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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (200 total).

Federal Security Agency, Social Security Administration, Children's Bureau. n.d.. Infant and childhood mortality, maternal mortality, natality: 1947 chart book of trend data for the United States; profile data for each state. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 93 pp.

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Brown M. n.d.. Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project: [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the project address the leading causes of childhood mortality in Oklahoma - motor vehicle crashes, submersions and burns. The overall methodology focused on utilization of intra- and interagency coalitions. Specific strategies included car seat loaners programs, drowning and burn prevention education activities, and smoke alarm programs. The project successfully carried out objectives related to prevention of motor vehicle injuries, drowning and burns. By empowering collaborating agencies and programs, the project has assured continuation of a focus on prevention of pediatric injuries in Oklahoma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161569.

Keywords: Burns, Car Seats, Child, Community-Based Education Programs, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Parents, Poisons, Safety

Danielson C. n.d.. Healthy Foundations [Final report]. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: The project's goals were to: (1) Develop and implement structures and processes in defined community areas to plan and implement a family-centered, community-based health care delivery system for children; (2) develop data system capacity and function statewide to ensure family-centered, community-based primary care services for children; and (3) share experiences in family-centered, community-based system change in the area of primary health care for children with other State, regional, and national maternal and child health providers. At the State level, strategies were directed toward developing a system of children's primary health care delivery that was family centered and community based. At the local level, child health steering committees in established projects were to continue to plan and implement child health system changes in their service areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Child Mortality, Community Based Health Services, Databases, Family Centered Health Care, Information Systems, Primary Care, Standards of Care, State Programs

Radley DC, McCarthy D, Hayes SL. 2017. Aiming higher: Results from the Commonwealth Fund scorecard on state health system performance–2017 edition. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, annual.

Annotation: This report ranks states on more than 40 indicators of health system performance in five broad areas: health care access, quality, avoidable hospital use and costs, health outcomes, and health care equity. It also compares and evaluates trends across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adults, Children, Dental care, Equal opportunities, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, Infants, Measures, Morbidity, Mortality, Obesity, Oral health, Preventive health services, Smoking, State initiatives, Statistics, Systems development, Trends

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Lai YH, Karp C, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp. (brief 3 pp.).

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

National Birth Defects Prevention Network. 2017. World Birth Defects Day. Houston, TX: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to raise awareness of birth defects and expand surveillance, prevention, care, and research worldwide. Contents include a video, social media resources, and partner links.

Contact: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 1321 Upland Drive, Suite 1561, Houston, TX 77043, E-mail: nbdpn@nbdpn.org Web Site: https://www.nbdpn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, Congenital anomalies, Infant mortality, Infants, International health, Mass media, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Young children

National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. 2016. Guidance for CDR and FIMR teams on addressing vicarious trauma. Washington, DC: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guidance is designed to help partners engaged in the fetal infant mortality review (FIMR) or child death review (CDR) process address the vicarious trauma (VT) that can result from exposure to child deaths. Contents include the definition, signs, and symptoms of VT; VT and fatality review; the risk factors for VT; and steps to mitigate the impact of VT. Topics include positive ways to respond to VT including what the FIMR/CDR team, can do, what the FIMR/CDR coordinator can do, and how the agency can support the FIMR or CDR program; what individuals can do for themselves; negative ways to respond to VT including what a state FIMR/CDR coordinator can do if a team resists discussion or activities concerning VT or thinks it doesn't need them. Descriptions of articles, self-inventory checklists, presentations, and other resources are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Infant mortality, Leadership, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Role, Teamwork, Trauma, Trauma care

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. Title V program approaches to lower non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes efforts to reduce non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks and methods that Title V programs can use to improve birth outcomes. Contents include information about the health and financial implications of non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks gestation; key priorities at the national level; and example strategies in California, Oklahoma, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas. Information about the role of Title V as conduit, expert advisor, expediter, and funder of initiatives is included.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Childbirth, Collaboration, Costs, Health care reform, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Measures, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Risk factors, Role, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Kane D, and Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, Office of the Inspector General. 2015. Report to the governor and the General Assembly. Chicago, IL: Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, 283 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on investigations of misconduct, misfeasance, malfeasance, and violations of rules, procedures, or laws by Illinois Department of Children and Family Services employees, foster parents, service providers, and contractors with the Department. The document includes a special report on sleep-related infant deaths where parents were investigated by child protection services despite the absence of either drug or alcohol abuse or other blatant disregard.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child protective services, Illinois, Infant mortality, SIDS, Sleep environment, Sleep position, State agencies

Isbell M, Simpson I. 2015. Saving lives, protecting futures: Progress report on the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. New York, NY: Every Woman Every Child, 109 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, an international initiative to promote partnership, coordinate, and coherence in efforts to prevent women's and children's deaths and improve lives, advances made over the past five years, and how they have been achieved. Topics include progress in reducing maternal and child mortality and morbidity, catalyzing innovation to improve women's and children's health, accountability for results for women and children, mobilizing essential resources for women's and children's health, lessons learned, and building on gains to date in the post-2015 era.

Contact: Every Woman Every Child, United Nations Foundation, 801 Second Avenue, Suite 900, New York, NY 10017, Web Site: http://www.everywomaneverychild.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, International health, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Prevention, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, Strategic plans

Baltimore Healthy Start. 2014-. Baby buggy walk in the park. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This resource describes a national infant mortality awareness initiative that provides park activities to empower women of reproductive age and new mothers to take charge of their health and the health of their children through activities on eating right, making time for exercise, and other topics for Healthy Start families. The site provides a toolkit to help communities plan a similar event, with resources on getting started, recruiting sponsors, and other steps, along with sample documents and campaign materials.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building , 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (800)444-6472 Fax: (301)251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Public awareness campaign, Children, Community participation, Community programs, Families, Health fairs, Health promotion, Infant mortality, Prevention programs, Recreational programs, Women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2014. The health consequences of smoking: 50 years of progress–A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 943 pp., exec. summ. (22 pp.).

Annotation: This report chronicles the consequences of 50 years of tobacco use in the United States. Topics include the relationship between smoking and health outcomes; smoking-attributable morbidity, mortality, and economic costs; patterns of tobacco use among children, adolescents, and adults; status of and future directions in tobacco control; and a vision for ending tobacco-caused death and disease.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Cause of death, Children, Costs, Disease prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Progress reports, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2014. Let's make the next generation tobacco-free: Your guide to the 50th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 20 pp.

Annotation: This consumer guide details the effects of smoking including nicotine addiction and serious disease. It also contains facts on the benefits of quitting smoking and free resources that are available to smokers who want to quit. The guide is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Cause of death, Children, Consumer education materials, Costs, Disease prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Progress reports, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

Connecticut Office of the Child Advocate, and Connecticut Child Fatality Review Panel. 2014. Alert: Unsafe sleep related deaths are the leading cause of preventable deaths of infants in Connecticut. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Office of Governmental Accountability, Office of the Child Advocate, 8 pp.

Annotation: This public health alert outlines infant fatalities and unsafe sleep conditions in Connecticut and provides recommendations for prevention. Contents include risk factors associated with infant fatality including sudden unexplained or undetermined infant death, case examples, and a definition of an unsafe sleep-related infant fatality. Additional content includes information on how often infants die from unsafe sleeping conditions; the most common unsafe sleep environments in fatality cases; infant fatalities over time and trends; and the Connecticut Department of Children and Families' role in infant death prevention and policy development. The alert includes recommendations for policymakers, in-home service providers, child care providers, pediatricians, and hospitals, and safe sleep guidelines for parents.

Contact: Connecticut Office of Governmental Accountability, Office of the Child Advocate, 999 Asylum Avenue, 1st Floor, Hartford, CT 06105, Telephone: (860) 566-2106 Secondary Telephone: (800) 994-0939 Fax: (860) 566-2251 E-mail: oca@ct.gov Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/oca Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Connecticut, Infant death, Infant mortality, Policy development, Protective factors, Public awareness materials, Risk factors, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, State programs, Trends

Lee V. 2014. Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) To Reduce Infant Mortality: Update on regions IV, V and VI. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 16 pp.

Annotation: This set of slides describes the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality, including its aims, strategies, and measures, including reducing early elective delivery and smoking rates among pregnant women, increasing safe sleep practices and mothers delivering infants at the appropriate level of care, and changing Medicaid policies to increase the number of women who receive interconception care. It provides data showing trends from 2011 to 2013 and other accomplishments and the secrets of its success. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/mchbadvisory/InfantMortality/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Infant mortality, Perinatal care, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Regional programs, Smoking, Women's health

World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. 2014. The PMNCH 2014 accountability report: Tracking financial commitments to the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, 56 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.).

Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation. 2014. Levels and trends in child mortality. New York, NY: UNICEF, the United Nation's Children's Fund, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report presents estimates of child mortality and assesses progress towards the Millennium Development Goal 4 (reducing the under-five, infant, and neonatal mortality rate by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015) at the country, regional, and global levels. (Note: Estimates presented in this report may differ from and are not necessarily comparable with previous sets of estimates or the most recent underlying country data.)

Contact: UNICEF, the United Nation's Children's Fund, UNICEF House, Three United Nations Plaza, 44th Street, Between 1st and 2nd Avenues, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 326-7000 Fax: (212) 887-7465 Web Site: http://www.unicef.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, Infant mortality, International health, Neonatal mortality, Statistical data

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020. 2013. Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator webinar: Maternal, infant, and child health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020, 1 video (ca. 35 min.).

Annotation: This webinar discusses Healthy People 2020 indicators for maternal, infant, and child health; specifically lowering rates of infant mortality and preterm or premature birth.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prematurity, Preterm birth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.