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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Partnership for People with Disabilities, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia Department of Social Services, Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. 2014. Tipping the scales in their favor: Your role in recognizing and responding to abuse and neglect of children with disabilities. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University, 1 p.

Annotation: This document describes a three-session multidisciplinary course for family members of children with disabilities and the professionals who support them about preventing abuse and neglect of children with disabilities. Topics include how widespread abuse and neglect of children with disabilities is, why children with disabilities are at greater risk of abuse and neglect, why it is difficult to identify abuse and neglect in children with disabilities, and roles in identifying and reporting abuse and neglect of children with disabilities.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, Harrisonburg, VA , Telephone: (540) 568-5251 Fax: (540) 568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconsortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Families, Infants, Injury prevention, Interdisciplinary approach, Multidisciplinary teams, Special health care needs, Training, Violence prevention

Dreisbach N. 2013. Responding to adverse childhood experiences. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 4 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief focuses on young children and early traumatic stressors, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE), to further understand the pathway leading to heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory diseases as leading causes of death in the United States. It outlines types of ACEs, a framework for research, and the role of health philanthropy in mitigating childhood adversity in selected examples in several states.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Maltreated children, Mortality, Trauma, Young children

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2012. The risk and prevention of maltreatment of children with disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 19 pp. (Bulletin for professionals)

Annotation: This report about child abuse and neglect as it relates to children with disabilities describes the scope of the problem, risk factors, and strategies for prevention. It examines the problem in terms of statistics and research and provides tips to help identify and assess abuse and neglect and respond collaboratively; and locate training resources.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, High risk groups, Prevention, Research, Resource materials, Risk factors, Statistical data, Training

Urbain E. 1991 (ca.). Parent Outreach Project [Final report]. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Foundation, 38 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to develop and demonstrate a replicable, collaborative, interagency prevention intervention model using existing professional casework services, community education, and community-based social support for a population at risk for potential child maltreatment. Important components of the project included home visits by nurses and volunteers. Public health nurses conducted assessments in the home and monitored the developmental progress of the child, while a volunteer "parent befriender" offered support and helped build the parent's self-esteem and strengthened parent-child relationships. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146272.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Counseling for Parents, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Intervention, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents

Bardfield S, Beck-Black R, Berman-Rossi T, Breitner W, Johnson D, McGowan B, Seitzman B, Shulman L, Woodrow R, Young AT, eds. 1991. Social work practice with maternal and child health populations at risk: A casebook. [New York, NY]: Columbia University School of Social Work, 274 pp.

Annotation: This casebook discusses social work in the areas of adolescent health and pregnancy, families with AIDS, homelessness, children and adolescents with chronic illnesses and disabilities, and child abuse and neglect. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Case studies, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children with developmental disabilities, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Homelessness, Social work

Kotch J. 1989. Stress, Social Support, and Abuse and Neglect in High-Risk Infants [Final report]. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 48 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to test the ecological model of abuse and neglect in a cohort of infants judged to be at risk for maltreatment. The investigators tested the role of stress in precipitating a report of abuse or neglect, the role of social support in modifying the risk, and the interaction of stress and social support. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB89-230767.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Families

Hurt M. [1974]. Child abuse and neglect: A report on the status of the research. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 63 pp.

Annotation: This report on the status of research on child abuse and neglect is to provide preliminary information which will assist the newly established National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. The contents describe characteristics of abuse and neglect, parents, children, the situation, effects and effects of abuse. Reporting, recording, and diagnosis of abuse is discussed. Remediation with families, preventive programs, and remedial programs are also addressed. The text of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act is presented in Appendix A. An annotated bibliography is included.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, Child abuse, Child neglect, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, Research

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.