Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (407 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

Pittsburgh/Allegheny County Healthy Start. n.d.. Guidebook for healthy mothers, children, families. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Healthy Start Project, 70 pp.

Annotation: This directory lists a variety of programs and services in the Pittsburgh area that are available to mothers, children, and families. It also contains health tips and fact sheets for infant care. Topics include the following: 1) child health clinics; 2) dental health; 3) family health services; 4) family/home-based support services; 5) family planning services; 6) family support centers; 7) grief support; 8) health and safety programs; and 9) Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Pittsburgh/Allegheny & Fayette County Healthy Start, 400 North Lexington Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA Telephone: (412) 247-1000 Secondary Telephone: (412) 247-4009 Contact Phone: (412) 578-8003 Fax: (412) 578-8325 Contact E-mail: 104626@compuserv.com Web Site: http://healthystartpittsburgh.org/ Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Case management, Child care services, Community programs, Family centered services, Family planning, Family support services, Infant health, Outreach, Pittsburgh Healthy Start, Social services

Magrab P. n.d.. Networking and Community-Based Services for Children with Special Needs: [Final report]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Medical Center, 45 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to achieve comprehensive, coordinated, community-based services for children with special health needs and their families through improved collaboration among parents and public and private agencies at all levels within the service delivery system. Activities included maintaining a network of States, facilitating coalitions within States, brokering technical assistance, organizing conferences, and developing materials on topics such as the financing of services, service provision to culturally diverse groups, rural services, and collaboration between mental health professionals and other health care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147130.

Keywords: Child Care, Chronically Ill, Collaboration of Care, Community-Based Health Care, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Financing, Grandparents, Medicaid, Networks, Parent Support Groups, Parents, Rural Population

Anderson B. n.d.. Collaboration Among Parents and Health Professionals (CAPP) [Final report]. Boston, MA: Federation for Children with Special Needs, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project worked with the Technical Assistance for Parent Programs Project and the U.S. Office of Special Education Resources in order to increase and enhance parent involvement in the health care of children with disabilities and special health needs. The project sought to (1) prepare parents to assume an integral role in the health care of their children with disabilities; (2) promote effective communication and collaboration among health care professionals and parents in order to enhance health services for children; and (3) develop a national support system to ensure that parents have access to essential information and peer support. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152940.

Keywords: 99-457 Financing Intervention, Early Association for the Care of Children's Health (ACCH) Parent Networks, Health Professionals, L, Parent Education Parent Professional Communication Peer Support P, Parents

Spaite D. n.d.. Arizona Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona, 23 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the Arizona EMSC project was to reduce childhood mortality and morbidity by (1) providing broad-based training and education in pediatric emergency care to medical personnel involved in the prehospital and early hospital emergency medical care, and (2) helping establish childhood injury prevention programs throughout the State. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121909.

Keywords: Bicycle Helmets, Bicycle Safety, Car seats, Drowning, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Injury Prevention, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Seat Belts

Stuemky J. n.d.. Developing and Improving the Capacity of Existing Pediatric Emergency Medical Services in Oklahoma [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: University of Oklahoma,

Annotation: The State of Oklahoma has a limited and fragmented EMS system that has not adequately addressed the needs of its pediatric population. To decrease the negative outcomes of pediatric emergency care, this project: (1) Established a prehospital- and hospital-based data collection system to provide definition of emergency medical services for children (EMSC) and identify negative outcome factors; (2) developed and assisted a statewide consortium in support of EMSC issues; (3) provided pediatric prehospital and hospital care training to emergency medical technicians, nurses, and physicians; and (4) worked with Native Americas and Hispanic populations to prevent child abuse and related injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Abuse, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Shaken Infant Syndrome

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

Seattle Children's Hospital, Washington State Department of Health, Within Reach. 2017. Starting point guide: Resources for parents of children with special health care needs. Seattle, WA: Seattle Children's Center for Children with Special Needs, 31 pp.

Annotation: This directory provides an overview of resources for families who have children with health conditions or special health care needs in Washington. Topics include tips from parents, legal help, child care and respite care, child growth and development, community health, oral health, family support, financial information, health insurance information, hearing and vision services, information and referral, medical supplies and equipment, mental health, nutrition, recreation programs, school, and transportation. A form for use in case of an emergency is included

Contact: Seattle Children's Center for Children with Special Needs, P.O. Box 5371, M2-16, Seattle, WA 98105, Telephone: (206) 987-3736 Fax: (206) 884-5741 E-mail: cshcn@seattlechildrens.org Web Site: http://www.cshcn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child care, Child health services, Children, Community based services, Directories, Families, Family support services, Forms, Infants, Information services, Parents, Referrals, Special health care needs, State programs, Washington

National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness. 2017. Healthy children are ready to learn. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines how health affects school readiness. Topics include oral health and learning and how having a healthy family supports healthy child development. The fact sheet also explores how comprehensive services ensure that children are ready for school and how coordinated systems support health services. It is available in English and in Spanish.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Child mental health, Child safety, Family support services, Head Start, Infant health, School readiness, Spanish language materials, Young children

Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness. 2017. Home visiting programs: Reviewing evidence of effectiveness. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 pp. (OPRE report #2017-30)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a systematic review of home visiting research to determine which home visiting program models have sufficient evidence to meet U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) criteria for an "evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model." The brief also summarizes the evidence of effectiveness for the 20 program models that met DHHS criteria. Topics include favorable and sustained program impacts on primary and secondary outcome measures and whether or not the model has been replicated.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting, Maternal health, Measures, Model programs, Outcome evaluation, Parenting, Research, School readiness, Sustainability, Young children

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

Bartlett JD, Smith S, Bringewatt E. 2017. Helping young children who have experienced trauma: Policies and strategies for early care and education. Washington, DC: Child Trends; New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report describes early childhood trauma and its effects, offers promising strategies for early care and education (ECE) programs and systems to help young children who have experienced trauma, and presents recommendations for state policymakers and other stakeholders looking to support trauma-informed ECE for this group.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chlld care, Community based services, Early childhood education, Family support services, Policy development, Service integration, Systems development, Trauma care, Vulnerability, Work force, Young children

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2016. Promoting health equity. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to promote health equity in the community. Topics include education programs and policies, culturally competent health care, and housing programs and policies. Presentation and promotional materials are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early childhood education, Low income groups, After school programs, Child development centers, Community based programs, Community development, Community health centers, Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Education, Educational attainment, Equal opportunities, Financial support, Health care delivery, Health education, Health promotion, Housing, Kindergarten, Patient education materials, Public policy, Recruitment, Research, Retention, School based clinics, Training, Translation, Work force

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children. 2016. Parenting matters: Supporting parents of children ages 0–8. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 400 pp., brief (4 pp.)

Annotation: This report reviews research on parenting practices and identifies effective practices. The report also recommends ways agencies and others can support interventions that help more parents learn about effective parenting practices. A brief and webinar are also available.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Home visiting, Parenting support services, Prevention programs, Research

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.