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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (175 total).

Close AK, ed. n.d.. Nutrition education in child feeding programs in the developing countries. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of State, Agency for International Development, Office of Nutrition, 44 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended to assist village workers at the grass roots level and others in developing countries in teaching mothers and children about the foods children need for growth and health and how to use local foods to improve their diets. Some topics in the manual are: 1) setting goals to fit your community, 2) general rules for teaching, 3) working with mothers of preschool children, and 4) teaching children in school feeding programs. An appendix includes weight and height charts, a questionnaire for learning children's food habits, and other helpful publications. It was prepared in cooperation with the Maternal Child Health Service, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Contact: U.S. Agency for International Development, Technical Assistance Bureau, Washington, DC 20523 , Price unknown.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Child nutrition programs, Developing countries, Nutrition disorders, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Training materials

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

Swartz JM. n.d.. Development of study of the nutritional status of children and youth registrants. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 46 pp. (Study series no.: 1-7 (16))

Annotation: This paper is a proposal for a study to make recommendations for improvement of delivery of nutritional services in programs supported by the Maternal and Child Health Service, as well as in the development of future programs. The need for such studies, the relationship of the Children and Youth Project, the purpose and design of the proposed study, development of the observation instrument, a pilot study, and summary of study modifications are presented. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health programs, Child nutrition, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Research, Title V programs

Healthiest State Initiative. 2020. 5 2 1 0 Healthy Choices Count: Action guide--Early care, education, after-school. Des Moines, IA: Healthiest State Initiative, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide is part of the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Choices Count Program, an evidenced-based prevention framework to promote healthy habits. The guide discusses how early care and education sites can adopt a whole child approach to wellness and education by providing healthy foods in the classroom and cafeteria and creatively increasing physical activity throughout the day. The guide explains why the 5-2-1-0 method works and presents 10 strategies for success. It also discusses how to implement the program in an early care or education site in five steps: engage, register, implement, share, and check in.

Contact: Healthiest State Initiative, 301 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50309, Telephone: (515) 650-6854 Web Site: http://www.iowahealthieststate.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Nutrition, Physical activity, Preschool children, Prevention, School health programs, Young children

Healthiest State Initiative. 2020. 5 2 1 0 Healthy Choices Count: Action guide--Health care. Des Moines, IA: Healthiest State Initiative, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals is part of the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Choices Count Program, an evidence-based prevention framework to promote healthy habits. The guide discusses how health professionals can use the 5-2-1-0 method to help children stay healthy. It explains how health professionals can implement the program in five steps: engage, register, implement, share, and check in.

Contact: Healthiest State Initiative, 301 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50309, Telephone: (515) 650-6854 Web Site: http://www.iowahealthieststate.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health programs, Nutrition, Physical activity, Prevention, School age children, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2020. Identifying evidence-based and evidence-informed nutrition interventions to advance maternal health in Title V Maternal and Child Health Services block grant programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 5 pp.

Annotation: This maternal and child health nutrition program brief reviews opportunities to identify appropriate maternal health-related evidence-based and -informed nutrition interventions to advance Title V MCH Services Block Grant Programs’ national performance measures (NPMs) using online databases.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Evidence based programs, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Title V programs

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign. [2017?]. Framework for action: Addressing nutrition and physical activity through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a supplement to “State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action.” This supplement provides more detailed recommendations for supporting nutrition and physical activity during the school day through the Every Student Succeeds Act implementation.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org

Keywords: Nutrition, Adolescent health, Child health, Physical activity, School age children, School health programs, Students

Ashbrook A, Hartline-Grafton H, Dolins J, Davis J, Watson C. 2017. Addressing food insecurity: A toolkit for pediatricians. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics and Food Research and Action Council, 38 pp.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help pediatricians and their practice teams screen for food insecurity, connect families with food and nutrition resources in the community, and support national and local policies that increase access to adequate healthy food for all children and their families. Contents include an infographic, information on food insecurity and federal nutrition programs, tips on preparing for and using the Hunger Vital Sign (a validated screening tool), interventions to address food insecurity, and resources to support advocacy and educational efforts.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Consumer education, Families, Federal programs, Food, Intervention, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutrition programs, Pediatric care, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Screening

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. 2015 annual report on the quality of care for children in Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report shows the progress made by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and states to systematically measure and report on the quality of care that children enrolled in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) receive. Contents include information about state-specific findings on quality and access in Medicaid and CHIP and monitoring and improving care for children enrolled in managed care. Topics include primary care access and preventive care, management of acute and chronic conditions, childhood obesity, oral health care, prenatal and postpartum care, and adolescent well care.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Child health, Children's Health Insurance Program, Federal programs, High risk children, Managed care, Measures, Medicaid, Nutrition, Oral health, Perinatal health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, State programs

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2016. Preventing childhood obesity in Michigan's classrooms: A collaboration between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and statewide partners. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes Building Healthy Communities, a school-based prevention program in Michigan to help children adopt healthy habits at a young age by providing access to healthy food, health education, physical education, and physical activity. Contents include a description of the program's development and implementation process, outcomes, and next steps. Topics include partnering organization efforts to pool funding, resources, and expertise to engage elementary schools and expand to middle and high schools throughout the state.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Children, Collaboration, Curriculum, Elementary schools, Health behavior, Health promotion, High schools, Michigan, Middle schools, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Obesity, Outcome and process assessment, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, School health education, School health programs, State programs, Statewide planning

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Friends of Children Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters: Poverty and child health–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 21 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of program summaries describes the approaches of American Academy of Pediatrics' state chapters to develop and implement programs focused on poverty and child health in California, New York City, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Topics include developing and using innovative technologies to address food insecurity, pediatricians promoting food security, ensuring the delivery of health and developmental screening services to young children who are homeless, supporting adolescent parents and their children, and accessing summer meal programs. Each summary includes information about program collaboration, evaluation and measurement, outcomes, barriers and lessons learned, and future plans.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, Developmental screening, Food, Health screening, Healthy People 2020, Homeless persons, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition, Poverty, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships

Trust for America's Health. 2015-. State of childhood obesity. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, annual.

Annotation: This resource provides information about obesity among young children, adolescents, and adults in the United States. Contents include obesity rates and trends by age, household income, and race and ethnicity; policy analysis; state briefs; fast facts; and other resources. Topics include the relationship between weight and diabetes, hypertension, and physical inactivity; the health care costs of obesity; food insecurity, food deserts, and healthy weights; and socioeconomics and obesity.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Barriers, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Data sources, Financing, Health status, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Schools, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Trends, Young children

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Delta Dental Foundation, Michigan Dental Association Foundation. 2015. From drool to school: Caring for your child's oral health from the drool years through the school years [upd.]. [Lansing, MI]: Delta Dental Plan of Michigan, 56 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for parents provides information on how to care for an infant’s or child’s oral health from birth through the elementary school years. The booklet also includes information about how to find and pay for oral health care and activities that parents can do with their child to help them learn together about the importance of good oral health. The booklet is available in Arabic, English, and Spanish. A brochure and a video are also available.

Contact: Delta Dental Foundation, 4100 Okemos Road, Okemos, MI 48864, Telephone: (800) 524-0149 Web Site: http://www.deltadentalmi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Dental care, Infants, Michigan, Non English language materials, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Pregnant women, Preschool children, Preventive health services, School age children, State programs

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health. 2014–. Tooth Talk: Videos. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health; Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Oral Health Section, multiple items.

Annotation: These videos for Head Start staff and other child care and early education professionals address oral health care for pregnant women, infants, and young children. Topics include the importance of early oral health care, fluoride varnish, healthy eating, toothbrushing, weaning from a bottle, and motivational interviewing. Many of the videos are appropriate for sharing with parents.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 170 Rosenau Hall, CB #5400, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, E-mail: sphcomm@listserv.unc.edu Contact E-mail: toothtalkchat@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.sph.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Dental care, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Early Head Start, Fluorides, Head Start, Infants, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Young children

Association of State Public Health Nutritionists Maternal and Child Health Council. 2014. ASPHN story bank. Johnstown, PA: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, 5 items.

Annotation: This resource focuses on state agency efforts to promote good nutrition in the maternal and child health population. Contents are listed by topic and by state. Topics include: nutrition standards; salad bars in schools; organizational change with multiple agencies; leadership; farm to institution; healthy beverages; home visiting programs; and healthy communities. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Child health, Collaboration, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Nutrition, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public health nutritionists, State MCH programs, Strategic planning, Systems development, Training

Connell C. 2014. Procuring local foods for child nutrition programs. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 116 pp.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. 2014. Maryland WIC farmer's market cookbook. [Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Agriculture], 24 pp.

Annotation: This cookbook for families enrolled in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides information on finding fresh, nutritious food at farmer's markets. Topics include reasons to shop at a farmer's market and how to use WIC checks to buy fruit and vegetables in season at the farmer's market. Additional contents include tips on food safety, storage, and preparation; recipes; a list of farmers' markets in Maryland; and information from national public health campaigns for pregnant women.

Contact: Maryland Department of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD 21401, Telephone: (410) 841-8106 Secondary Telephone: (301) 261-8106 Fax: (410) 841-5914 Web Site: http://mda.maryland.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cookbooks, Food handling, Fruit, Infants, Maryland, Nutrition, Pregnant women, Recipes, State programs, Vegetables, WIC Program

Rockeymore M, Moscetti C, Fountain A. 2014. Rural childhood obesity prevention toolkit. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 53 pp., exec. summ. (3 pp.).

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.