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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (71 total).

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2014-. Using social media in child welfare. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about using social media as a communication tool to improve outcomes and build supports for children and families. Contents include resources for child welfare agencies on topics such as developing effective guidelines and policies; resources on using social media technology in casework practice; and resources to help youth, parents, and other caregivers stay safe when using social media networks.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case management, Child welfare agencies, Children, Communication, Families, Interactive media, Safety

Quinterno J. 2013. A stronger safety net for America's children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers an introduction to some of the opportunities and challenges facing public safety net and work support programs. It summarizes key features of such initiatives and then explains their collective significance, paying special attention to their importance for the well-being and development of children. A review of limitations comes next, followed by an overview of some of the state-level reform efforts currently underway. The conclusion recommends several matters for the consideration of concerned public officials at the federal level.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, State initiatives, Welfare agencies

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. What is child welfare? A guide for health-care professionals. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 4 pp. (Factsheet )

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about child welfare. The fact sheets describes what child welfare agencies typically do. It also discusses how health professionals can help child welfare workers collaborate to support families and prevent child abuse and neglect, identify and support suspected child abuse and neglect, know the laws about confidentiality and privacy, use trauma-informed practices, and serve as resources for child welfare agencies and families. Also discussed is how how child welfare workers can help health professionals by ensuring that health professionals have what they need to treat children, helping children and families access health care services, and coordinating the health care needs of adolescents aging out of foster care. Resources for more information are included.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Family support services, Foster care, Health services, Legislation, Prevention, Service coordination

Martinez M, Rider F, Cayce N, Forsell S, Poirier J, Hunt S, Crawford G, Sawyer J. 2013. A guide for father involvement in systems of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about the importance of fathers in the lives of their children and identifies potential consequences of non-involvement. The guide also offers strategies for systems and families to help fathers become more involved. Topics include statistics about the presence or absence of fathers in their children's lives, why children need fathers to be actively involved, ways for systems of care to best support fathers' involvement in individual- and family-service plans, how systems of care can involve fathers in all dimensions of development, different cultural perspectives on fatherhood, the role of young fathers, grandfather involvement, and the role of fathers in the child welfare system.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Child development, Child welfare agencies, Cultural factors, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Grandparents, Parenting skills, Service delivery systems

Zero to Three. 2013. State child welfare policies and practices that support infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 5 items.

Annotation: This webinar presents findings from a 2013 survey of state child welfare agencies about the policies and practices that guide the agencies' work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated. It demonstrates how three states' policies and practices reflect a developmental approach to child welfare services for young children. The website includes links the audio presentation, the slides, and the survey upon which the webinar is based. A link to the print copy of the survey report is also provided.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Child welfare agencies, Maltreated children, National surveys, Policy, Research, Young children

Briar-Lawson K, McCarthy M, Dickerson N, eds. 2013. The Children's Bureau: Shaping a century of child welfare practices, programs, and policies. Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers, 342 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines the 100-year history of the Children's Bureau and highlights the ways it has influenced modern-day child welfare practices. Topics include lessons learned, family driven and community-based systems of care, addressing poverty as a child welfare strategy, youth and family engagement, successful transition to adulthood for foster youth, child protection, child maltreatment, social work, tribal and urban Indian child welfare, work force, leadership development, and envisioning the future.

Contact: National Association of Social Workers, 750 First Street, N.E., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20002-4241, Telephone: (202) 408-8600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 742-4089 Fax: E-mail: membership@naswdc.org Web Site: http://www.socialworkers.org $55.99, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087101-446-7.

Keywords: American Indians, Federal agencies, Child abuse, Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Foster care, History, Maltreated children, Poverty, Social work, Socioeconomic factors, Transitions, Work force

Lieberman A, Nelson K, eds. 2013. Women and children first: The contribution of the Children's Bureau to social work education. Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education, 249 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on the relationship between the Children’s Bureau and the social work community, a constant since the founding of the Bureau in 1912. It traces the interaction of the Children's Bureau with social work education and practice through scope, policy, and leadership changes, as well as collaboration between the Bureau and schools of social work to develop a dynamic training and technical assistance infrastructure throughout the United States.

Contact: Council on Social Work Education, 1701 Duke Street, Suite 200, Alexandria, VA 22314-3457, Telephone: (703) 683-8080 Fax: (703) 683-8099 E-mail: info@cswe.org Web Site: http://www.cswe.org $46.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087293-150-3.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Federal agencies, History, Social work, Work force

U.S. Children's Bureau. [2012]. The Children's Bureau legacy: Ensuring the right to childhood. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 233 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a history of the Children's Bureau from its inception in 1912 to 2012. The document describes the origins of the bureau and follows it through the ensuing century. Topics include the birth of the bureau, saving infants and restoring childhood (1912-1929), the Great Depression and social security (1930-1939), wartime and recovery (1940-1956), a growing government shrinks the bureau (1957-1973), sharpening the focus on child welfare (1974-1992), and partnering with families and working to improve outcomes (1993-2012).

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9780160917257.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families . 2012. Promoting social and emotional well-being for children and youth receiving child welfare services. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 21 pp.

Annotation: This information memorandum for state, tribal, and territorial agencies administering or supervising the administration of Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act, Indian Tribes and Indian Tribal Organizations, seeks to promote social and emotional well-bring for children and adolescents who have experienced maltreatment and are receiving child welfare services. The memorandum includes an overview of the issue and a discussion of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families' well-being framework, emerging evidence on the impact of maltreatment, requirements and policy opportunities, current state and county investments, screening and functional assessment, effective interventions, and maximizing resources to achieve better results.

Contact: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/acyf Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, American Indians, Child development, Child maltreatment, Child mental health, Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Intervention, Legislation, Public policy, Screening, Social service agencies, State agencies

Colvard J, Szrom, J. 2012. A developmental approach to child welfare services for infants, toddlers, and their families: A self-assessment tool for states and counties administering child welfare services. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 36 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment tool is designed to help states and counties prepare to meet the requirements of the 2011 Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act and conduct ongoing assessment and quality-improvement efforts. It aims to help states and counties assess how well their child welfare policies address the developmental needs of infants, toddlers, and their families; identify where and how policies and practices can be improved; and engage partners in taking constructive action. Topics include assessing and addressing the needs of infants, toddlers, and their families who become known to the child welfare system; creating foster care that promotes attachment and permanency; and training and supporting child welfare staff and other professionals involved in the child welfare system.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Families, Foster care, Foster children, Infants, Staff development, Training, Young children

Children's Bureau Express. 2011-2012. Children's Bureau centennial series. Washington, DC: Children's Bureau, 9 items.

Annotation: This website, which celebrates the 100th birthday of the U.S. Children's Bureau, provides links to recent and upcoming issues of the Children's Bureau Express (CBX), which feature a series of short articles about the political climate and social movements prevalent in the early 20th century that laid the groundwork for the creation of the Children's Bureau. CBX covers news, issues, and trends of interest to professionals and policymakers in the interrelated fields of child abuse and neglect, child welfare, and adoption. LInks to other issues of CBX, as well as other related links, are also provided on the site. Users can subscribe to CBX via the website or search past issues.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Anniversaries, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, Public policy

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2011. It's your life. Washington, DC: American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law,

Annotation: This website is geared toward helping adolescents in foster care who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) navigate the child welfare system. The site provides information about harassment, discrimination, and violence; homelessness and running away; health and sexuality; and state-specific resources. A 24-hour hotline is included. The site also adresses common questions, presents stories about LGBTQ adolescents, discusses life after foster care, and provides other related information.

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Child welfare agencies, Children's rights, Discrimination, Foster care, Homelessness, Homosexuality, Runaways, Sexual harassment, Violence

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2011. Tip sheet for early childhood-child welfare partnership: Policies and programs that promote educational access, stability, and success for vulnerable children and families. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information about federal polices and programs that promote access to high-quality, stable early care and education for children in the child welfare system and opportunities for strengthening collaborations between early childhood and child welfare systems. The tip sheet discusses the following topics: (1) Head Start eligibility, (2) child care subsidies, (3) child abuse prevention and treatment, and (4) use of Title IV-E funds. The following opportunities are also presented: (1) the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, (2) the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, and (3) state advisory councils.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child care, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Costs, Early childhood education, Eligibility, Federal programs, Financing, Foster children, Head Start, Home visiting, Legislation, Prevention, Public policy, Service delivery systems, State programs, Treatment, Young children

Children and Family Futures. 2011. The collaborative practice model for family, recovery, safety and stability. Irvine, CA: Children and Family Futures, 39 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is geared toward state and community collaborative groups, discusses 10 system-linkage elements that child welfare, substance abuse treatment, and juvenile court dependency systems, as well as other agencies and providers working with these systems, can use to collaborate with one another. Topic include the elements of system linkages; the mission, underlying values, and principles of collaboration; screening and assessment; engagement and retention care; services to children of parents with substance use disorders; efficient communication and sharing information systems; budgeting and program sustainability; training and staff development; working with related agencies; joint accountability and shared outcomes; and resources and tools for elements of system linkages.

Contact: Children and Family Futures, 4940 Irvine Boulevard, Suite 202, Irvine, CA 92620, Telephone: (714) 505-3525 Fax: (714) 505-3626 E-mail: contact_us@cffutures.org Web Site: http://www.cffutures.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child welfare agencies, Children, Collaboration, Communication, Community programs, Families, Financing, Juvenile courts, Parents, Screening, Service delivery systems, State programs, Substance abuse treatment, Training

U.S. Children's Bureau. [2010]. The Children's Bureau: A legacy of service ... a vision for change. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 15 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a brief history of the Children's Bureau and presents information about its mission, training and technical assistance, funding, research, monitoring, and special initiatives.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Federal agencies, History

Allen K. 2010. Health screening and assessment for children and youth entering foster care: State requirements and opportunities. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief reports on a 50-state survey conducted to understand the extent to which child welfare agencies require physical, behavioral, and oral health screenings and follow-up assessments upon a child's entry into foster care. It includes national screening and assessment recommendations for children and youth entering foster care from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Council on Accreditation, and summarizes individual state requirements. The appendix provides a state-by-state listing of the requirements and timeframes (in days) for children entering foster care.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior development, Child welfare agencies, Foster care, Foster children, Guidelines, Health screening, National surveys, Oral health, Physical activity

Allen K. 2010. Health screening and assessment for children and youth entering foster care: State requirements and opportunities. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief reports on a 50-state survey conducted to understand the extent to which child welfare agencies require physical, behavioral, and oral health screenings and follow-up assessments upon a child's entry into foster care. It includes national screening and assessment recommendations for children and youth entering foster care from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Council on Accreditation, and summarizes individual state requirements. The appendix provides a state-by-state listing of the requirements and timeframes (in days) for children entering foster care.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior development, Child welfare agencies, Foster care, Foster children, Guidelines, Health screening, National surveys, Oral health, Physical activity

Cooper JL, Banghart P, Aratani Y. 2010. Addressing the mental health needs of young children in the child welfare system: What every policymaker should know. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 23 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores what is currently known about the prevalence of young children (from birth through age 5) in the child welfare system, how the occurrence of maltreatment of neglect affects their development, and the services currently offered vs those that young children need. The brief is based on the "Strengthening Early Childhood Mental Health Supports in Child Welfare Systems" emerging issue roundtable convened by the National Center for Children in Poverty in June 2009. The brief explains why focusing on mental health in the child welfare system is important and discusses why it is appropriate to focus on young children, characteristics of young children in the system, mental heath needs, services being received, barriers to care, existing policy models that ensure access to care for young children, and opportunities.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child neglect, Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Infants, Low income groups, Maltreated children, Mental health, Public policy, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.