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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (395 total).

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

Stuemky J. n.d.. Developing and Improving the Capacity of Existing Pediatric Emergency Medical Services in Oklahoma [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: University of Oklahoma,

Annotation: The State of Oklahoma has a limited and fragmented EMS system that has not adequately addressed the needs of its pediatric population. To decrease the negative outcomes of pediatric emergency care, this project: (1) Established a prehospital- and hospital-based data collection system to provide definition of emergency medical services for children (EMSC) and identify negative outcome factors; (2) developed and assisted a statewide consortium in support of EMSC issues; (3) provided pediatric prehospital and hospital care training to emergency medical technicians, nurses, and physicians; and (4) worked with Native Americas and Hispanic populations to prevent child abuse and related injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Abuse, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Shaken Infant Syndrome

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Center for Mental Health Services, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2022. National guidelines for child and youth behavioral health crisis care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services, 64 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines offer best practices, implementation strategies, and practical guidance for the design and development of services that meet the needs of children, youth, and their families experiencing a mental health crisis. The document provides strategies for different populations,, including young children, transition-age youth and young adults, youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities, LGBTQI+ youth, and rural and frontier communities. Each section includes a summary of implementation strategies, as well as links to programs and additional information. An appendix provides a table of core crisis principles.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Families, Federal programs, Mental health, Mental health services, Substance abuse treatment, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2020. Primary prevention: Themes from fiscal year 2018 grantee site visits. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 10 pp. (Children's Bureau grantee synthesis)

Annotation: This Grantee Lessons Learned brief highlights common themes and unique examples gathered by grantees during Children's Bureau-led site visits to other jurisdictions with promising approaches to community-based primary prevention.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child welfare, Evidence based programs, Maltreated children, Model programs, Primary prevention

O'Connor E, Thomas R, Robalino S, Senger CA, Perdue LA, Patnode C. 2020. Interventions to prevent illicit and nonmedical drug use in children, adolescents, and young adults: Updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 221 pp. (Evidence synthesis; no. 190; AHRQ publication; no. 19-05258-EF-1)

Annotation: This systematic review examined the benefits and harms of primary care-relevant interventions to prevent illicit and nonmedical drug use in children, adolescents, and young adults to inform the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Data sources included MEDLINE, PubMED, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; in addition, references of relevant publications and government web sites were also searched. The review identified 29 trials that met inclusion criteria; 26 of the trials were general prevention trials that focused on nonpregnant youth covering the ages 10 through 24 years. The review found low strength of evidence on the benefits of behavioral counseling interventions to prevent illicit and nonmedical substance use in young people.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Child health, Drug abuse, Drug addiction, Families, Interventions, Literature reviews, Prevention, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention

Selph S, Patnode CD, Bailey SR, Pappas M, Stoner R, Hart E, Chou R. 2020. Primary care interventions for prevention and cessation of tobacco use in children and adolescents: A systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 100 pp. (Evidence synthesis; no. 185; AHRQ publication; no. 19-05254-EF-1)

Annotation: This report systematically updates the 2013 United States Preventive Services Task Force review on primary care relevant interventions for tobacco use prevention and cessation in children and adolescents. Data sources included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE, with searches conducted for literature published between September 1, 2012, to June 25, 2019, with additional surveillance of relevant literature through February 7, 2020. The review concluded that behavioral interventions can reduce the likelihood of smoking initiation in nonsmoking youth and young adults. Further research is needed to identify effective interventions for youth who already smoke or use other tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Adverse effects, Child health, Children, Disease prevention, Interventions, Literature reviews, Nicotine, Prevention, Risk factors, Smoking, Substance abuse, Substance use behavior, Tobacco

U.S. Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway, and FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. (2019?). 2019/2020 prevention resource guide. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 106 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help individuals and organizations in every community strengthen families and prevent child abuse and neglect. Topics include strengthening individuals, families and communities; working with families using the protective factors; using protective factors as a framework for a community partnership; protecting children from abuse and maltreatment; tip sheets for parents and caregivers; and resources. The tip sheets are presented in English and Spanish.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child welfare, Community participation, Families, Maltreated children, Materials for consumers, Primary prevention, Spanish language materials

Johnson J, Wright FD. 2019. Child maltreatment: The role of the dental professional. Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include defining the problem, the dentist's role in intervention, presenting problems that suggest child maltreatment, assessment and documentation, reporting, treatment for orofacial or dental trauma, and what oral health professionals can do to reduce child maltreatment.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Trauma

Barzel R, Holt K. 2019. Opioids and children and adolescents: Information for oral health professionals. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on opioids for oral health professionals. It includes information about assessing children and adolescents, drugs to recommend before prescribing opioids, prescribing opioids with caution and being aware of the potential for misuse or abuse, and understanding laws, policies, and recommendations. The document also discusses providing post-operative instructions and creating a safe, friendly environment. Information about prescription-drug-monitoring programs and managing acute oral pain are included, along with tips for dentists to share with parents and an overview of research. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Drug abuse, Narcotics, Oral health, Pain, Prescription drugs, Prevention

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2019. Intensive care coordination for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders: State and community profiles. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 435 pp.

Annotation: This document updates a 2014 profiles report, by (1) categorizing states' intensive care coordination (ICC) efforts into sustainability, implementation or pre-implementation groups; (2) identifying key informants; and (3) expanding the questionnaire template used in surveying the states. This updated profiles report is intended to assist states interested in improving outcomes for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders by developing or revamping ICC. includes lessons learned from 40 states and a small number of local jurisdictions that have implemented ICC, with and without high quality Wraparound, and is intended to support innovation around state efforts.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: PEP19-04-01-001..

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Mental disorders, Mental health services, Service coordination, State programs, Substance abuse, Youth

Hunt T, Lee H, Slack KS. 2018. Adverse childhood experiences in Wisconsin: Findings from the 20101-2013 Behavioral Risk Factors Survey. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Children’s Trust Fund and Child Abuse Prevention Fund of Children’s Hospital & Health System., 36 pp.

Annotation: This PowerPoint updates findings from previous publications on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) from the Wisconsin Behavioral Risk Factors Survey. Topics include the prevalence of ACEs, co-occurence of ACEs, mental health outcomes, health risk behaviors, physical health outcomes, socioeconomic status, health care access and Medicaid enrollment, and quality of life, followed by policy recommendations. The 2010 report includes vignettes from adults who experienced ACEs and who describe the impact those experiences have had on their lives.

Keywords: State surveys, Access to health care Medicaid, Child abuse, Child health, Children, Health behavior, Health policy, Mental health, Physical health, Risk factors, Wisconsin

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2016. Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document provides the statutory basis for identifying persons who are required to report child maltreatment under certain circumstances for all of the United States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Lists include a description of the person required to report maltreatment, standards for making a report, privileged communications, and inclusion or other disclosure of the reporter’s identity.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children, Legal definitions, Legal responsibility, Legislation, Maltreated children, Oral health, Standards

Georgia State University School of Public Health. 2016. SafeCare curriculum. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University School of Public Health, 4 items.

Annotation: This resource provides materials for the SafeCare, an evidence-based, parent-training curriculum for parents of infants and children from birth to age 5 who are at-risk for or have been reported for child neglect or physical abuse. Topics include the evidence-base, cost-benefit, cost of implementation of SafeCare; the structure of the parent child/infant interaction, health, home safety, and family engagement skills modules; certification and support including the role of the home visitor, coach, and trainer; and implementation planning and sustainability. Curricula are available for providers (in English and Spanish), coaches, and trainers.

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, 14 Marietta Street, N.W., Suite 100, Atlanta, GA 30303, Web Site: http://healthy.gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Curricula, Early childhood development, Home visiting, Infants, Model programs, Motivation, Parent child relations, Parent education, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Program planning, Safety, Sustainability, Training, Young children

Children's Safety Network. 2016. Medication abuse prevention: 2016 resource guide. Waltham, MA: Children's Safety Network, 19 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes organizations, policy and legislation, prevention programs, publications, and webinars focused on prescription drug overdose prevention among youth and young adults. Contents include descriptions of reports, guides, toolkits, campaigns, website, iinitiatives, and research studies. Each item includes a short description and a link to the resource itself. Information about child safety and neonatal abstinence syndrome are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Drug effects, Infants, Legislation, Multimedia, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Policy development, Prescription drugs, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Safety, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse prevention programs, Young adults

Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities. 2016. WIthin our reach: A national strategy to eliminate child abuse and neglect fatalities. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 167 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents a vision for realigning organizations, communities, and priorities to identify and support children at highest risk of abuse or neglect fatality. Contents include recommendations for addressing the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native children and reducing child abuse and neglect deaths in disproportionately affected communities, improving leadership and accountability, grounding decisions in better data and research, and enhancing multidisciplinary support for families. A report fact sheet, social media toolkit, public meeting materials, deliberations, and resources on child abuse and neglect fatalities and National Child Abuse Prevention Month are also available.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Child abuse, Child death, Child neglect, Children, Decision making, Family centered care, Injury prevention, Leadership, Multidisciplinary approach, National initiatives, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Strategic plans, Systems development, Welfare reform

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

AcademyHealth. 2016. What evidence-based interventions for parents and families help mitigate adverse childhood experiences among children?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on the effectiveness of interventions that help to mitigate parental and familial factors that may contribute to adverse childhood experiences among children. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Topics include parent education programs (conducted outside the home), home visit programs, dual treatment programs for substance abuse, and trauma-informed care. The appendices contain definitions of terms; search terms and databases used in the review; and a table that describes the systematic reviews included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Evaluation methods, Evidence based medicine, Home visiting, Intervention, Low income groups, Medicaid, Parent education, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Substance abuse treatment, Trauma, Trauma care

AcademyHealth. 2016. Which adverse childhood experiences are most predictive of health care costs among adults?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) associated with higher health care costs among adults. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Collectively, the studies included in the review report costs for three of 10 major ACEs: physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. The appendices contain definitions of terms, search terms and databases used in the review, and a description of systematic reviews and relevant primary research studies included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Costs, Evaluation methods, Life course, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Trauma, Women

Oklahoma State Department of Health. 2015. Good health handbook: A guide for those caring for children (rev.). Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 542 pp.

Annotation: This handbook provides child care programs and schools with information on health, safety, and development issues. Topics include healthy living and health promotion including oral health promotion, policies and procedures, child development and guiding children's behavior, injury prevention and infection control, guidelines for childhood injuries, managing childhood illnesses and infestations, managing chronic medical conditions and special health care needs, and child abuse. Handouts, resources, and sample forms are included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 1000 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, Telephone: (405) 271-5600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 522-0203 Web Site: https://www.ok.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Child safety, Children, Consultation, Disease management, Health promotion, Infection control, Injuries, Injury prevention, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.