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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 11 (11 total).

Sherman B. n.d.. Home-Based Support Services for Chronically Ill Children and Their Families [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to demonstrate that a system of reimbursable, cost-effective, home-based support services can be implemented for families with chronically ill children. The project objectives were to facilitate the provision of home-based care for chronically ill children through the following activities: (1) Developing a regional network of medically skilled respite providers; (2) establishing self-help mutual support groups for chronically ill children and their parents and siblings; (3) training professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and (4) disseminating project findings and recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158699.

Keywords: Arthritis, Asthma, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Congenital Heart Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Feeding Disorders, Hemophilia, Home-Based Health Care, Kidney Disease, Leukemia, Low income groups, Muscular Dystrophy, Nurses, Respiratory Technologies, Respite Care, Sick Kids (Need) Involved People (SKIP), Sickle Cell Disease, Support Groups, Tay-Sachs Disease, Ventilator Dependence

Branca P. n.d.. The Care of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia In a System Encompassing Tertiary, Rehabilitative and Home Care [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 13 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was the development of a multilevel model of care for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia that was cost effective, decreased length of hospital stays, and allowed for a physically, emotionally, socially, and developmentally healthier child. Inservice training for staff and parenting workshops were conducted as part of this project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161966.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Children with special health care needs, Coordination of services, Infants, Length of stay, Ventilator dependent

Singer LT. [2008]. Psycho-social sequelae of BPD and VLBW: Phase (3) Three—[Final report]. Cleveland, Oh: Case Western Reserve University, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to investigate the early adolescent outcomes associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the leading chronic pulmonary disease of prematurity, with a particular focus on the influence of BPD relative to other medical, neurologic, and sociodemographic risk factors, on pulmonary, cognitive, language, neuropsychological, and behavioral outcomes. It also describes an investigation on family stressors associated with BPD and very low birthweight (VLBW). Contents include an introduction describing the research problem; purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation; a review of the literature; study design and methods; and a discussion and interpretation of findings. A list of references cited is included as well as a list of products produced during the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Family health, Final reports, MCH research, Premature infant diseases, Prematurity, Very low birth weight

Singer L. 2003. Psychosocial sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and very low birthweight: Phase 2—Final report. Cleveland, OH: Case Western Reserve University, Department of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a study focusing on the long-term developmental and family sequelae outcomes of very low birth weight children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). It addresses whether infants with BPD would exhibit more developmental problems, using standard measures of growth, intellect, motor, and language development; whether parents would show higher degrees of depressive symptoms and stress; and whether infants would show more deviant and maladaptive feeding behavior. Report sections include the nature, purpose, scope, and methods of the research problem; a review of the literature; an outline of the study design and methods; a presentation of findings; and a discussion of findings and recommendations for policy implications and further research. Also provided are a list of products developed and references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Family relations, Feeding disorders, Final reports, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Prematurity

Watterberg KL. 2000. Early cortisol replacement to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Pilot study. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 4 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 31)

Annotation: This document announces the Research Roundtable describing research in a pilot study on early cortisol replacement to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. The findings will be presented at a Research Roundtable sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The Web site offers print materials including an overview of the study, presenter contact information, an HTML version of the Reactor's remarks and a list of resources and references. The audiovisual portion of the program includes slideshows, Powerpoint presentations, a quicktime version of the reactor's presentation, and an audio recording of the session. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Infants, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Premature infant diseases, Premature infants

Watterberg K. 1999. Early Cortisol Replacement to Prevent BPD: Pilot Study: [Final report]. Hershey, PA: Pennsylvania State Universtiy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This pilot study was designed to estimate the benefits and safety of supplementation with physiologic doses of hydrocortisone during the first 12 days of life to decrease the incidence of subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is a chronic lung disease following neonatal lung injury, which affects a majority of extremely low birthweight babies and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. The results of this pilot study were tested to calculate an appropriate sample size for a future multicenter trial. The secondary hypotheses was that this therapy will improve physiologic stability during the treatment period. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106931.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, MCH Research, Neonatal Mortality, Newborn infants, Research

Singer L. 1998. Psychological Sequelae of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Very Low Birthweight: [Final report]. Cleveland, OH: Case Western Reserve University, 32 pp.

Annotation: This study was a longitudinal, prospective investigation of the medical, social, and developmental correlates of chronic lung disease during the first 2 years of life. Data was evaluated descriptively as well as through a series of multivariate analyses of variance with repeated measures to describe the functioning of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and to understand the developmental interferences imposed by BPD early in life. The research provided practical information about family and developmental stresses related to lung disease that might be amenable to intervention early in life and also contribute to our theoretical understanding of the role of chronic illness in child development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-109373.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Early Childhood Development, Infant Morbidity, Low Birthweight, MCH Research, Pulmonary Disease, Research

Singer L. 1995. Psychosocial sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and very low birthweight. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 6 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 9)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar June 27, 1995. The study focuses on the developmental and family sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and the medical and social complications of prematurity and very low birthweight. It addresses whether infants with BPD would exhibit more developmental problems, using standard measures of growth, intellect, motor, and language development; whether parents would show higher degrees of depressive symptoms and stress; and whether infants would show more deviant and maladaptive feeding behavior. The report ends with reaction to the project and a list of publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Developmental disabilities, Families, Feeding disorders, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Prematurity

Watterberg KL. 1995. Early cortisol deficiency and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 8 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 10)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar October 18, 1995. This project focuses on cortisol production in low birthweight premature infants and the relationship of cortisol concentrations and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The report ends with reaction to the project and a list of publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge: also available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Evaluation methods, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Premature infants

Watterberg K. 1995. Early Cortisol Deficiency and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia [Final report]. Hershey, PA: Pennsylvania State University, 39 pp.

Annotation: The objectives of this project were to measure cortisol concentrations, both basal and stimulated, in very low birthweight infants in the first week of life, and to test the hypothesis that inappropriately low basal values and blunted responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation during that period are associated with increased lung inflammation and development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The study design addressed the question of whether a subgroup of very low birthweight babies had a stress nonresponsive period and therefore developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or whether all very low birthweight infants had a stress nonresponsive period, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia occurs in a subgroup of this population with a more intense inflammatory stimulus and/or response. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-187299.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Low Birthweight, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Research

Perrin J. 1993. Coordinated care and case management for children with special health needs [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts General Hospital, 49 pp.

Annotation: This study was designed to examine families' perceptions of the processes and results of care coordination provided by Title V programs. Although no significant differences in hospital, physician, emergency room, or other health care utilization by provision or type of care coordination were expected, it was hypothesized that certain types or availability of care coordination would diminish perceived unmet needs and would be associated with improved psychological functioning of children and parents and increased satisfaction with health services in general. Analysis of survey responses, received from 562 families with children with special health care needs in 6 States, revealed major differences in the types of services that families perceived they obtained from care coordinators. Family perceptions of whether or not they received case management services appeared to vary substantially from those of the relevant agencies and many families reported receiving case management services from other agencies in addition to the Title V agency. Little or no association was found between the presence, absence, or type of care coordination and such outcome variables as utilization of services, maternal mental health, child functioning, or satisfaction. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-218641.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Case Management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Families, Spina Bifida

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.