cities and endnotes.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org $7.00 for nonmembers, $5.00 for members. Document Number: ISBN 1-886152-74-8.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cities, Collaboration, Communities, Community programs, Economic factors, Families, Safety, Schools, Surveys, Youth development

Golden Anniversary White House Conference on Children and Youth. 1960. Children and youth in the 1960s: Survey papers prepared for the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth. [Washington, DC]: Golden Anniversary White House Conference on Children and Youth, 340 pp.

Annotation: This collection of papers was specially prepared for Conference participants to provide them with specific background information on each major theme of the Conference. These themes are the current scene including young adults, suburbia, city housing and mobility; beliefs and values including religious development, values and ideals; health, education, employment, and leisure services; special problems of minorities, civil rights, migrants, marriage and divorce, and multi problem families; children with developmental disabilities and behavior problems; and community action.

Keywords: Adults, Behavior problems, Children, Children with developmental disabilities, Cities, Civil rights, Community action, Conferences, Divorce, Dysfunctional families, Education, Employment, Health, Marriage, Migrants, Minority groups, Religion, Social values, Suburban population, United States, Youth

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.