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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. n.d.. A family guide—20 easy steps to personal environmental health now. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides simple steps that families can take to make their environment healthier. Topics include label reading, noise, carbon monoxide alarms, child safety, job hazards, allergies, water pollution, lead, radon, overheating, ozone, handwashing, healthy eating, tobacco products, and sun exposure.

Contact: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-16, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2233, Telephone: (919) 541-3345 Fax: (919) 541-4395 E-mail: webcenter@niehs Web Site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Families, Lead poisoning, Radon, Safety, Sun exposure, Water pollution

National Center for Environmental Health. 2015. National report on human exposure to environmental chemicals. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Environmental Health, irregular.

Annotation: This report provides an ongoing assessment of the exposure of the U.S. population to environmental chemicals using biomonitoring for the civilian, non-institutionalized population. Data is provided for 148 chemicals, grouped into the following categories: metals, cotinine, several pesticides subcategories, phthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phytoestrogens, and herbicides. Additional topics include public health uses of the report and interpreting data. A separate executive summary is also available. Updated tables were published in 2015, and the fourth report in 2009. Previous editions are also available.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website. Document Number: NCEH Pub. No. 05-0570, NCEH Pub. No. 02-0716 .

Keywords: Chemicals, Data, Environmental exposure, National surveys, Research

National Library of Medicine. 2013–. Tox Town. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides an introduction to toxic chemicals and environmental health risks that individuals may encounter in everyday life and in everyday places. Users can use the neighborhoods page to learn about the location of chemicals and their related health risks. Additional contents include curriculum units and other resources that teachers can use to stimulate classroom learning about environmental-health-related issues and careers. The resource is available in English and Spanish. A text version is also available.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Curricula, Environmental health, Health occupations, Multimedia, Neighborhoods, Risk factors, Toxicology

Kirkendall N; Institute of Medicine, Committee on National Statistics. 2013. Design of the National Children's Study: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 94 pp.

Annotation: This summary reports on a January 2013 workshop on issues related to the overall design (including the framework for implementation) of the National Children's Study (NCS). The NCS is designed to study the environmental influences (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial) on children's health and development. Summary contents include environmental measures, consideration of multiple cohorts in the sample design, imputation and estimation, and moving forward. The workshop agenda, a list of participants, and information on the Committee on National Statistics are also included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-309-28840-8.

Keywords: Chemicals, Child health, Children, Environmental influences, Meetings, Physical development, Prospective studies, Psychosocial development, Research design

Axelrad D et al. 2013. America's children and the environment (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 494 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data on children's environmental health. Topics include (1) environments and contaminants such as air, indoor, drinking water, chemicals in food, contaminated lands, and climate change; (2) biomonitoring, such as lead, mercury, pcbs, and others; and (3) health concerns such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, neurodevelopomental disorders, obesity, and adverse birth outcomes. The report also covers birth defects and contaminants in schools and child care facilities. An appendix also describes the alignment of these indicators with Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

Etzel RA, Balk SJ,, eds. and American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Environmental Health. 2012. Pediatric environmental health (3rd ed.). [Elk Grove, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 934 pp.

Annotation: This book, designed to be used by practicing pediatricians, offers information on the role of the environment in the illnesses of childhood and adolescence. The book is organized into five sections. Section 1 offers background information including developmental toxicity, breastfeeding, how to take an environmental history, and how to do a home inventory of environmental hazards. Sections 2 and 3 focus on chemical and physical hazards and on specific environments such as child care settings, preconceptual and prenatal exposures, schools, waste sites, and workplaces. Section 4 addresses a variety of environmental situations including arts and crafts, asthma, cancer, chemical-biological terrorism, environmental disparities, multiple chemical sensitivities, antibiotics in animal agriculture, and environmental threats in developing countries. Section 5 provides information on communicating about environmental hazards. Boxes, figures, and tables present statistical and other information throughout the book. Also included are six appendices, including the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP's) policy statements and technical reports, resources for environmental health, curricula for environmental education in schools, chairs of the AAP committee on environmental health, AAP patient education materials, and more. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Document Number: ISBN 9781581106534.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Asthma, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Hazards, Pediatricians, Reference materials

Sachs N, McGarity TO, Steinzor R, Simpson A, Shudtz M. 2012. Protecting the public from BPA: An action plan for federal agencies. Washington, DC: Center for Progressive Reform, 33 pp. (White paper #1202)

Annotation: This white paper, which is intended to assist federal agencies in moving forward with Bisphenol-A(BPA) regulation and to provide the public with a more informative and safer consumer environment, outlines various short- and long-term regulatory options for protecting the public from health risks that BPA poses. The paper describes a two-prong approach, with the first phase focusing on immediate information collection and dissemination and the second including regulatory controls, standards, and protections to be promulgated as soon as missing information becomes available. The paper also discusses the current state of BPA, including known risks and regulatory safeguards; existing international, state, and local BPA controls, and regulatory efforts at the federal level.

Contact: Center for Progressive Reform, 455 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., #150-513, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 747-0698 E-mail: info@progressivereform.org Web Site: http://www.progressivereform.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Chemicals, Child health, Cognitive development, Diabetes, Endocrine diseases, Environmental exposure, Health, Infant health, Prevention, Public health, Reproductive health, Sexuality

Currie J, Schmieder JF. 2008. Fetal exposure to toxic releases and infant health. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 20 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14352)

Annotation: This paper estimates the effect of toxic chemicals on the health of newborns. These chemicals, when released into the air, are thought to be linked to developmental problems in fetuses and young children. The paper uses data from the Toxic Release Inventory Program and Vital Statistics Natality and Mortality files. The authors discuss background, data and methods, and results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Child health, Early childhood development, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Infant development, Infant health, Newborn infants

Board on Health Sciences Policy. 2008. Autism and the environment: Challenges and opportunities for research—Workshop proceedings. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 358 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings provide information from the workshop, Autism and the Environment: Challenges and Opportunities for Research. The workshop, conducted by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, was held on April 18-19, 2007. The focus was on improving the understanding of the ways in which environmental factors such as chemicals, infectious agents, or physiological or psychological stress can affect brain development. Topic include presentations, as well as a transcript of question-and-answer sessions following the presentations.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN-10 0-309-10881-0; ISBN-13 978-0-309-10881-2.

Keywords: Autism, Chemicals, Conference proceedings, Environmental influences, Nervous system diseases, Research, Stress

Allsopp M, Santillo D, Kallee U, Hojsik M. 2006. Our reproductive health and chemical exposure: A review of the evidence for links between declines in human reproductive health and our exposure to hazardous chemicals. Washington, DC: Greenpeace, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the consequences of a failure to date to control exposure to chemicals that are toxic to reproduction and implications of this failure for the future. The report reviews trends in reproductive health, along with evidence for contributions to those trends from exposures to hazardous chemicals in daily life. Information on the reproductive toxicity of these chemicals, as discerned from laboratory experiments, is also presented, as is available evidence on their widespread presence as contaminants in human tissues. An executive summary, a conclusion, and references are included.

Contact: Greenpeace, 702 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 462-1177 Secondary Telephone: (800) 326-0959 E-mail: info@wdc.greenpeace.org Web Site: http://www.greenpeace.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Environmental exposure, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental influences, Reproductive health, Trends

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2006. Early exposure to toxic substances damages brain architecture. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 16 pp. (Working paper no. 4)

Annotation: This paper discusses exposure to toxic substances in early childhood and how such exposure can disrupt the development of all the body's organ systems. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us and popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: , Brain, Chemicals, Early childhood development, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Illicit drugs, Lead, Prescription drugs, Programs, Public policy, Young children

Learning Disabilities Association of America, National Education Association, and Arc. [2005]. Mercury and learning disabilities: A parent's guide. [Pittsburgh, PA]: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 9 pp.

Annotation: This guide for parents discusses learning disabilities, how to prevent them, and how to reduce their children's risk of exposure to mercury, and thus, possibly, to reduce possible learning disabilites. The guide discusses the causes of learning disabilities, where mercury comes from, and how it affects children. The guide also includes advice for parents, guidelines for identifying learning disabilities, and information about how to test a child for learning disabilities.

Contact: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 4156 Library Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15234-1349, Telephone: (412) 341-1515 Fax: (412) 344-0224 E-mail: info@LDAAmerica.org Web Site: http://www.ldaamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Children, Consumer education materials, Environmental exposure, Environmental pollution, Learning disabilities, Prevention, Screening tests

Woodruff TJ, Axelrad DA, Kyle AD, Nweke O, Miller GC. 2003. America's children and the environment: Measures of contaminants, body burdens, and illnesses. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, 171 pp.

Annotation: This report brings together quantitative information on trends in levels of environmental contaminants; concentrations of contaminants measured in the bodies of children and women; and childhood illnesses that may be influenced by exposure to environmental contaminants. Report sections discuss environmental contaminants of outdoor and indoor air, drinking water, pesticides, and land contaminants; body burdens of concentrations of lead, mercury, and cotinine; and childhood illnesses such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Section four of the report discusses emerging issues such as mercury in fish and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Special features, part five of the report, focuses on lead in California schools, pesticides in Minnesota schools, and birth defects in California. Each section contains references. Also included is a section on future directions of measurements used in this report as well as a glossary of terms. The appendices include data tables, data and methods used, and environmental health objectives in Healthy People 2010 and in the Environmental Protection Agency's strategic plan.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, Room 2512 Ariel Rios North, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 1107-T, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 564-2188 Fax: (202) 564-2733 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website. Document Number: EPA 240-R-03-001.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

Lunder, S, Sharp R. 2003. Mothers' milk: Record levels of toxic fire retardants found in American mothers' breast milk. Washington, DC: Environmental Working Group, 65 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on a study that found that American women have unexpectedly large quantities of chemical fire retardants in their breast milk. The report explains the sources of fire retardants and why they have become so common, describes the study findings, explains the health risks of fire retardants, discusses the failure to protect children through commonsense safeguards, and offers recommendations. Three appendices include a description of the study methods and sample analysis, detailed study results, and information about study participants. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes a reference list.

Contact: Environmental Working Group, 1436 U Street, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 667-6982 Fax: (202) 232-2592 E-mail: info@ewg.org Web Site: http://ewg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Chemicals, Environmental exposure, Infants

Wargo J, Wargo LE. 2002. The state of children's health and environment 2002: Common sense solutions for parents and policymakers. [Princeton, NJ]: Children's Health Environmental Coalition, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses trends in children's health and their exposure to mixtures of synthetic chemicals in air, water, food, soil, and consumer products, and the lack of government monitoring or regulation. Chapter topics include asthma and air quality; birth defects, developmental disabilities, and neurotoxic chemicals; childhood cancer and the environment; principles for legal reform; and a guide for parents and others. Numerous charts, tables, and graphs present statistical data on child health and environmental quality measures.

Contact: Healthy Child Healthy World, 12300 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 320, Los Angeles, CA 90025, Telephone: (310) 820-2030 Fax: (310) 820-2070 Web Site: http://www.healthychild.org $18.00, including shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Cancer, Chemicals, Child development disorders, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Government role, Regulation, Statistics

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.