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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (72 total).

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child, Adult, and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: Information for school personnel (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is meant to serve as a resource for school nurses and other school personnel to alert them to the signs and symptoms of complications of the sickle cell diseases and to educate them about what to do if they encounter a child with such signs and symptoms. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) what is sickle cell disease?, (3) warning signs, (4) what is sickle cell trait? (5) complications related to sickle cell disease, (6) medical management, (7) psychosocial issues, (8) the teacher, and (9) the social workers. The guide also includes the following appendices: (1) glossary, (2) bibliography, (3) New Jersey sickle cell/hemoglobinopathies treatment centers, and (4) New Jersey genetic centers for testing and family counseling.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic services, New Jersey, Patient care management, Psychosocial factors, School health services, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait, Social workers, Teachers

Minnesota Sudden Infant Death Center. n.d.. SIDS and the child care provider. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Sudden Infant Death Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides guidelines to help reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in child care settings. It provides an overview of SIDS; a description of safe sleep practices for infants; and the rules that apply in the state of Minnesota when a death occurs in a child care setting. The brochure also describes sources of support and services that are available to providers who have lost an infant due to SIDS.

Contact: Minnesota Sudden Infant Death Center, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Avenue South; MS-50-2165, Minneapolis, MN 55404, Telephone: (612) 813-6285 Secondary Telephone: (800) 72-3812 Fax: (612) 813-7344 Web Site: http://www.childrensmn.org/patientfamily/family-services-a-resources/sid-center/the-minnesota-sudden-infant-death-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Infants, Minnesota, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, State legislation

Allen L, Kelly BB, ed; Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success. 2015. Transforming the workforce for children birth to age 8: A unifying foundation. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; National Research Council, 706 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. It also examines the current capacities and practices of the work force, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government agencies and other funders who support and oversee these systems. Contents include recommendations to improve the quality of professional practice and the practice environment for care and education professionals. These detailed recommendations create a blueprint for action that builds on a unifying foundation of child development and early learning, shared knowledge and competencies for care and education professionals, and principles for effective professional learning.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-32485-4 .

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child development, Competence, Competency based education, Early childhood education, Financing, Infants, Learning, Paraprofessional personnel, Program development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research, Teachers, Toddlers, Training, Work force, Young children

Palfrey JS, Ogilus N, Rosen-Reynoso M. 2014. Community health workers and children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an environmental scan to identify programs that are engaging community health workers (CHWs) and/or community outreach strategies to enhance services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) from Latino families. The report describes disparities in access to and quality of health services for CSHCN of Latino backgrounds, interventions to decrease racial and ethnic disparities, CHW deployment, and what CHWs can accomplish. Additional contents include the methodology and criteria for the scan, descriptions of exemplary programs, and a discussion of principles and opportunities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the HSC Foundation]

Contact: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, c/o Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA 02125, Telephone: (617) 287-4370 E-mail: communitybasedsrvcs@umb.edu Web Site: http://communitybasedservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children with special health care needs, Community health services, Community health workers, Competence, HIspanic Americans, Medical home, Model programs, Quality assurance, Sociocultural factors

National Center for Farmworker Health. 2013. Oral health. Buda, TX: National Center for Farmworker Health, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents findings from an analysis of migrant health center data on oral health services received, visits for oral health services, and barriers to achieving optimal oral health among agricultural worker clients. Contents include general information about oral health and disease and epidemiology and disparities, and agricultural worker-specific risk factors and barriers to care. Topics include lack of dental insurance, long travel times to dental care, linguistic barriers, and shortages of oral health care providers.

Contact: National Center for Farmworker Health, 1770 FM 967, Buda, TX 78610, Telephone: (512) 312-2700 Fax: (512) 312-2600 E-mail: info@ncfh.org Web Site: http://www.ncfh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Barriers, Children, Dental care, Ethnic groups, Farm workers, Migrant health programs, Oral health, Risk factors, Rural population, Statistics

U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2013. Nutrition and wellness tips for young children: Provider handbook for the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture,

Annotation: This handbook is designed to help Child and Adult Care Food Program providers create healthier environments for the children in their care. It provides tip sheets for addressing wellness recommendations from federal dietary guidelines and health and safety standards on nutrition, active play, and limiting screen time that describe what programs should do and gives suggested activities. Also included are best practices, promotional materials about the handbook, and additional resources. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250, Telephone: (202) 720-2791 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care workers, Guidelines, Model programs, Nutrition, Physical activity, Technical assistance, Young children

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health and Frank Porter Graham Chid Development Institute. 2013. National Training Institute (NTI) for Child Care Health Consultants . Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, multiple items.

Annotation: This website comprises materials developed by the Healthy Child Care America train-the-trainer program to address the needs of child care health consultants. Contents include modules and toolkits on topics such as consulting, curriculum development, caring for children who are ill, child maltreatment, children with special health needs, environmental health (including lead), the field of child care, infectious disease, injury prevention, mental health, nutrition and physical activity, oral health, quality in child care, and staff health. Evaluation forms, templates, and a training checklist are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child maltreatment, Children with special health care needs, Communicable diseases, Curriculum development, Environmental health, Infections, Injury prevention, Lead, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Out of home care, Physical activity, Qualitative evaluation, Training

Flores G. 2012. Community health workers, promotores, and parent workers: Innovative, community-based approaches to improving the health and healthcare of children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 9 pp. (Big ideas: Children in the Southwest)

Annotation: This paper examines how community health workers (CHWs), promotores, and parent mentors can be used to improve the health of children in the Southwest, as well as the health care available to them. The paper provides definitions of CHWs, promotores, and parent mentors and discusses a conceptual framework for providing an understanding of how they can improve children's health and health care; evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness; existing programs; and implications for policy, practice, and research.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child abuse, Child health, Community health workers, Community heath services, Costs, Ethnic factors, Health services, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Income factors, Low income groups, Low income groups, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Southwestern United States, Uninsured persons

Kreutzer C, Hirschorn N, Stack W, Maki M, Raad M. 2011. Epilepsy and seizure disorder: A resource guide for parents [2nd ed.]. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children's Hospital, 38 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist parents and caregivers of children with epilepsy and seizure disorder in keeping health information and their child's health records in a central location. The guide provides answers to questions to help parents better understand epilepsy and seizure disorder; learn about access to care and services; reach out to other parents; and learn about additional resources. The appendixes include forms to help parents keep a log of their child's diagnosis, seizures, visits to the doctor and medications taken, and communication with health professionals and organizations. The guide is available in English, Spanish, and Farsi. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Southern California University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 46550 Sunset Boulevard, Mailstop #53, Los Angeles, CA 90027-0980, Telephone: (323) 361-2300 Secondary Telephone: (323) 480-4192 Fax: (323) 361-8305 E-mail: uscucedd@chla.usc.edu Web Site: http://www.uscucedd.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Consumer education materials, Epilepsy, Forms, Medical records, Non English language materials, Parents, Seizures, Spanish language materials, child care workers

Anoka County, MN, Department of Community Social Services and Mental Health. 2011. SIDS packet: SIDS training checklist for substitutes and helpers. Anoka, MN: Anoka County, 23 pp.

Annotation: This packet contains training materials for substitutes, helpers, and household members who may assist with the care of an infant. It contains a training checklist of items for the trainee to review, and fact sheet or brochures on SIDS and the child care provider, facts about SIDS, strategies for lowering the risk of SIDS, tummy time, infant care supervision, product safety alerts, CPR, response plan for a medical emergency, dealing with the grief of children, and a post-test with answers.

Contact: Anoka County, MN, Anoka, MN Web Site: http://www.co.anoka.mn.us/index.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care workers, Prevention, SIDS, Training

Schumacher R. 2010. Charting progress for babies in child care: Promote health and safety. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document presents research supporting a recommendation from CLASP (the Center for Law and Social Policy) on how states can support the health and safety of babies and toddlers (birth to age 3) in childcare settings. Included are answers to the following questions: (1) what does the research say about ensuring the health and safety of babies and toddlers in child care? and (2) how can state child care licensing, subsidy, and quality enhancement policies ensure the health and safety of babies and toddlers? Links to related materials include examples from states; online resources for state policy makers; and ideas for how state child care licensing, subsidy, and quality enhancement policies can move toward CLASP's recommendation.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Licensing, Policy development, Research, Standards, State initiatives, Toddlers, Training

Gabor V, Mantinan K, Rudolph K, Morgan R, Longjohn M. 2010. Challenges and opportunities related to implementation of child care nutrition and physical activity policies in Delaware: Findings from focus groups with child care providers and parents. Washington, DC: Altarum Institute, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the findings and recommendations offered following the conclusion of a focus group study with child care center directors, child care home providers, and parents of children in child care centers across the state of Delaware. The purposes of the study, conducted in partnership with Nemours Health and Prevention Services and Delaware's Office of Child care Licensing and Child and Adult Care Food Program, were (1) to learn how child care providers and parents are responding to Delaware’s comprehensive nutrition and physical activity standards for child care facilities and (2) to understand what child care providers need to do to achieve compliance with nutrition and physical activity standards and to develop a set of recommendations to address these needs. Included in the report are a list of the questions presented to focus group participants; a summary of the focus group study findings; and recommendations related to the state guidelines and their implementation by child care providers.

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Child care workers, Delaware, Focus groups, Guideline adherence, Licensing, Program improvement, Recommendations, Standards, State programs, Studies

Aronson S, Donoghue E, Shope T, eds. 2010. Curriculum for managing infectious diseases in early education and child care settings. Chicago, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, (Healthy Futures)

Annotation: This curriculum comprises an instructor's manual and a participant's manual on understanding, preventing, recognizing, and managing infectious diseases in early education and child care settings. The curriculum is designed as an educational tool for early childhood educators and child care workers with all levels of understanding about infectious diseases. Each manual is divided into three modules and includes PowerPoint presentations, video clips, activities, forms, and pre- and post-tests, and other resources. Tips for presenting and instructions for downloading and saving files for presenting without internet access are available from the website.

Contact: Healthy Child Care America, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (888) 227-5409 Fax: (847) 228-7320 E-mail: childcare@aap.org Web Site: http://www.healthychildcare.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care workers, Child health, Curricula, Disease prevention, Early childhood educators, Infectious diseases, Resources for professionals

Allard LT, Hunter A. 2010. Understanding temperament in infants and toddlers. Nashville, TN: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning, (What works brief series, issue 23)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is geared toward caregivers of young children and families with young children, provides information about temperament in young children. It explains what temperament is; lists different types of temperament; and discusses why temperament is important, developing goodness of fit, and using knowledge about temperament to promote positive social-emotional development and behavior. A case study involving one child and her adjustment to a new home child care environment is included. A handout that care providers can use to understand their own temperament and that of the children in their care is also available.

Contact: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning , Vanderbilt University, Box 328 GPC, Nashville, TN 37203, Telephone: (615) 322-3978 Secondary Telephone: (866) 433-1966 Fax: (615) 343-1570 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child care, Child care workers, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Temperament, Young children

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Health. 2009. Growing healthy smiles in the child care setting: Implementing a tooth brushing program to promote oral health and prevent tooth decay. [Boston, MA]: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Health, 14 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help child care providers in Massachusetts comply with a regulation to assist children with toothbrushing. It reviews the causes of tooth decay, risk factors, and prevention strategies; discusses the importance of toothbrushing and provides tips on safely implementing a toothbrushing program; and offers resources on other toothbrushing programs and oral health teaching tools and lessons for young children. [Note: Contains dated information on using fluoridated toothpaste.]

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Health, 250 Washington Street, 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-6060 Secondary Telephone: (617) 624-5992 Fax: (617) 624-6062 Web Site: https://www.mass.gov/orgs/office-of-oral-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care workers, Dental hygiene, Health policy, Massachusetts, Oral health, Prevention programs, Regulations, State legislation, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2009. Medication administration in early education and child care settings. Elk Grove, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2 v.

Annotation: This curriculum provides information about medication administration for early education and child care professionals. Contents include an instructor's manual and a participant's manual. The curriculum is divided into 5 modules and includes presentations, video clips, activities, forms, and pre- and post-tests. Topics include forms of medication; preparation and medication storage; how to administer oral medication, topical medication, eye drops, and ear drops; documentation; and problem solving, The curriculum is estimated to take 4 hours to present, however, it can be adapted to meet time constraints and learner and instructor needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Child care workers, Child safety, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Medications

Hooker C, Holt E, Nissen G. 2008. Infectious diseases in childcare settings and schools: Information for directors, caregivers, parents or guardians, and school health staff (6th ed.). Hopkins, MN: Hennepin County Community Human Services and Public Health Department, 1 v.

Annotation: This manual is intended to inform administrators, child care providers, caregivers, parents and guardians, and school health staff about specific infectious disease problems they may encounter in the child care setting or in schools. The manual provides specific disease prevention and control guidelines that are consistent with the national standards put forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Public Health Association on 52 diseases that are of concern in child care settings and on 25 diseases that are of concern in schools. Section contents include guidelines for staff and children and the environment, misuse of antibiotics, disease reporting, exposure control and outbreak management, fact sheets, sample letter to healthcare providers or parents and guardians, immunizations, Minnesota laws related to childcare settings, a glossary, references, order forms, and fact sheets for school-aged children.

Contact: Hennepin County Health, Housing & Social Services, Epidemiology & Environmental Health, Hopkins Wells Fargo Buildng, 1011 S First Street, Suite 215, Hopkins, MN 55343, Telephone: (612) 348-2741 E-mail: Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child health, Communicable diseases, Disease transmission, Minnesota, Parents, Prevention, School age children, School health, School personnel, Standards, Young children

Rosenbaum S. 2008. Medicaid portability in the context of oral health care for Head Start-enrolled children in migrant farmworker families. Washington, DC: George Washington University, School of Public Health and Health Services, 10 pp.

Annotation: This analysis examines opportunities and challenges in addressing Medicaid eligibility and enrollment for children of migrant and seasonal farmworkers. It examines Medicaid portability, that is, the ability of Medicaid to follow children from one state to another. The analysis presents an overview of Medicaid eligibility and enrollment and approaches to increasing Medicaid enrollment and portability for children in Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs, using Head Start programs as a mechanism for identifying and enrolling children in Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health services, Eligibility determination, Enrollment, Farm workers, Head Start, Medicaid, Migrant health programs, Migrants, Oral health, Young children

Healthy Child Care America, American Academy of Pediatrics and First Candle/SIDS Alliance. 2008. Reducing the risk of SIDS in child care (rev. ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: Healthy Child Care America, 74 pp.

Annotation: This training guide is designed to help child care providers protect the children in their care by creating a safer sleep environment to prevent SIDS. The training includes PowerPoint slides and notes. The following topics are discussed: SIDS, sleep position, reducing risk, risk factors, beliefs and misconceptions, tummy time, safe sleep practices, bed sharing, safe sleep environments, safe sleep policies, legal considerations, parents' concerns, emergencies, what to expect if an infant dies, and resources.

Contact: Healthy Child Care America, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (888) 227-5409 Fax: (847) 228-7320 E-mail: childcare@aap.org Web Site: http://www.healthychildcare.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Emergencies, Infant mortality, Infant safety, Parents, Prevention, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep position, Training materials

Wisconsin Child Care Information Center. [2007]. Think big, start small: Together - children grow—Quality child care for children with special needs. [Madison, WI]: Wisconsin Child Care Information Center, 28 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers information about providing high-quality child care for children with special health care needs. Information is included about parents' and providers' concerns, what parents and providers need to know to get started, suggestions for talking to parents and providers, how to get child care off to a good start, strategies for success, resources, and what to do when a child care provider refuses to care for a child with a disability. Questions and answers about topics including the American with Disabilities Act are presented.

Contact: Wisconsin Child Care Information Center, Department of Public Instruction, PO Box 7841, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 224-5388 Secondary Telephone: (800) 362-7353 E-mail: ccic@dpi.state.wi.us Web Site: http://ccic.dcf.wi.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Disabilities, Legislation, Parents

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.