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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (360 total).

Berman C. n.d.. Project Zero to Three: [Final report]. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 48 pp.

Annotation: The main goal of this project was to improve services for infants and toddlers with disabilities (or at risk for disabililties) and for their families by developing an interstate network for early identification and intervention services for this population. Activities included a national network meeting, two regional conferences, an intensive course, small topical meetings, consultations, publications, and a newsletter. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103373.

Keywords: American Public Welfare Association, Children's Defense Fund, Collaboration of Care, EPDST, Early Intervention, Environmental Risk, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, High risk infants, Networking, PL 99-457, WIC Program

National Child Welfare Association. n.d.. Posters. New York, NY: National Child Welfare Association, 5 items.

Rutgers Occupational Training and Education Consortium. n.d.. Trauma training: Child development, trauma and the brain—The DYFS mental health screening program. Buhl, ID: National Family Preservation Network,

Annotation: This website links to a training guide and participant workbook that provide activities that focus on trauma as a way of understanding how children and adolescents in the child welfare system are especially vulnerable to mental health challenges. The training materials were developed to help providers think about the physical effects of trauma on children, adolescents and young adults; understand the biological underpinnings of their challenges; and identify children with a suspected mental health need. Included are activities to help providers administer the New Jersey Mental Health Screening Tool (MHST) to assist with identifying children who may have mental health need and require further assessment.

Contact: National Family Preservation Network, 3971 North 1400 East, Buhl, Idaho 83316, Telephone: (888) 498-9047 E-mail: director@nfpn.org Web Site: http://nfpn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children's mental health, Interventions, New Jersey, Screening, State programs, Training, Trauma

CrossBear S, LeGore S. n.d.. Family involvement in child-serving systems and the need for cross-system collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief reviews what has been accomplished to date in the development of the family voice in all child-serving systems including substance abuse, mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, trauma support, education, and primary care. The review indicates what needs to occur to create true cross-systems collaboration supporting family involvement, so that youth and their families can fully access the service and supports they need to obtain and maintain optimum health.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Families, Family centered care, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Service delivery systems

James Bell Associates. 2018. Formative evaluation toolkit: A step-by-step guide and resources for evaluating program implementation and early outcomes. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 65 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which is primarily intended for child welfare agencies and professionals to use in partnership with their evaluators, introduces the concept of formative evaluation, a method for evaluating programs during early implementation in order to inform program improvement and assess readiness for rigorous summative evaluation.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Manuals, Program evaluation

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2016. Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document provides the statutory basis for identifying persons who are required to report child maltreatment under certain circumstances for all of the United States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Lists include a description of the person required to report maltreatment, standards for making a report, privileged communications, and inclusion or other disclosure of the reporter’s identity.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children, Legal definitions, Legal responsibility, Legislation, Maltreated children, Oral health, Standards

Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities. 2016. WIthin our reach: A national strategy to eliminate child abuse and neglect fatalities. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 167 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents a vision for realigning organizations, communities, and priorities to identify and support children at highest risk of abuse or neglect fatality. Contents include recommendations for addressing the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native children and reducing child abuse and neglect deaths in disproportionately affected communities, improving leadership and accountability, grounding decisions in better data and research, and enhancing multidisciplinary support for families. A report fact sheet, social media toolkit, public meeting materials, deliberations, and resources on child abuse and neglect fatalities and National Child Abuse Prevention Month are also available.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Child abuse, Child death, Child neglect, Children, Decision making, Family centered care, Injury prevention, Leadership, Multidisciplinary approach, National initiatives, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Strategic plans, Systems development, Welfare reform

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Children's Defense Fund. 2015. Children in the states. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This report lists statistics by state for children participating in: federally subsidized programs, the National School Lunch program during FY 1996, the School Breakfast Program during FY 1996, and the WIC Food program during FY 1996. For each state there is also a page listing statistics in the form of "every 23 hours a baby died, every 7 days a youth committed suicide." These are for infant morbidity and mortality, violence, lack of prenatal care, child abuse, lack of health insurance, and teenage and unmarried mothers.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org $5.95 plus $3.00 shipping and handling for the first item ordered, and $1.00 for each additional item ordered.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Federal programs, Health insurance, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Statistics, Violence, WIC Program

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2015. Family engagement inventory. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information about family engagement practices across child welfare, juvenile justice, behavioral health, education, and early education. Contents include links to organizations, agencies, and information that support family engagement within three domains. Contents include methods, plans of action, processes, and/or policies designed to be used by frontline staff of each discipline to enhance or achieve family engagement; links to and information on selected practices and programs that are validated and supported by a documented, evaluative process as they relate to family engagement; and links to information and websites that provide additional literature about family engagement processes, methods, and programs.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child welfare, Early childhood education, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Methods, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Participation, Research

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2014-. Using social media in child welfare. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about using social media as a communication tool to improve outcomes and build supports for children and families. Contents include resources for child welfare agencies on topics such as developing effective guidelines and policies; resources on using social media technology in casework practice; and resources to help youth, parents, and other caregivers stay safe when using social media networks.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case management, Child welfare agencies, Children, Communication, Families, Interactive media, Safety

Children's Defense Fund. 2014. The state of America's children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, irregular.

Annotation: This series of reports is a compilation and analysis of national and U.S. state-by-state data on child population, child poverty, family structure, family income, housing and homelessness, hunger and nutrition, health, early childhood, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. Changes in key child and national well-being indicators are included.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Ethnic groups, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Trends

New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, Creative Media Institute. (2013). Ensuring child safety: A three-part video series for law enforcement personnel. Las Cruces, NM: New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, 3 videos.

Annotation: These three videorecordings, about 15-20 minutes each, help train law enforcement officers in New Mexico about child safety in traumatic situations involving abuse or neglect of children, and provides tips and procedures in minimizing trauma for children. Video topics include: (1) parental arrest, (2) abuse and neglect referrals, and (3) minimizing trauma.

Contact: Southwest Region-National Child Protection Training Center, New Mexico State University, PO Box 30003, MSC3470, Las Cruces, NM 88003, E-mail: sbucher@nmsu.edu Web Site: http://swrtc.nmsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child safety, Child welfare, Children, Law enforcement, New Mexico, Professional training, Trauma

Allen KD, Hendricks T. 2013. Medicaid and children in foster care. Washington DC: First Focus, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the health care needs of children in foster care and the role of Medicaid in providing health coverage for this population. The brief also highlights existing policy levers that may help address some of the health and well-being issues that children in foster care face.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Emotional instability, Foster care, Foster children, Health care systems, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Public policy

Pires SA, Stroul BA, and Hendricks T, ed. 2013. Making Medicaid work for children in child welfare: Examples from the field. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 63 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses Medicaid strategies that emerged from a project conducted by the Center for Health Care Strategies to explore strategies used in selected states to improve Medicaid for children in child welfare. The document also presents case studies highlighting the experiences of Arizona, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey and concludes with a discussion of cross-state observations and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Child health, Child welfare, High risk children, Massachusetts, Medicaid, Michigan, New Jersey, State programs

Golden O, Emam D. 2013. How health care reform can help children and families in the child welfare system: Options for action. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 31 pp. (Low-income working families, paper 25)

Annotation: This paper considers the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on child welfare families, specifically on youth aging out of foster care, parents and guardians of children in (or at risk of entering) the child welfare system, and children already involved in the system. It also offers potential strategies for action by state and federal child welfare and health officials, philanthropic funders, and outside expert to enhance coverage and improve care.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child welfare, Children, Expanded eligibility, Federal initiatives, Foster care, Foster parents, Health care reform, Health insurance, Low income groups, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State initiatives

Quinterno J. 2013. A stronger safety net for America's children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers an introduction to some of the opportunities and challenges facing public safety net and work support programs. It summarizes key features of such initiatives and then explains their collective significance, paying special attention to their importance for the well-being and development of children. A review of limitations comes next, followed by an overview of some of the state-level reform efforts currently underway. The conclusion recommends several matters for the consideration of concerned public officials at the federal level.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, State initiatives, Welfare agencies

Academic Pediatric Association, American Academy of Pediatrics. 2013. APA Task Force on Childhood Poverty: A strategic road-map. McLean, VA: Academic Pediatric Association, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper recognized the increasing prevalence of poverty for children in the United States, and reviews the short- and long-term effects on children's health and well-being. A road-map of strategies is presented involving public policy and advocacy, health care delivery, medical education, and research in a "war on childhood poverty."

Contact: Academic Pediatric Association, 6728 Old McLean Village, McLean, VA 22101, Telephone: (703) 556-9222 Fax: (703) 556-8729 E-mail: info@academicpeds.org Web Site: http://www.ambpeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Health care delivery, Low income groups, Medical education, Professional education, Public policy, Social policy, Socioeconomic factors

Jordan E, Szrom J, Colvard J, Cooper H, DeVooght K. 2013. Changing the course for infants and toddlers: A survey of state child welfare policies and initiatives. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends; Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of states and the District of Columbia about policies and practices that guide child welfare agencies' work in addressing the needs of maltreated infants and toddlers. It provides information about the survey; summarizes results related to assessment and services, infants and toddlers in foster care and their families (including post-permanency care for this population); training in early childhood development and developmentally appropriate practice; and data collection and analysis. An executive summary, an index of state policies and practices to support the development of young children, and a brief document about understanding and meeting the needs of birth parents are also available.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Foster care, Infants, Maltreated children, National surveys, Needs assessment, State surveys, Training, Young children

Child Welfare League of America. 2013. National blueprint for excellence in child welfare: Standards of excellence—Raising the bar for children, families, and communities. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 142 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint presents a vision for the future of child welfare that all children will grow up safely in loving families and supportive communities. The blueprint is intended to be a catalyst for change and also to serve as the basis for updating and creating Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) program-specific standards of excellence. The blueprint discusses CWLA vision and values and presents eight core principles and standards on the following topics: rights of children; shared responsibility and leadership; engagement/participation; supports and services; quality improvement; work force; race, ethnicity, and culture; and funding and resources.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $24.95 for non-members, $19.95 for members; also available as .pdf , $11.95 for non-members, . Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58760-152-1.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Communities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Family support services, Financing, Leadership, Programs, Racial factors, Safety, Standards