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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. n.d.. Hearing loss fact sheet. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about hearing loss in children. It explains what hearing loss in children is; discusses some signs of hearing loss, what causes it, and whether it can be prevented; and what parents can do it they suspect that their child has hearing loss. The fact sheet is printed in English on one side and in Spanish on the other.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Heath services, Infant development, Infants, Prevention, Spanish language materials

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center and Maryland Department of Health, Office of Oral Health. 2015–. Maryland Mighty Tooth: School-based dental sealant training program. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center; Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health, Office of Oral Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This training program for school-based dental sealant program (SBSP) staff in Maryland pro- vides information about the history, operations, and underlying principles of SBSPs. Topics include guidelines for infection control in SBSPs, tooth selection and assessment for dental seal- ants, the sealant-application process, and program operations. Self-assessment quizzes are included.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) 735-2258 Fax: (410) 333-7392 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/oralhealth/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Curricula, Dental sealants, Maryland, Oral heath, Preventive health services, Program management, School age children, School health programs, State programs, Training

Genetic Alliance, Family Voices. 2013. Children and youth with special healthcare needs in Healthy People 2020: A consumer perspective. Washington, DC: Genetic Alliance; Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document examines Healthy People 2020 objectives and serves as a companion to Envision 2020, the 10-year strategic plan for the Division of Services for Children with Special Heath Needs in the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The document provides background; discusses trends in programs, legislation, and care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSCN); provides core performance measures for CYSCN; discusses who is at risk for chronic illnesses and disabilities; and offers information about preparing children and families for the future. Stories about individual children and families are included.

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special heath care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Families, Health services, Healthy People 2020: Children with special health care needs, High risk children, High risk infants, Infants with special health care needs, Legislation, Programs, Transition planning, Young adults

Flores G. 2012. Community health workers, promotores, and parent workers: Innovative, community-based approaches to improving the health and healthcare of children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 9 pp. (Big ideas: Children in the Southwest)

Annotation: This paper examines how community health workers (CHWs), promotores, and parent mentors can be used to improve the health of children in the Southwest, as well as the health care available to them. The paper provides definitions of CHWs, promotores, and parent mentors and discusses a conceptual framework for providing an understanding of how they can improve children's health and health care; evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness; existing programs; and implications for policy, practice, and research.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child abuse, Child health, Community health workers, Community heath services, Costs, Ethnic factors, Health services, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Income factors, Low income groups, Low income groups, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Southwestern United States, Uninsured persons

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, School Health Program. 2012. Nebraska school health guidelines = Guidelines for school health services in Nebraska. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services,

Annotation: This website, which presents guidelines for Nebraska schools, focuses on the activities and practices of school nurses and other non-nurse school personnel who provide health services. The site includes information about school health services; school nursing scope and standards; individualized health care plans; the role of the school nurse in special education; school health screening; emergency guidelines; guidelines related to methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in schools, athletics, and child care; and the Medication Aide Act.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Emergencies, Guidelines, Individualized health plans, Legislation, Nebraska, School health services, School heath, School nurses, School personnel, Screening, Special education, State programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. Ethical issues in interventions for childhood obesity. Preventing Chronic Disease: Public health research, practice, and policy 8(5):A91-A117,

Annotation: This journal issue includes articles that are related to ethical issues in interventions to prevent and control childhood obesity. Topics include protecting children from harmful food marketing, policy approaches, weight bias, children with special health care needs, public vs individual rights in childhood obesity interventions, the ethical basis for promoting nutritional health in public schools, ethical family interventions, state requirements and recommendations.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1545-1151.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Civil rights, Ethics, Families, Health promotion, Human rights, Intervention, Marketing, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Public policy, Research, School heath, Social bias

Schumacher R. 2011. State issues and innovations in creating integrated early learning and development systems: A follow-up to Early childhood 2010–Innovations for the next generation. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Education, 134 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to capture the spirit of and themes from the meeting, Early Childhood 2010: Innovations for the Next Generation, held in Washington, DC, in August 2010. The purpose of the meeting was to improve collaboration and partnership at the federal, state, and local levels in support of integrated state early learning and development systems for infants and children from birth through age 8. Topics include coordinated state leadership, effective use of data, systemic quality improvement, partnerships with families and communities, physical and behavioral health integration, and children with multiple risks.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. (SMA) 11-4661.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child development, Child heath, Collaboration, Communities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, High risk children, Infant development, Infant health, Leadership, Program coordination, Service coordination, Service delivery systems, Statistical data

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Work and family. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 2, Fall 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines a variety of work-family conflicts and assess their effects both on the well-being of American employees and their families and on the productivity of American employers. The authors also suggest approaches to help working parents meet the challenges of work-family conflict. The issue includes articles on the following topics: work and families; changing families, changing workplaces; policies to assist parents with young children; families with school-age children; children with health problems; families and elder care in the twenty-first century; workplace flexibility; the government's role in work-family conflict; and international perspectives on work-family policies.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-7-3.

Keywords: Children with special heath care needs, Employment, Families, Government role, Older adults, Public policy, School age children, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2010. Students with disabilities: More information and guidance could improve opportunities in physical education and athletics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report examines (1) what is known about the physical education (PE) opportunities that schools provide for students with disabilities and how schools provide these, (2) what is known about extracurricular athletic opportunities that schools provide for students with disabilities and how schools provide these, and (3) how the Department of Education assists states and schools in these areas. Recommendations for improving opportunities for students with disabilities in PE and athletics are offered.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special heath care needs, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, School age children, Schools, Sports

Donoghue EA, Kraft CA, eds. 2010. Managing chronic health needs in child care and schools: A quick reference guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 214 pp.

Annotation: This book is designed to serve as a quick reference that addresses a variety of common chronic health problems that children face. The first half of the book provides background on the services and systems that support the care of children with chronic medical conditions and special health care needs, discusses the treatment team, reviews different types of care plans and methods for implementing a care plan, and addresses new conditions and signs of concern. The second half of the book consists of condition-specific quick-reference sheets.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $45.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-299-4.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special heath care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health care, Health care systems, Health services, Treatment

Florida Department of Health. 2010. Florida's maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting needs assessment. [Tallahassee, FL]: Florida Department of Health, 238 pp.

Annotation: This 5-year needs assessment for Florida's maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program provides an overview of the impact of needs assessments, offers a statewide data report and discussion, and discusses defining communities in need, identifying Florida counties in need, quality and capacity of existing home visiting programs, Florida's substance abuse program, and a summary of the needs-assessment results.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399, Telephone: (850) 245-4147 Fax: (850) 487-4574 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Florida, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse prevention programs, Women's heath, Young children

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined and assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 18 in relation to the preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies, by building upon the evaluations of other entities and reviewing their findings, conclusions, and recommendations. The report includes findings, conclusions, and recommendations on the following topics: physical health, mental health, and trauma; child care; child welfare; elementary and secondary education; sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; transportation; juvenile justice; evacuation; and relevant activities in emergency management.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no. 10-M037; ISBN 978-1-58763-401-7.

Keywords: Adolescent heath, Adolescents, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Costs, Disaster planning, Education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Infants, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Transportation, Trauma

Concept Systems, Inc. 2010. A summit for action: The health of women and girls beyond 2010--Summary of discussion and recommendations. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Coordinating Committee on Women's Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report offers a summary of the July 2010 summit of government, academia, health services, consumers, research, and advocacy groups to identify opportunities and strategies to advance the status of the health of women and girls beyond 2010. Priorities in nine areas are discussed: eliminate access barrier; deliver prevention; mobilize knowledge for health; teach healthy lifestyle skills; promote wellness; marshal collective action; communicate informed policies; conduct, translate, and apply research; and integrate health systems and services. Additional topics include workforce, funding and resources, and health care reform.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Task forces, Conferences, Female children, Heath planning, Needs assessment, Strategic plans, Women, Women's health

Trahan L, Phillips K. 2009. Investing in maternal and child health: Strategies for state employers. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This presentation discusses the business case for investing in maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) and describes a model for improving MCAH through employer-sponsored benefits and health promotion programs. Contents include a description of a resource guide on MCAH plan design, education, and communication and related resources.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Child heath, Employer initiatives, Maternal health, Models, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, State programs, Work family issues

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American Academy of Pediatrics. 2009. 2009-2010 influenza season triage algorithm for children ([equal to or under] 18 years) with influenza-like illness. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This algorithm, which was developed for physicians and those under their direct supervision, offers information to help in providing advice to parents or other caregivers of ill children about seeking medical care for influenza-like illnesses. The algorithm provides information about what type of treatment should be sought based on the child's age, symptoms, and risk factors.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Infant heath, Infants with special health care needs, Influenza

Helm T, Rice G, Hein J. 2009. Yuma County needs assessment. [Tuscon, AZ]: University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Center for Rural Health, 68 pp.

Annotation: This document is a needs assessment for Yuma Country, Arizona. The document includes a summary of county characteristics (history and description, demographic indicators, marital status, economic indicators, and education) and discusses general health indicators, materal and perinatal health indicators, infant and child health indicators; Healthy People 2010; Title V block grant performance measures; and a survey of prenatal care in Yuma County.

Contact: University of Arizona, Center for Rural Health, 1295 N Martin - P.O. Box 245163, Tucson, AZ 85724, Telephone: (520) 626-5823 Fax: (520) 626-3101 E-mail: http://crh.arizona.edu/contact Web Site: http://www.crh.arizona.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Domestic violence, Economic factors, Education, Educational attainment, Health, Health care utilization, Health services, Healthy People 2010, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Marital status, Perinatal health, Prenatal care, Statistical data, Title V of the Social Security Act, Unemployment, lead poisoning, oral heath

American Academy of Pediatrics District II and New York State Task Force on Health Care for Children in Foster Care. 2005. Fostering health: Health care for children and adolescents in foster care. (2nd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 170 pp.

Annotation: This book defines standards of health care delivery and management that promote quality health care and wellness for children and adolescents with special health care needs who are in foster care. Topics include practice parameters for primary health care, developmental and mental health care, and child abuse and neglect; health care management; and chapters on medical consents, confidentiality, qualifications of health professionals, quality assessment and improvement, and financing. American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statements on foster care are provided as appendices.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special heath care needs, Foster care, Health care delivery, Health services management, Quality assurance, Standards

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.