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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (1,679 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Larsen,B. n.d.. Symbolic logic: A promising decision making tool. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 25 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-8 (5))

U.S. Children's Bureau. n.d.. Your child from 4 to 6. (Draft) [four to six]. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 20 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This draft version of this brochure discusses the use of child care, how children this age are unusual, children's fear of losing their mother, nutrition, giving children tasks, same sex pals, sleep needs, learning by doing, meal time, children's relationship to their father, telling untrue tales, taking the child to the doctor, using shocking language, toys, asserting independence, and planning for another baby. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Pamphlets, Preschool children

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

Nicol P. n.d.. Coordinated Community-Based Services: [Final report]. Frankfort, KY: Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department for Health Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Human Resources, 39 pp.

Annotation: The principle aim of this project was to demonstrate a coordinated, community-based program model for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of children from birth to five years of age with developmental disabilities, children at risk for them, and for their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152932.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Developmental disorders, Early intervention, Family centered care, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Massachusetts Department of Public Health. n.d.. Your preschool child. [no place]: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet for parents describes care and safety for children age one year until entry into school. Topics include growth and development, building personality, discipline, prevention of disease and defects, prevention of accidents, proper nutrition, and daily child care. Additional topics include play and playthings, and care of the sick child. An index concludes the pamphlet.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Developmental stages, Disease prevention, Hygiene, Injury prevention, Nutrition

Academy of General Dentistry. n.d.. The life of a tooth: A visual timeline. Chicago, IL: Academy of General Dentistry, 1 v. (InfoBites)

Annotation: This timeline provides information on oral health and oral health care throughout life. Topics include developmental events, interaction with dentists, and oral hygiene.

Contact: Know Your Teeth, Academy of General Dentistry, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60611-6660, Telephone: (888) 243-3368, ext. 5300 Fax: (312) 440-0559 E-mail: info@knowyourteeth.com Web Site: http://knowyourteeth.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Consumer education materials, Dental care, Dental hygiene, Developmental stages, Infants, Oral health

Hansen KA, Kaufmann RK, Saifer S. n.d.. Education and the culture of democracy: Early childhood practice. Washington, DC: Children's Resources International, 132 pp. (Step by Step: A program for children and families)

Annotation: This book provides a framework for understanding the relationship between early childhood education and the capacity to function effectively in a democracy. It offers guidance, examples, methods, and language to help prepare young children to grow within the culture of democracy. Topics include education and democracy; the child-centered classroom; creating a plan for the child-centered classroom; equality; skills, talent, and creativity; encouragement of positive behavior; development of healthy habits; communication with other children, parents, and others; family and community involvement, and the transition to elementary school.

Keywords: Child behavior, Communication, Communities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Elementary school children, Families, Parents, Preschool children, Young children

Snow C, Selman RL, Walker PC. n.d.. Voices reading: Literacy to live by—A comprehensive reading and character development program for grades K-2. Columbus, OH: Zaner-Bloser, 72 pp. (Program overview)

Annotation: This book presents the Voices Reading program, which combines systematic, comprehensive literacy instruction with character development. The program uses multicultural trade books as its basis and leveled books to match individual needs. The program addresses six themes: identity awareness, perspective taking, conflict resolution, social awareness, love and friendship, and freedom and democracy. In addition to explaining these themes, the book presents program components and a literacy overview, addresses the achievement gap, and discusses research and methods and scope and sequence.

Contact: Zaner-Bloser, 1201 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH 43215-3018, Telephone: (800) 421-3018 Secondary Telephone: (614) 486-0221 Web Site: http://zaner-bloser.com

Keywords: Character, Child development, Cultural competence, Educational attainment, Literacy education, Programs, Reading, Research

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. n.d.. Hearing loss fact sheet. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about hearing loss in children. It explains what hearing loss in children is; discusses some signs of hearing loss, what causes it, and whether it can be prevented; and what parents can do it they suspect that their child has hearing loss. The fact sheet is printed in English on one side and in Spanish on the other.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Heath services, Infant development, Infants, Prevention, Spanish language materials

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine. n.d.. Project Smile. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4 modules.

Annotation: This training course for physicians comprises course instruction that includes a brief self-assessment and four modules on early childhood oral health. Module 1 defines early childhood caries (ECC) and discusses ECC prevalence, risk factors, and causes. Module 2 discusses the tooth-eruption sequence, the first oral examination, the benefits of early examinations, and the knee-to-knee oral examination. Module 3 describes the dental caries sequence, white spots, caries severity, and unusual problems. Module 4 addresses culturally sensitive care, ways to prevent ECC, anticipatory guidance, and toothbrushing technique.

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, Mail Code 7794, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, Telephone: (210) 567-4550 Contact Phone: (210) 567-0815 Fax: (210) 567-4579 Contact E-mail: presleyt@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://familymed.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Dentists, Early childhood caries, Family physicians, Oral health, Professional development, Training materials, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Mom! Dad! Ask the doctor about my emotional development, too!. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 12 items.

Annotation: These advertising materials promote the importance of mental health as part of a health supervision visit. They are designed to be displayed on a bulletin board or used as a table top display in a pediatric practice. One version focuses on young children and the other on teenagers. Both versions are available in English and Spanish. Other versions are provided for use on Facebook pages or in parent newsletters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Pediatric care, Public awareness materials, Social interaction

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

Singleton M, Atukpawu-Tipton G, Joraanstad A. 2022. Advancing equity in home visiting. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates, 9 pp. (National Home Visiting Resource Center innovation roundup brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes several initiatives to advance health and/or racial equity in home visiting. Some examples include: Home Visiting Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network 2.0 (HV CoIIN 2.0) Health Equity Collaborative, Michigan Home Visiting Initiative (MHV), and Massachusetts Racial Equity Movement. The brief also highlights the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health (NLAPH) program.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Ethnic groups, Family support services, Health equity, Home visiting, Model programs, Race, Social factors

National Home Visiting Resource Center. 2022. 2022 home visiting yearbook. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, multiple items

Annotation: This yearbook presents 2021 data on early childhood home visiting and provides an up-to-date look at home visiting in action. The report answers critical questions about where home visiting programs are located; the number of families and children being served by home visiting programs; home visiting models; the staffing of home visiting programs; and what is happening in the states. The yearbook includes data on virtual home visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. The National Home Visiting Resource Center uses model, state, and administrative data sources, along with publicly available information, to present the national home visiting landscape.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting, Maternal health

Ferguson D, Smith S, Granja M, Lasala O, Cooper H. 2022. Child Welfare and Early Intervention: Policies and Practices to Promote Collaboration and Help Infants and Toddlers Thrive. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty , 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines promising strategies used in three states (Texas, Colorado, and Rhode Island) to address the developmental and mental health needs of infants and toddlers involved in Child Welfare (CW). The brief focuses primarily on the roles of state and local CW and Part C of the federal Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that establishes requirements for providing Early Intervention (EI) services to infants and toddlers with disabilities. Additional support from other sectors and settings (e.g., mental health and home visiting) are also highlighted.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Early intervention, Ethnic groups, Infants, Low income groups, Mental health, Model programs , Poverty, State programs, Toddlers

Public Counsel. 2022. Examining racial and ethnic inequities among children served under California's developmental services system: Where things currently stand . Los Angeles, CA: Public Counsel , 43 pp.

Annotation: This report examines racial and ethnic inequities in children's access to developmental services through California's Department of Developmental Services (DDS). It quantifies and evaluates inequities in service access and expenditures and examines the effectiveness of the set of measures developed by DDS to monitor and prevent inequities related to race, culture, and primary language spoken. A summary of findings is provided along with recommendations for legislative improvements that could help eliminate disparities to services for children with developmental disabilities in the state of California.

Contact: Public Counsel , 610 South Ardmore Avenue , Los Angeles, CA 90005, Telephone: (213) 385-2977 Fax: (213) 385-9089 Web Site: https://publiccounsel.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, California, Children with developmental disabilities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Racial factors, State legislation

Children's Defense Fund. 2021. The state of America's children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, irregular.

Annotation: This series of reports is a compilation and analysis of national and U.S. state-by-state data on child population, child poverty, family structure, family income, housing and homelessness, hunger and nutrition, health, early childhood, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. Changes in key child and national well-being indicators are included.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Ethnic groups, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Statistics, Trends

Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission. 2021. Report to the Congress on Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, 246 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on aspects of Medicaid's mission to ensure access to high-quality health services and the program's future as a major health care payer driving health system change toward value. The report focuses on topics of interest to Congress, including Medicaid’s responsiveness during economic downturns; concerns about high rates of maternal morbidity and mortality; improving hospital payment policy for the nation's safetynet hospitals, and the integration of care for people who are dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare.

Contact: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, 1800 M Street, N.W., Suite 360 South, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 350-2000 Fax: (202) 273-2452 E-mail: macpac@macpac.gov Web Site: http://www.macpac.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Costs, Financing, Health care reform, Health services delivery, Medicaid, Medications, Mental health, Oral health, Organizational change, Pregnant women, Reimbursement, Systems development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.