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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (141 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Goldfarb F, Levitz B, Hernancez J, DeMaio S, Smith MA, Ortman D, Felty w, Seuer S, and Russo L. 2019. Fabric not fringe: Weaving family involvement throughout training and practice for professionals and advocates working with individuals with disabilities and special health csre needs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 27 pp.

Annotation: This white paper approaches family involvement from the perspective of the family discipline itself, and the ongoing paradigm shift in family-centered care--from fringe to fabric. This document includes a summary of the history of family involvement in the LEND network and a series of 8 individual handouts which detail the definition, need, benefits, resources and strategies associated with each type of family involvement.

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Family centered care, Parent participation

Petek S, Metzker B. 2018. Improving access to dental services for individuals with developmental disabilities. Sacramento, CA: California Legislative Analyst's Office, 38 pp. (An LAO report)

Annotation: This report analyzes the extent to which oral health services are available and sufficient for individuals with developmental disabilities. The report provides background information and discusses problems with access to oral health services for this population, steps taken to address the problem, and causes of the problem. Recommendations for improving access are provided.

Contact: California Legislative Analyst's Office, 925 L Street,Suite 1000, Sacraemento, CA 95814, Web Site: http://www.lao.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Oral health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education. 2015. Policy statement on inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 43 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement sets a vision and provides recommendations to states, local educational agencies, schools, and public and private early childhood programs for increasing the inclusion of infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities in high-quality early childhood programs. Contents include information about the scientific base for the benefits of inclusion, the legal foundation for inclusion, challenges to inclusion in early childhood programs, partnering to build a nationwide culture of inclusion, and recommendations for state action.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Federal initiatives, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Infants, Learning, Legal responsibility, Policy development, Program development, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Schools, Young children

Special Olympics. 2014-. Project UNIFY toolkit. Washington, DC: Special Olympics,

Annotation: This toolkit provides resources to help schools implement Project UNIFY, an initiative that focuses on social inclusion that brings youth with and without intellectual disabilities together through sports and related activities. The resources describe Project UNIFY's vision, its major components, how to get started, implementation models, the connection to equal education and inclusion, evaluation reports, and the project's impact.

Contact: Special Olympics, 1133 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3604, Telephone: (202) 628-3630 Secondary Telephone: (800) 700-8585 Fax: (202) 824-0200 E-mail: info@specialolympics.org Web Site: http://www.specialolympics.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Physical fitness, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Inclusive schools, Information services, Mental retardation, School health programs, Sports

Zero to Three. (2013). Improving access to early identification and intervention: 211 LA County developmental screening and care coordination. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on the efforts of 211 L.A. County's Developmental Screening and Care Coordination Program, which works to encourage partnerships between health professionals and community organizations to identify children at risk for developmental delays. The brief provides information about the program and about the importance of identifying developmental delays early. A personal story about a parent and child who received help from the program is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services, Infant development, Infants, Infants with developmental disabilities, Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment, Service coordination, Young children

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health. 2013. National profile of children with special health care needs and autism spectrum disorders: Key findings from the 2009/10 NS-CSHCN and 2011/12 NSCH. Portland, OR: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes key findings on children with special health care needs and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). and the 2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). It explains what autism spectrum disorders are; discusses the impact of health system performance on families who have children with ASD; and assesses to what extent children with ASD are receiving the minimum quality of care based on measures derived from the national surveys. The report also discusses the extent to which home, school, and neighborhood environments influence CSHCN with ASD. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: http://www.cahmi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, National surveys, Reports

Pires S. 2013. Customizing health homes for children with serious behavioral challenges. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 22 pp.

Annotation: This resource brief serves as a tool to help states think through how to develop a health home approach that can meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbances. It provides a rationale as to why health homes under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should be customized for children and youth with serious behavioral health challenges and offers approaches to health home customization based on intensive care coordination models that incorporate an individualized, team-based care planning process. Drawing on evidence-informed-approaches for children with serious behavioral health challenges, the brief describes ways of designing health homes for this population that take into account federal health home requirements and the unique characteristics of these children. This brief is intended to help policymakers and their partners (including families and youth) make informed decisions and plans related to health homes under the ACA.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Health care reform, Medical home, Models, Policy, Program development, Service coordination

Spielberger J, Winje C, Gitlow E. 2013. Evaluation of the Capable Kids and Families program: Year 2 findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report provides findings from an 18-month evaluation to examine parent outcomes for families involved with the Community Partnership's Capable Kids and Families (CKF) program and for a comparison group of non CKF families who received services from other providers. CKF supports family functioning and fosters positive developmental outcomes for families raising children with disabilities or developmental delays from birth to age 6. The report discusses the following six broad domains: (1) understanding their child's strengths and needs, (2) helping their child learn and develop, (3) learning to advocate for their child, (4) support systems, (5) access to resources, and (6) positive interactions with their child. The report also provides information about the service experiences of CKF families and indicates other areas in which the CKF program could affect family well-being that could be explored in future research.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family support services, Infants with developmental disabilities, Infants with special health care needs, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Program evaluation, Programs, Research, Service delivery systems

UPMC Insurance Services Division. 2013. Perspectives on the Allegheny County Maternal and Child Health Care Collaborative. Pittsburgh, PA: UPMC Insurance Services Division, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the involvement of key partners and presents the personal stories of those central to the efforts of the Allegheny County Maternal and Child Health Care Collaborative to address parental depression and child development delay. The collaborative aims to improve health care services and delivery and outcomes for Medicaid-eligible mothers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, and their children. The report discusses the evolution of the collaborative and its phases, presents results, discusses transforming systems of community care and elements that make the project sustainable, and presents caregivers' perspectives. [Record in process]

Contact: UPMC Insurance Services Division, US Steel Tower, 600 Grant Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, Web Site: http://www.upmchealthplan.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Depression, Developmental disabilities, Families, Fathers, Health services, Interagency cooperation, Low income groups, Medicaid, Mental health, Mothers, Parents, Programs

Center for Health Care Strategies. 2013. Faces of Medicaid: Examining children's behavioral health service utilization and expenditures. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report and chartbook examines the use and costs of behavioral health services for children on Medicaid, particularly those who are in foster care and those with developmental disabilities. The report analyzes the types of services that drive the costs for these high-risk populations, including patterns of psychotrophic medication use and expenditures. It presents a description of the study methodology and data findings in key areas such as behavioral health care penetration and service use; mean behavioral and physical health expenditures; utilization and expenditures by service type; and expenditures by state medicaid payment and delivery structure. Key findings are presented in 66 exhibits throughout the report. The chartbook contains data graphs from the study to use in presentations or other resource materials.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Data, Evaluation, Foster children, Health care costs, Health care utilization, High risk children, Medicaid

Pires S, Grimes K, Gilmer T, Allen K, Mahadevan R, Hendricks T. 2013. Identifying opportunities to improve children's behavioral health care: An analysis of Medicaid utilization and expenditures. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 20 pp. (Faces of Medicaid data brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights key findings from an analysis of behavioral health use and expense for children in Medicaid in all 50 states. It presents data findings in key areas such as percentage of Medicaid dollars spent on children's behavior health; Medicaid and behavioral health enrollment by race, ethnicity, and age of child; Medicaid behavioral health service use and expense by aid category; and the use of traditional and alternate treatments and the use of psychotropic medication use among children in Medicaid. It contains a special focus on children in foster care and those with developmental disabilities.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Data, Evaluation, Foster children, Health care costs, Health care utilization, High risk children, Medicaid

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. 2012–. Practical oral care for people with developmental disabilities. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, multiple items.

Annotation: This report discusses the oral health needs of individuals with special health care needs (SHCN); access to oral health services, limitations of the existing oral-health-care delivery system in terms of serving SHCN; and oral health services financing for this population. The report also presents a strategic framework for improving the oral health of individuals with SHCN and provides examples of activities that can help state, territorial, and community oral health programs develop programs and initiatives to improve the oral health of those with SHCN.

Contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (866) 232-4528 E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov Web Site: https://www.nidcr.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Continuing education, Dental care, Developmental disabilities, Health care delivery, Oral health

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Catalyst Center. 2012. The Affordable Care Act and children and youth with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities (rev.). Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 12 pp. (AMCHP issue brief)

Annotation: This report describes selected provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that have implications for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders or other developmental disabilities(ASD/DD). The report also describes how state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs can maximize opportunities under the ACA to develop and strengthen systems of care for children and adolescents with ASD/DD. The report provides background on gaps in coverage faced by children and adolescents with ASD/DD and discusses affordability and adequacy of health care coverage for this population, key provisions of the ACA, health care coverage and benefits, and implications for state Title V MCH and children and youth with special health care needs program leaders. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Autism, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Costs, Health care systems, Health insurance, Legislation, MCH programs, Title V programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Community report from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network: Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among multiple areas of the United States in 2008. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the rise in the number of children diagnosed with autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), how children are identified and served in local communities, and the need for accelerated research. Contents include defining ASDs, how many people have ASDs, what is the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) network, results of monitoring and the prevalence of ASDs in national and state-by-state demographics, and how the data can be used. Additional information is provided on related topics and resources.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Surveillance, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Monitoring, National surveys, State surveys

Center for Law and Social Policy, Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care. 2012. Promote access to early, regular and comprehensive screenings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 10 pp.

Annotation: This electronic resource focuses on describing what infants and young children in child care need and offers 15 recommendations to help states move toward ensuring that these needs are met. The resource explains what infant screening is and why it is needed and discusses how states can ensure that infants and young children are screened for developmental delays. A bibliography, policy ideas, state examples, and online resources are included.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant development, Infant health, Infants with developmental disabilities, Public policy, Resource materials, State programs, Young children

Hanlon C. 2012. Supporting healthy development through medical homes: Strategies from ABCD III states. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 12 pp. (State health policy briefing)

Annotation: This policy brief draws from experiences of the Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD) III Learning Collaborative. Through ABCD III, five states (Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Oregon) have developed and tested models to improve care coordination for children with or at risk for developmental delay. The brief outlines opportunities, options, and lesson for state policymakers to consider to strengthen medical home initiatives by explicitly addressing the needs of children in four ways: including pediatric criteria in medical-home-qualification standards, creating pediatric learning collaboratives for medical home providers, educating non-medical providers about the patient-centered medical home, and using child-health and-development data to help medical home providers track progress and drive improvement.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development: Children with special health care needs, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Initiatives, Medical home, Program coordination, Public policy, Quality assurance, Service coordination, Statistical data

Danaher J. 2011. Eligibility policies and practices for young children under Part B of IDEA. [Rev. ed.]. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 21 pp. (NECTAC notes; no. 27)

Annotation: This document reflects the requirements and options to states under the Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1997 (P.L. 105-17). The relevant portion of the IDEA statute is included in the paper as are relevant sections from the current and the proposed federal regulations. Finally, analyses are presented of data gathered by the author from the states and jurisdictions regarding their eligibility criteria and classifications.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Education, Eligibility, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B

University of California, Davis, Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. 2011. Autism Distance Education Parent Training (ADEPT) Interactive Training: Module I--Strategies for teaching functional skills. [Sacramento, CA]: University of California, Davis MIND Institute,

Annotation: This online learning module provides tools and training to help parents teach their child with autism or a related neurodevelopmental disorder functional skills using Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) techniques. The learning module includes ten interactive lessons; forms and checklists; notes on accessibility; and a glossary of terms.

Contact: University of California, Davis, MIND Institute, 2825 50th Street, Sacramento, CA 95817, Telephone: (916) 703-0280 E-mail: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/contactus/ Web Site: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Life skills, Parent education, Parenting

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.