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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (30 total).

Nicol P. n.d.. Coordinated Community-Based Services: [Final report]. Frankfort, KY: Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department for Health Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Human Resources, 39 pp.

Annotation: The principle aim of this project was to demonstrate a coordinated, community-based program model for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of children from birth to five years of age with developmental disabilities, children at risk for them, and for their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152932.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Developmental disorders, Early intervention, Family centered care, Interagency cooperation, community based care

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2015. Speech and language delay and disorders in children age 5 and younger: Screening. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Perry J, Kaufman B, Vasquez E. 2015. Strategic thinking report: LEND and DBP programs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from interviews and meetings with maternal and child (MCH) health program directors and other stakeholders about future directions for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) and Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) training programs. Contents include recommendations for strategic action in the following five areas: training pipelines for LEND and DBP programs; models of training and clinical care that are accessible and can be sustained; opportunities for trainees to learn and apply principles of MCH leadership training; collaboration with Title V and other partners; and policies and practices important to LEND and DBP programs, individuals with disabilities and their families, and the professionals who serve them. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development disorders, Collaboration, Developmental disabilities, Developmental pediatrics, Leadership, MCH training programs, Model programs, Pediatric neurology, Policy development, Strategic plans, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Environmental scan: State strategies and initiatives to improve developmental and autism screening and early identification systems. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides initial findings of a search of state and other documents related to developmental screening activities and of the Title V Information System online database to identify states with priority needs and performance measures related to developmental screening and early identification, with a focus on children with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities. It describes the Autism Cares Act and strategies to increase developmental screening and improve systems. It discusses issues of data collection, measurement, and infrastructure; coordinating systems and services; and challenges and barriers. State highlights are provided. An accompanying fact sheet lists state performance measures and objectives related to developmental screening and early identification.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism spectrum disorders, Child development disorders, Developmental screening, State programs

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Honigfeld L, Fenick A, Carvel KM, Vater S, Ward-Zimmerman B. 2012. Mid-level developmental and behavioral assessments: Between screening and evaluation. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 22 pp. (Impact)

Annotation: This report discusses the effectiveness of mid-level developmental assessment (MLDA) for children in Connecticut who are at risk for developmental or behavioral problems. MLDA is defined as the expedient assessment of a child with a behavioral or developmental health concerns identified through screening. The report provides information about three MLDA programs, discusses the results of MLDA, and provides considerations for building an MLDA system.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child development, Development disabilities, Developmental screening, High risk children, Service delivery systems

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2012. Autism: Caring for children with autism spectrum disorders—A resource toolkit (2nd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This digital toolkit assists clinicians in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) across the life span. It contains American Academy of Pediatrics autism clinical reports and policy statements and expert ASD screening, surveillance, diagnosis, treatment, and referral guidelines. Fact sheets are provided along with coding and billing guidance, and a webinar with video and slides for additional clinician use. Family handouts, in English and Spanish, that discuss diagnosis, transition, financial assistance for families, school inclusion, medical home, adolescents and sexuality, teaching social skills, and child wandering are included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $84.95 for AAP members, $94.95 for non-members; available as digital download only.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Autism, Child development disorders, Children, Communication disorders, Developmental disabilities, Diagnosis, Psychosexual development, Psychosocial development, Resources for professionals, Screening, Spanish language materials, Special health care needs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2010. The mental and emotional well-being of children: A portrait of states and the nation 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 60 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents a range of indicators on the health and well-being of children who have been diagnosed with emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions on the national level. For each state, the book shows the prevalence of seven conditions (grouped together) and the major demographic characteristics of children who have at least one of the conditions. The analyses delineate relationships among the conditions, children's socioeconomic characteristics, and access to health care. Technical appendices at the end of the book present information about the survey methodology, sample, and questions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00318.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Developmental disabilities, National surveys, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Kaye N, May J, Reuland CP. 2009. Measurement to support effective identification of children at risk for developmental delay. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 9 pp. (State health policy briefing)

Annotation: This brief examines the efforts of 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico to use measurement to support policy and practice changes that improve pediatric primary care health professionals' identification of children with or at risk for developmental delay. The brief discusses screening measurement approaches, additional evaluative activities, and how Michigan used measurement in policy and practice improvement.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child developmental disorders, Child health, High risk children, Michigan, Primary care, Public policy, Screening, State programs, Well child care

Kaye N, May J. 2009. Findings from the ABCD Screening Academy: State policy improvements that support effective identification of children at-risk for developmental delay . Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 9 pp. (Briefing)

Annotation: This brief presents policy improvements affecting screening in primary care that were identified by teams from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, who worked together for 14 months to make policy and practice improvements needed to make the use of validated screening tools in well child care a part of standard practice. The brief presents an overview of results, improving coverage (benefits and eligibility), reimbursement, improving program performance, and Oregon's approach to policy improvement.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child developmental disorders, Child health, Health supervision, High risk children, Oregon, Primary care, Public policy, Screening, State programs, Well child care

Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health. 2009. Translating science to policy: Protecting children's environmental health. New York, NY: Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health,

Annotation: This Web site provides information about the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health and WE ACT for Environmental Justice (WE ACT) conference, Translating Science to Policy: Protecting Children's Environmental Health, held on March 30, 2009, in New York, NY. The purpose of the conference was to review 10 years of research findings from the center and other scientists, discuss interventions stemming from this research, and identify strategies to advance policies that will reduce and prevent environmentally related diseases such as asthma, developmental disorders, and cancer in children living in urban communities. The Web site includes a video of the conference, as well as videos of specific parts of the conference; photographs; and conference materials.

Contact: Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, 722 West 168th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10032, Telephone: (212) 304-7280 E-mail: cccehcolumbia@gmail.com Web Site: http://ccceh.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Cancer, Child health, Conference proceedings, Developmental disorders, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental influences, Prevention, Public policy, Research

Zero to Three. 2005. DC: 0-3R: Diagnostic classification of mental health and developmental disorders of infancy and early childhood. (Rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 75 pp.

Annotation: This edition, for mental health and other professionals, draws on empirical research and clinical practice since the 1994 edition and provides updated material. Topics include recognizing mental health and developmental challenges in young children, understanding how relationships and environmental factors contribute to mental health and developmental disorders, using diagnostic criteria effectively for classification and interventions, and working more effectively with parents and other professionals to develop effective treatment plans. Classifications cover clinical disorders, relationships, medical and developmental disorders and conditions, psychosocial stressors, and emotional and social functioning. Appendices provide information on prioritizing diagnostic classification and planning intervention, a description of the process of revising DC:0-3, and a list of the task force members. References conclude the edition.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-943657-90-5.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Child development, Child development disorders, Child mental health, Developmental screening, Diagnosis, Early intervention services, Infant development, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Screening

Schor EL, ed. 2004. Caring for your school-age child: Ages 5 to 12. New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1 v.

Annotation: This book provides information parents need to take care of children between the ages of 5 and 12. It designed to help the parents prepare their children for the world outside of the home. The book includes 60 chapters organized in these parts: promoting health and normal development, nutrition and physical fitness, personal and social development, behavior and discipline, emotional problems and behavior disorder, family matters, children in school, chronic health problems, and common medical problems. The book treats topics into two ways: it includes chapters which provide background information to help the parents develop a context for the problems their children face, and it contains chapters targeted to particular problems which provide specific suggestions for dealing with them. This book is the second of a three-volume series developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Feeling Fine Programs.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $29.95 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Behavior, Behavior disorders, Child development, Child health, Child nutrition, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental stages, Discipline, Emotional development, Family relations, First aid, Parenting, Parenting skills, Physical fitness, Psychosocial development, School adjustment, School age children

Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. A holistic approach to health and safety. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 28 pp. (Technical assistance paper; no. 7)

Annotation: This report considers how Early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs can have a positive and lasting effect on the healthy growth and development of infants, toddlers, and their families. The report discusses systems that support health services and also touches upon the following issues: (1) health services for pregnant women, (2) oral health for infants and toddlers, (3) health screening for developmental, sensory, and behavioral concerns, (4) health care in rural communities, (5) Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs, (6) infant and child mental health, (7) children with special heath care needs, and (8) poverty and obesity. The report contains five appendices: (1) prenatal worksheet, (2) newborn health visit, (3) nursing control form, (4) health screening and immunization record, and (5) additional resources.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Child development, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Early Head Start, Families, Head Start, Health care systems, Health services, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Mental health, Migrant health programs, Obesity, Oral health, Poverty, Pregnant women, Rural communities, Sensory impairments, Young children

Wargo J, Wargo LE. 2002. The state of children's health and environment 2002: Common sense solutions for parents and policymakers. [Princeton, NJ]: Children's Health Environmental Coalition, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses trends in children's health and their exposure to mixtures of synthetic chemicals in air, water, food, soil, and consumer products, and the lack of government monitoring or regulation. Chapter topics include asthma and air quality; birth defects, developmental disabilities, and neurotoxic chemicals; childhood cancer and the environment; principles for legal reform; and a guide for parents and others. Numerous charts, tables, and graphs present statistical data on child health and environmental quality measures.

Contact: Healthy Child Healthy World, 12300 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 320, Los Angeles, CA 90025, Telephone: (310) 820-2030 Fax: (310) 820-2070 Web Site: http://www.healthychild.org $18.00, including shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Cancer, Chemicals, Child development disorders, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Government role, Regulation, Statistics

Furlong MJ, Smith DC, eds. 1993. Anger, hostility, and aggression: Assessment, prevention and intervention strategies for youth. Brandon, VT: Clinical Psychology Publishing Company, 516 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of recent research on the management of aggression in children and adolescents. Chapters focus on prevention programs and intervention strategies designed to help young people cope with the anger they experience without resorting to violence.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Case studies, Children, Cognitive disorders, Developmental disabilities, Emotions, Intervention, Mental health, Prevention programs, Research, School based programs, Socioeconomic factors, Treatment, Violence

Briggs HE, Koroloff NM, Richards K, Friesen BJ. 1993. Family advocacy organizations: Advances in support and system reform. Portland, OR: Portland State University, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 149 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the progress of 15 projects funded by the Child and Adolescent Service System Program (CASSP) to encourage the development of statewide, family controlled organizational structures for families caring for children with serious emotional disorders. The report tracks the activities, process, and outcomes of two major project goals over a two-year period: 1) to stimulate and support the development of model statewide family organizations; and 2) to evaluate the conceptualization, implementation and outcomes of family organizations. It includes case studies, a survey form, and results from a family member survey.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Available at no charge.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Child advocacy, Children with developmental disabilities, Families, Family centered services, Family support services, Parents

McDonald TP, Donner R, Gregoire T, Poertner J, Early T. 1993. Family caregiving for children with a serious emotional disability: Phase one technical report. Portland, OR: Portland State University, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 143 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors influencing the functioning of families with children having a serious emotional disability, describing which families are most vulnerable, identifying unmet service needs, and proposing responsive strategies. It is based on a survey of families with children with emotional disabilities. Potential audiences include parents, educators, researchers, and professionals working with children. A literature review on how families respond to a child's chronic illness or disability is included. The survey and findings are included in the appendix.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children with developmental disabilities, Families, Parents, Social workers, Special education

Friesen BJ, Schultze KH. 1992. Parent-professional collaboration content in professional education programs: A research report. Portland, OR: Portland State University, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report was prepared as part of a study of professional training curricula in schools of social work, psychiatric nursing, clinical psychology, special education, and child psychiatry to locate innovative course curricula and other materials designed to promote parent-professional partnerships on behalf of children with disabilities, and specifically on behalf of children who have serious emotional disorders. It is based on a survey of graduate schools made in 1986-87. The report contains descriptions of programs, courses, published material, and citations for related material provided by faculty. The names and addresses of respondents are provided.

Contact: Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (800) 547-8887 Secondary Telephone: (503) 725-3000 Fax: (503) 725-4882 Web Site: http://www.pdx.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children with developmental disabilities, Curricula, Parent participation, Professional education, Surveys

Poisson SS, DeGangi GA. 1991. Emotional and sensory processing problems: Assessment and treatment approaches for young children and their families. Rockville, MD: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 139 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to provide front-line health professionals and other child specialists with the knowledge and techniques necessary to detect early in life those children who display certain constitutional vulnerabilities and/or atypical emotional development. The manual presents various family-centered approaches for the screening and diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of children who have or are at risk for emotional and sensory processing problems and corresponding developmental delays. Three clinical intervention model programs are profiled: the Fussy Baby Clinic, the Parenting Psychotherapy Program, and the Therapeutic Nursery and Preschool Program. An optional videotape accompanies Chapter 3, dealing with the fussy baby. The last section of the manual is devoted to resources for families and professionals, including a list of computerized network centers that maintain and update information on training sessions and courses, parent support groups, and educational materials related to these issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 12301 Academy Way, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (301) 984-4444 Fax: (301) 881-8043 E-mail: info@louriecenter.org Web Site: http://www.louriecenter.org Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE046.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Assessment, Child health, Children, Developmental disabilities, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family centered services, Infants, Screening, Sensory impairments

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.