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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (65 total).

Johnson J, Wright FD. 2019. Child maltreatment: The role of the dental professional. Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include defining the problem, the dentist's role in intervention, presenting problems that suggest child maltreatment, assessment and documentation, reporting, treatment for orofacial or dental trauma, and what oral health professionals can do to reduce child maltreatment.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Trauma

AcademyHealth. 2016. Which adverse childhood experiences are most predictive of health care costs among adults?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) associated with higher health care costs among adults. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Collectively, the studies included in the review report costs for three of 10 major ACEs: physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. The appendices contain definitions of terms, search terms and databases used in the review, and a description of systematic reviews and relevant primary research studies included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Costs, Evaluation methods, Life course, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Trauma, Women

Littrell J. 2015. Human trafficking in America's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 13 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist school officials in understanding how human trafficking impacts schools; recognizing the indicators of possible child trafficking; and developing policies, protocols, and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children. Topics include child sex trafficking, child labor trafficking, deconstructing perceptions and a victim-centered approach, risk factors and predictors, what to do about suspected trafficking, recruitment, impact on learning environment, and community involvement. The guide contains a sample protocol for school districts and describes U.S. government entities combating human trafficking, publications and resources, training, services, and terms and definitions.

Contact: National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-5000 Fax: (202) 403-5001 Web Site: http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, Child sexual abuse, Community action, Learning, Policy development, Protective factors, Protocols, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Training

Tower CC. 2014. Understanding child abuse and neglect. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 442 pp.

Annotation: This textbook covers a range of topics associated with child abuse and neglect. It provides an overview on the problem, considers the rights and responsibilities of parents and children, and reviews the effects of abuse and neglect on the development of children. Individual chapters cover physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and neglect. Other chapters examine ways to prevent or intervene in abusive situations through the judicial system and consider treatment methodologies including the use of foster care. The book also includes a chapter on adults who were abused as children but who had not reported the fact.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Children's rights, Emotional abuse, Families, Family characteristics, Foster care, Incest, Intervention, Legal issues, Parent rights, Parenting, Physical abuse, Prevention, Sexual abuse, Social work

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

Zweig J, Dank M. 2013. Teen dating abuse and harassment in the digital world: Implications for prevention and intervention. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 2 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on dating adolescents and abuse and harassment via digital media (i.e., online or via text messaging). The report provides background and discusses where and how abuse occurs; and what educators, parents, advocates, and adolescents should know. The link between abuse via digital means and other types of abuse is discussed, as well as strategies for prevention and intervention.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abuse, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child sexual abuse, Dating, Intervention, Physical abuse, Prevention, Relationships, Sexual abuse, Sexual harassment

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2012. The guide to clinical preventive services. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 212 pp.

Annotation: This guide reviews the evidence for and against many preventive services, including screening tests, counseling interventions, and immunizations, and recommends 64 preventive services shown to be effective. The guide presents recommendations first for adults, listing diseases, conditions, and treatments alphabetically. The next section is devoted to children and adolescents and discusses 15 topics. Immunizations are discussed in the next section. Topics in progress discusses disease and condition recommendations under review in 2012. Appendices include information on how recommendations are graded, a list of members of the task force, acknowledgements, information about the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and more resources.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 12-05154; ISBN 978-58763-421-5.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Exercise, Health care delivery, Health services, Injuries, Nutrition, Prevention, Screening, Sexually transmitted diseases, Substance abuse

National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. 2012. National plan to prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of children (rev. ed.). [no place]: National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, 28 pp.

Annotation: This national plan was developed to help prevent child sexual abuse and exploitation. The plan defines the nature and scope of the child sexual abuse and exploitation; acknowledges the need to build on the foundation of existing research, advocacy, and treatment; discusses the value of a national plan; encourages the development of prevention-focused policy; and describes a range of actions that include individual, community and policy level strategies to stop the demand for, and to prevent, child sexual abuse and exploitation. In efforts to accomplish the goals of prevention, six action areas are emphasized: research, public awareness, ending the demand, policies and organizational practices, collaborative practices, and funding. A glossary of terms is also provided.

Contact: National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, E-mail: preventtogether@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.preventtogether.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child sexual abuse, National programs, Prevention, Sexual assault, Strategic plans

Bell K, Terzian MA, Moore KA. 2012. What works for female children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This research brief examines programs and strategies that work and that do not work for improving health and mental health outcomes for females. A companion brief does the same for males. The brief synthesizes findings from 106 random assignment intent-to-treat evaluations of social interventions that targeted female children, adolescents, and young adults or co-ed interventions that provide separate data for the female subgroup. The brief introduces the problem and discusses interventions that address the following issues: academic achievement, delinquency, mental health, physical health and nutrition, reproductive health and sexuality, self-sufficiency, substance use.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Depression, Female adolescents, Female children, Health, Intervention, Mental health, Nutrition, Programs, Reproductive health, Research, Sexuality, Substance abuse, Young adults

Axley DL, Zendell AL. 2011. Sexuality across the lifespan for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. (Rev. ed.). Tallahassee, FL: Florida Disabilities Development Council, 114 pp.

Annotation: This instructional manual is designed to help parents and caregivers assist individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in their explorations of self and sexuality. The manual presents hints for family members, discusses adapting for different learning styles, and offers tips. The manual also offers ideas for addressing the following topics: understanding the differences between males and females (grades K-5), changes in the body (grades 4-8), becoming an adult (grades 9-12), beginning social skills (grades K-8 and ongoing), advanced social skills (grades 6-12 as ready), dating, and sexual or physical abuse. A companion resource guide for educators is also available.It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Florida Disabilities Development Council, 124 Marriott Drive, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32301-2981, Telephone: (850) 488-4180 Secondary Telephone: (850) 488-0956 Fax: (850) 922-6702 E-mail: fddc@fddc.org Web Site: http://www.fddc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Dating, Families, Parents, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse, Sexuality, Social skills, Spanish language materials

Prevent Child Abuse New York. [2010]. Preventing child sexual abuse. Albany, NY: Prevent Child Abuse New York, 5 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents information about child sexual abuse and how to prevent it. The paper describes what Prevent Child Abuse New York advocates for and provides background on child sexual abuse, including its scope and nature and its consequences.

Contact: Prevent Child Abuse New York , 33 Elk Street, Second Floor, Albany, NY 12207, Telephone: (518) 445-1273 Secondary Telephone: (800) 244-5373 Fax: (518) 436-5889 Web Site: http://preventchildabuseny.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child sexual abuse, Depression, Mental health, Prevention

National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. [2010]. Facts for prevention: The health impact on children and youth. [no place]: National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistics and research findings on child sexual abuse and assault in the United States. It describes the extent of the problem, the negative health outcome, and the long-range impact on children and youth.

Contact: National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, E-mail: preventtogether@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.preventtogether.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child sexual abuse, Data, Prevention, Reports, Sexual assault, Statistics

Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board. 2010. Reproductive health of urban American Indian and Alaska Native women: Examining unintended pregnancy, contraception, sexual history, and non-voluntary sexual intercourse. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, 63 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a study on pregnancies, births, sexual history and behavior, contraceptive use, non-voluntary sex, and unintended pregnancy among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women nationwide.

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Childbirth, Pregnancy, Reproductive health, Research, Sexual abuse, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Unwanted pregnancy, Urban population, Women, Women's health

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2009. Preventing child maltreatment. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 210 pp. (The future of children; v. 19, no. 2, Fall 2009)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores policies and programs on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Articles discuss the importance of an investment-driven prevention approach; characteristics of families associated with elevated risk for maltreatment; community-wide, parenting, and home-visiting prevention programs; preventing abuse and neglect by parents with drug or alcohol problems and preventing sexual abuse; and the present and future roles of the child protection system in preventing abuse.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-3-5.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child sexual abuse, Community programs, Drug abuse, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Prevention

Mbwanna K, Terzian M, Moore KA. 2009. What works for parent involvement programs for children: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet synthesizes findings from 67 evaluations of parent-involvement interventions for children ages 6-11 to identify components and strategies associated with successful programs and interventions. Programs sought to engage parents in efforts to achieve outcomes for their child such as academic achievement or attendance, a reduction in internalizing behaviors such as depression or anxiety and of externalizing behaviors such as aggression, avoidance of substance abuse, avoidance of risky sexual behavior, and achieving health and fitness. The fact sheet presents lessons learned from programs that work, don't work, or have mixed results.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Anxiety, Child behavior, Child health, Children, Depression, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parent child relations, Parents, Prevention, Program evaluation, Programs, Sexual behavior, Substance abuse

Nunez-Smith M, Wolf E, Huang HM, Chen PG, Lee L, Emanuel EJ, Gross CP. 2008. Media and child and adolescent health: A systematic review. San Francisco, CA: Common Sense Media, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of the evidence regarding the impact of media quantity and content on the health of children and adolescents. Specifically, the report looks at seven outcomes: obesity, tobacco use, drug use, alcohol use, low academic achievement, sexual behavior, and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The report objectives include summarizing the evidence on the impact of media on health, evaluating the methodological rigor of existing research, and identifying areas in need of additional study. An executive summary is also available.

Contact: Common Sense Media, 650 Townsend, Suite 375, San Francisco, CA 94103, Telephone: (415) 863-0600 Fax: (415) 863-0601 E-mail: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/contact Web Site: http://www.commonsensemedia.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Child health, Drug abuse, Mass media, Obesity, Research, Smoking, Substance abuse

Leiderman S, Almo C. 2006. Interpersonal violence and adolescent pregnancy: Prevalence and implications for practice and policy. (2nd ed.). Bala Cynwyd, PA: Center for Assessment and Policy Development; Washington, DC: National Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Prevention, 38 pp. (Making a difference...)

Annotation: This report highlights information about the links between interpersonal violence and adolescent pregnancy; findings are based on a review of literature and interviews with experts in several fields. The report is designed to inform the work of practitioners, programs planners, evaluators, researchers, youth advocates, legislators, and leaders of community-based coalitions and task forces. Section topics include the relationship between interpersonal violence and adolescent pregnancy; implications for interventions and policy; and next steps to consider. A bibliography and interview list are provided.

Contact: Center for Assessment and Policy Development, 268 Barren Hill Road, Conshohocken, PA 19428, Telephone: 610.828.1063 Fax: (610) 664-6099 E-mail: sleiderman@capd.org Web Site: http://www.capd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Child abuse, Child sexual abuse, Interpersonal violence, Intervention, Research

Melnyk BM, Moldenhauer Z, eds. 2006. The KySS (Keep Your Children/Yourself Safe and Secure) guide to child and adolescent mental health screening, early intervention, and health promotion. Cherry Hill, NJ: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, 273 pp., 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on mental health screening and early intervention and mental health promotion for children and adolescents, covers the following topics: (1) assessing and screening for common mental health problems, (2) diagnosing, managing, and preventing mental health disorders, (3) anxiety disorders, (4) attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, (5) eating disorders, (6) grief and loss, (7) mood disorders, (8) marital separation and divorce, (9) maltreatment, (10) sexuality, (11) substance abuse, (12) violence, (13) reimbursement, and (14) brief interventions. Each chapter contains summaries, checklists, questionnaires for parents and youth in English and Spanish, information on other tools, and resources. Some chapters include DSM-IV criteria for specific problems. An index is included.

Contact: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, 20 Brace Road, Suite 200, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, Telephone: (856) 857-9700 Fax: (856) 857-1600 E-mail: info@napnap.org Web Site: http://www.napnap.org $50.00, pus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Anxiety, Attention deficit disorder, Child mental health, Divorce, Early intervention, Eating disorders, Grief, Health promotion, Maltreated children, Mental disorders, Prevention, Questionnaires, Reimbursement, Screening, Sexuality, Spanish language materials, Substance abuse, Violence

Grymes J. [2005]. Healthy Families of Luzerne County: Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program. Kiingston, PA: Family Enhancement Center, Luzerne Wyoming Counties Mental Health Center, 26 pp.

Annotation: This final report focuses on the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program, located in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, during the period August 1, 1999, to February 28, 2005. The purpose of the project was to identify and intervene early with at-risk families to address and prevent situations of abuse, illiteracy, and ill health or malnutrition. Report sections include (1) purpose of project and relationship to Socal Security Administration (SSA) Title V maternal and child health programs, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of resources needed to replicate. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child abuse, Domestic violence, Families, Final reports, Health, High risk groups, Malnutrition, Pennsylvania, Poverty, Sexual abuse

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 2004-. Child maltreatment, __: Reports from the states to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, annual.

Annotation: This annual report synthesizes information provided by state child protective service agencies to the federally mandated National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). It reviews the background of the data collection process; analyzes the national child abuse and neglect data for the year being covered; considers the detailed case data component of NCANDS with examples of some of the types of analyses that can be made of the data; and discusses future directions. Data gathered include: age, sex, race or ethnic group of victims, types of abuse, case dispositions and descriptive information on perpetrators. Appendices contain listings for state advisory group representatives, summary data component tables, and state responses to the summary data component and state comments. This report was previously published under the title: "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 1: 1990 Summary Data Component, " and "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 2: 1991 Summary Data Component."

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Crime, Data collection, Demographics, Emotional abuse, Federal programs, National data, Sexual assault, State data reports, State surveys, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.