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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative. 2013. States' use of cost-benefit analysis: Improving results for taxpayers. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report explains what cost-benefit analysis is and why it is important and examines the findings of a study conducted to measure states' use of cost-benefit analysis to compare the cost of public programs to the returns they deliver, documents the contributions that cost-benefit analyses provide to effective state policymaking, and identifies barriers states face in using these results and strategies to overcome those barriers. The report also provides rankings of states in their production, scope, and use of cost-benefit analysis to support data-driven policymaking. The report is intended to serve as a resource for policy leaders seeking to expand their use of cost-benefit analysis and as a baseline for future studies of states' progress in using rigorous evidence to better inform difficult budget choices.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Costs, Program evaluation, Public policy, Research, State programs, Statistical data

Zero To Three. [2012]. Babies and the budget: Opportunities for action. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This advocacy tool describes how the federal budget process works, why it's important, and how to become involved in the process. Based on a model developed by the Center for Community Change, the tool provides a timeline of events that typically take place during the federal budget process and opportunities for action during each stage. The tool also provides links to video messages about the federal budget process and a glossary of policy and advocacy terms.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Budgeting, Budgets, Child advocacy, Federal government, Policy

First Focus. 2012. Children's budget 20__. Washington, DC: First Focus, annual.

Annotation: This guide, begun in 2008, highlights federally-funded programs for children and the levels at which they are funded. It includes information on more than 180 programs aimed at enhancing the well-being of children in the United States. The information is organized according to the following broad categories: education, health, housing, safety, nutrition, training, income support, child welfare, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Program descriptions, current appropriation levels, funding levels from the past five fiscal years, and proposed funding levels for the coming fiscal year are included.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Child health, Children, Data, Federal programs, Funding, Statistics

Zero To Three. 2012. What's in the budget for babies?: Analysis of the President's 2013 budget proposal. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This analysis examines the federal 2013 budget from the perspective of support for the healthy development of infants and toddlers. It discusses programs that support children's health and nutrition, programs that focus on strong family support, and positive early learning experiences. A comparison of federal program funding describes dollar-for-dollar differences in current and projected funding for nutrition, child welfare, education, justice programs, health and mental health programs, and family support programs.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Child development, Child health programs, Cost effectiveness, Federal programs, Funding, Infants, Toddlers, Young children

Planning Council for Health and Human Services, and Wisconsin Partnership Program, Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families. 2012. Milwaukee Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families community action plan. Milwaukee, WI: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 208 pp.

Annotation: This community action plan focuses on the efforts of the Milwaukee Lifecourse Initiative to reduce infant mortality among blacks in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The action plan discusses background, provides a community description, and discusses the initiative and its efforts. Other topics include addressing socioeconomic conditions and stress, milestones and an evaluation plan, budget and resources, and a sustainability plan.

Keywords: Blacks, Budgets, Communities, Economic factors, High risk groups, Infant mortality, Initiatives, Prevention, Program evaluation, Racial factors, State programs, Stress, Trends, Wisconsin

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2011. Critical condition: How federal and state budget cuts are hurting the health of our nation's mothers and children. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report shows how budget cuts, combined with the increase in the number of Americans living in poverty and those without health insurance is endangering the health of the nation’s mothers, infants and children, including those with special health care needs. It provides a snapshot of the impact federal and state budget cuts have had on maternal and child health (MCH) in a number of selected states and illustrates why Congress needs to maintain funding to state MCH programs. An overview of the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant is included in the report.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analysis, Budgets, Child health, Children with special health needs, Costs, Federal programs, MCH programs, Maternal health, Risk factors, State MCH programs, Title V programs

New Mexico Children's Cabinet. 2010-. 20__ report card and budget report. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Children's Cabinet, annual.

Annotation: This report describes the activities of New Mexico benefitting the children and youth of the state. It includes socioeconomic data on children and youth and their families; a brief review of budget allocations for state programs and services; health statistics, such as adolescent pregnancy rates and immunizations; state education data; and safety, including injury and suicide prevention. Additional budget and tax details are provided.

Contact: New Mexico Early Childhood Action Network, NM E-mail: ecan.nm@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.earlychildhoodnm.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Budgets, Child health, Children, Immunization, New Mexico, Safety, State programs, Statistical data

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Adolescent Health Program. 2010. Nebraska State Abstinence Education Grant Program: State plan FY 2010. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 32 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This state plan describes the activities of Nebraska's State Abstinence Education Grant Program for 2010. The document discusses the problem and need associated with Nebraska adolescents and presents an implementation plan. Topics discussed in relation to the implementation plan include existing programs and gaps in services, challenges and barriers, mechanisms for implementation, monitoring, coordination, service recipient involvement, referrals, objective performance and efficiency measures, programmatic assurances, and budget.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Budgets, Education, High risk adolescents, High risk groups, Nebraska, Poverty, Program coordination, Referral, Service delivery, State grants, State programs

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2008. Highlights of a forum: Ensuring opportunities for disadvantaged children and families. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 45 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes discussions held on June 25, 2008, concerning the role of government in assisting low-income families, income supports and low-income families, early care and education for low-income children, education for disadvantaged children, health care and low-income children and families, and the long-term fiscal challenges faced by the federal government in providing assistance to disadvantaged children and families. Appendices include two presentations addressing the role of federal spending on children and families to ensure the nation's future, and the changing roles of children in an aging society.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Education, Federal agencies, Federal government, Financial support, Low income groups, Public policy

Edelstein S, Hahn H, Isaacs J, Steele E, Steuerle CE. 2007–. Kids' share. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, annual.

Annotation: This annual report examines federal expenditures on children. It provides analysis of federal programs and tax provisions that allocate resources to children and places these expenditures in the broader context of the overall federal budget. Topics include current expenditures, historical trends, and future projections. While the primary focus is federal expenditures, the report also provides information about state and local spending on children. A companion volume, Data Appendix to Kids' Share, provides the sources of expenditure data, and the methodologies for estimating the portions of programs that go specifically to children, for each program.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Child development, Child health, Child nutrition, Child safety, Costs, Education, Federal programs, Taxes, Trends

Biobank Feasibility Expert Panel. 2007. Feasibility study for a statewide biobank to study preterm births and birth defects: A report to the Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes 4 discussions held by a 21 member panel during 2007 concerning the feasibility of a biobank in Connecticut and the value it might add to the study of preterm births and birth defects. Biobank models; funding sources; possible increases in research potential; affordability, ethical, legal, and social issues; and the likely public and private perceptions of such a bank all receive examination. Findings and recommendations conclude the report.

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 410 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-8000 E-mail: webmaster.dph@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Bioethics, Budgets, Congenital abnormalities, Connecticut, Genetic markers, Genetics, Low birthweight, Prenatal screening, Preterm birth, State programs

Johnson K. 2006. Developing fiscal analyses and children's budgets to support ECCS. New York, NY: Project Thrive, National Center for Children in Poverty, 8 pp. (Short take no. 3)

Annotation: This report offers approaches, tools, and tables for developing fiscal analyses and children's budgets to support early childhood comprehensive systems initiatives. The report, which builds on program-by-program background information from the National Center for Children in Poverty report, Spending Smarter, as well as on information from a recent report published by the Forum for Youth Investment and the Finance Project. The present report also highlights state and local experience in fiscal analysis. The report discusses why fiscal analysis and children's budgets are important and provides several approaches to developing budgets. Some of the information is presented in figures and tables. Endnotes and a list of resources are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Low income groups, Poverty, Programs, Public policy, Service delivery systems, Young children

Georgetown University Health Policy Institute. 2005. The President's proposals for Medicaid and SCHIP: How would they affect children's health care coverage? (Rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, 7 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the president's budget proposal for fiscal year 2006, which would reduce overall federal funding for Medicaid by at least $45 billion over 10 years. The brief also anticipates policy changes that could have a major impact on children's health coverage. The brief discusses federal funding reductions and the policy proposals and offers recommendations. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the brief.

Contact: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-0880 Fax: (202) 687-3110 Web Site: http://ihcrp.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Budgets, Child health, Financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, State Children's Health Insurance Program

Hill I, Courtot B, Sullivan J. 2005. Ebbing and flowing: Some gains, some losses as SCHIP responds to third year of budget pressure. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 11 pp. (Assessing the new federalism; Series A, No. A-68)

Annotation: This report focuses on how the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) is responding to budget pressures. The report discusses how SCHIP programs changed in various states in 2004 in terms of eligibility, enrollment procedures, outreach, benefits, cost sharing, provider reimbursement, and crowd out. The report also discusses SCHIP in TANF states vs. the nation and provides conclusions and an outlook. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Endnotes and references are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Cost sharing, Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Outreach, Reimbursement, State Children's Health Insurance Program

Foster S, Rollefson M, Doksum T, Noonan D, Robinson G, Teich J. 2005. School mental health services in the United States 2002-2003. Washington, DC: U.S. Center for Mental Health Services, ca. 160 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that provides a baseline regarding traditional mental health services delivered in schools to students who have been referred and identified as having psychosocial or mental health problems. The report, which includes an executive summary, discusses the background and study methods; mental health problems and services in the school setting; administrative arrangements for the delivery and coordination of mental health services in schools; staff providing mental health services in schools; funding, budgeting and resource allocation, and data use; and mental health problems and services at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. A discussion and implications for future research are included, along with endnotes, references, and three appendices: (1) a list of expert panel members, (2) a summary of open-ended survey responses, and (3) supplemental tables.

Contact: SAMHSA's National Mental Health Information Center, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, P.O. Box 42557, Washington, DC 20015, Telephone: (800) 789-2647 Secondary Telephone: (866) 889-2647 Fax: (240) 221-4295 E-mail: info@mentalhealth.org Web Site: http://store.samhsa.gov/home Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: SMA05-4068.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Budgets, Child mental health, Costs, Elementary schools, Financing, Health services delivery, High schools, Mental disorders, Middle schools, School health services, Service coordination, Statistics

Bruner C, Elias V, Stein D, Schaefer S. 2004. Early learning left out: An examination of public investments in education and development by child age. Washington, DC: Voices for America's Children; Des Moines, IA: Child and Family Policy Center, 34 pp.

Annotation: This study presents a study of public investments in child education and development by three age groupings: the early learning years (birth through age 5), the school-aged years (ages 6-18), and the college-age years (ages 19-23). The study is based upon a detailed analysis of state, federal, and school district spending in 12 states across the country, conducted by organizations in those states with strong understanding of early childhood services and state budgeting. The study is designed to give policymakers and the public a better understanding of overall public investments in child education and development and the research on potential returns on investment from early learning programs. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the study. In addition to the main body, the study includes an executive summary, two appendices that contain 12-state data and individual state data, and endnotes.

Contact: Voices for America's Children, 1000 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-0777 Secondary Telephone: (866) 435-2970 Fax: (202) 289-0776 E-mail: voices@voices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Budgets, Child development, College students, Early childhood development, Financing, Public policy, School age children, School districts

Fox HB, Limb SJ. 2004. SCHIP programs more likely to increase children's cost sharing than reduce their eligibility or benefits to control costs. Washington, DC: Maternal and Child Health Policy Center, 6 pp. (Child health program impact series, fact sheet no. 4)

Annotation: This report describes a study about the impact of state budget problems on the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). SCHIP directors in the 50 jurisdictions operating SCHIPs in March 2004 were asked about policy changes made in 2003 or the first quarter of 2004 in the areas of eligibility, enrollment, benefits, and cost sharing. Contents include the following sections: controls on SCHIP eligibility and enrollment, changes in benefits, increases in cost-sharing requirements, future of the program, and conclusions. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Budgets, Cost sharing, Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Health care financing, Oral health, State children's health insurance program, Surveys

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2004. Strategic plan FY 2004-2009. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 193 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic outcome goals and objectives for investment in accomplishing the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) mission to protect and improve the health and well-being of the American public for fiscal years 2004-2009. Goals include (1) reduce the major threats to the health and well-being of Americans; (2) enhance the ability of the nation's health care system to effectively respond to bioterrorism and other public health challenges; (3) increase the percentage of the nation's children and adults to have access to health care services, and expand consumer choices; (4) enhance the capacity and productivity of the nation's health science research enterprise; (5) improve the quality of health care services; (6) improve the economic and social well-being of individuals, families, and communities, especially those most in need; (7) improve the stability and healthy development of our nation's children and youth; and (8) achieve excellence in management practices. The introduction provides background information on the Department of Health and Human Services, the development of this plan, and a description of the mission, vision, goals, and core values of the department. The goals section provides detail on the strategies for accomplishing goals and objectives. The appendices include performance plan linage and success indicators, coordination elements, external factors, data challenges and responses, program evaluations, resources supporting the plan, a schedule for initiating actions, management tools used in support of program goals, the department's organization, and a matrix of programs that support HHS strategic objectives.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal agencies, Federal programs, Health objectives, National programs, Public health services, Strategic plans

Fox HB, Limb SJ, Levtov RG, McManus MA. 2004. Children not the target of major Medicaid cuts but still affected by states' financial decisions. Washington, DC: Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, 8 pp. (Child health impact series fact sheet; no. 5)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides new information on the extent of state Medicaid policy changes affecting children in states' fiscal years 2003 and 2004. Areas examined include eligibility, managed care enrollment, benefits, authorization, cost sharing, fee-for-service provider payments, and home- and community-based waivers. Conclusions and future directions are included along with endnotes. A chart outlines individual states' Medicaid cost-cutting measures affecting children in six areas.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, 750 17th Street, N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20006-4607, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 496-9067 Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Child health services, Costs, Enrollment, Health care financing, Managed care, Medicaid, State initiatives

Williams C, Rosen, Hudman J, O'Malley M. 2004. Challenges and tradeoffs in low-income family budgets: Implications for health coverage. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured , 41 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the experiences of families trying to make ends meet on limited budgets. By discussing these families' work, spending patterns, financial challenges, priorities, tradeoffs, health care, and health coverage, the report intends to provide a deeper understanding of families' financial pressures, their choices, and the information needed to assess the impact of current and proposed policies. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following sections: (1) methodology, (2) main themes, and (3) family profiles. The main themes include work, financial problems and debts, priorities and tradeoffs, health care and coverage, getting and giving help, hopes for the future, and conclusions and policy implications. The family profiles are based on in-depth interviews with families with incomes below 250% of the federal poverty level in Baltimore, Des Moines, and Oakland. The appendix gives a family budget questionnaire.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Families, Health care, Health insurance, Low income groups, Poverty, Public policy, Uninsured persons, WIC Program

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.