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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (46 total).

Chicago Area Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Breastfeeding peer counselor: Train the trainer. Springfield, IL: Chicago Area Healthy Start Project, 242 pp.

Annotation: This is a training guide for peer counselors who train mothers in breastfeeding techniques. It is part of the Healthy Start Program in the Chicago area. Topics in the training guide include the following: 1) getting acquainted, 2) the art of counseling, 3) the role of the peer counselor, 4) how to start breastfeeding, 5) preventing and managing problems, 6) nutrition, and 7) infant health. Each session in the guide contains an outline; exercises; and handouts, forms, or both. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Chicago Healthy Start, 535 West Jefferson Street, First Floor, Springfield, IL 62761, Telephone: (312) 793-4662 Contact Phone: (217) 782-4890 Fax: (217) 782-4890 Price unknown.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Curricula, Infant feeding, Infant health, Lactation management, Training materials

New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. n.d.. Making it work toolkit. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, multiple items.

Annotation: These toolkits for consumers and employers provide information to address the challenges of low income wage earners returning to work while continuing to breastfeed. Contents include five individual toolkits. A toolkit for mothers provides information on how to talk with supervisors, coworkers, and child care providers and how to store and handle breast milk, as well as checklists, tips, sample schedules, and food ideas. A toolkit for family members explains the role grandparents and partners play while dispelling myths that can be held by others, and how to give support and care for a breastfed infant. Additional toolkits are designed to help employers comply with state and federal laws; offer guidance for mothers and employers on interpreting the laws and resources; and provide sample letters and policies.

Contact: New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, Telephone: (866) 881-2809 E-mail: dohweb@health.state.ny.us Web Site: http://www.health.ny.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Employer initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, New York, State programs, Supported employment, Workplace health promotion

Pickett OK, Wilhite BC. 2017. Breastfeeding: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief describes national and international websites, lists recent publications for consumers and health professionals, and links to breastfeeding organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding care, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Consumer education materials, Infant feeding, Resources for professionals

Association of State Public Health Nutritionists Maternal and Child Health Council. 2014. MCH nutrition success stories. Johnstown, PA: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, 5 items.

Annotation: This resource focuses on state agency efforts to promote good nutrition in the maternal and child health population. Contents include information about projects to train home visit staff to be lactation consultants in New Hampshire, a shared meals initiative in Oregon, developing and implementing an early care and education nutrition and physical activity strategic plan in Kentucky, increasing nutrition counseling skills in New Hampshire, and supporting systems and environmental change programs in California. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Child health, Collaboration, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Nutrition, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public health nutritionists, State MCH programs, Strategic planning, Systems development, Training

United States Breastfeeding Committee, National Breastfeeding Center. 2014. Model policy: Payer coverage of breastfeeding support and counseling services, pumps and supplies (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, National Breastfeeding Center, 28 pp.

National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality . 2013. Becoming baby-friendly: Improving breastfeeding support in US hospitals. [Boston, MA]: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality, 1 video (16 min., 47 sec.).

Annotation: This video presents the stories of four hospitals as they journey toward Baby-Friendly status. The video was produced as part of the Best Fed Beginnings quality-improvement project, a nationwide effort to help hospitals improve maternity care and increase the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the United States. The video features the Barnes-Jewish Hospital's (Missouri) work on patient-centered care, the Presbyterian Hospital's (New Mexico) efforts to increase skin-to-skin contact, the Christiana Hospital's (Delaware) focus on staff buy-in, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital's efforts to catalyze the community by changing misconceptions about breastfeeding.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communities, Hospital programs, Infant health, Newborn infants, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Women's health

Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institue. 2013. Improving hospital breastfeeding support: Implementation toolkit. Oakland, CA: Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institue, 103 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which contains information about breastfeeding promotion in the inpatient setting, is designed to assist health care organizations and hospital teams in planning and implementing performance-improvement projects. The toolkit is organized around five primary components of performance improvement in hospital-based breastfeeding support: leadership engagement, planning and ongoing improvement, measurement strategy, keeping patients at the center, and sustainability. The toolkit provides information on evidence for breastfeeding benefits, Kaiser Parmanente's journey, building for successful change, and innovative ideas for breastfeeding support and promotion.

Contact: Kaiser Permanente Case Management Institute, 1 Kaiser Plaza, 16L, Oakland, CA 94612, E-mail: cmi.communications@kp.org Web Site: http://kpcmi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Hospital programs, Infant health, Leadership, Program improvement, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Strategies to prevent obesity and other chronic diseases: The CDC guide to strategies to support breastfeeding mothers and babies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose the breastfeeding intervention strategy that best meets needs, including hospitals and birth centers, worksites, and communities. This guide builds upon the research evidence demonstrating effective intervention strategies and offers relevant information for each including program examples and resources. Contents include maternity care practices, professional education, access to professional support, peer support programs, support for breastfeeding in the workplace and in early care and education, access to breastfeeding education and information, social marketing, and addressing the marketing of infant formula.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Intervention, Lactation, Lactation management, MCH programs, Professional education, Resources for professionals

Texas Breastfeeding Collaborative. 2013. Improving breastfeeding support through milk banks. Boston, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality , 1 video (4 min., 4 sec.).

Annotation: This video provides a tour of the Mother's Milk Bank of North Texas. The video explores how the milk bank works, explains why breastfeeding is important for mothers and infants, and discusses why donation milk is important for helping families to support breastfeeding. The video describes the screening and approval process for donors and explains how milk is tested, stored, mixed, bottled, pasteurized, and released to hospitals for use—primarily in neonatal intensive care units.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Community programs, Hospitals, Infant health, Mothers, Multimedia, Neonatal intensive care units, State programs, Texas, Videos, Women's health

Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee. 2013. Curriculum for a lactation program. Morrisville, NC: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 32 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum presents competencies and objectives to guide any lactation program, regardless of setting. Topics include communication and counseling; documentation and communication; history taking and assessment; prenatal and perinatal breastfeeding support; extended breastfeeding support; problem-solving skills; newborn/child breastfeeding challenges; maternal breastfeeding challenges' use of techniques and devices; public health; research, legislation, and policy; professional responsibilities and practice; and leadership and teaching. For each topic, information is provided about core competencies, learning objectives, suggested content, and suggested skills and behaviors. [Record in process]

Contact: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 2501 Aerial Center Parkway, Suite 103, Morrisville, NC 27560, Telephone: (919) 459-6106 E-mail: info@leaarc.org Web Site: http://www.leaarc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Breastfeeding support, Lactation, Leadership, Legislation, Parent support services, Public health, Public policy, Research, Standards

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Worksite wellness in state health agencies: Implementation of healthy maternity policies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 1 video (59 min., 41 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar highlights successful strategies and best practices that have been implemented in Nevada and North Dakota state health agencies to encourage breastfeeding and to help new parents return to work. In addition, the Virginia breastfeeding coordinator describes how the Virginia Department of Health has worked with businesses to develop breastfeeding policies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Model programs, State initiatives, Workplace

United Methodist Health Ministry Fund. 2012-. High 5 for mom and baby. Hutchinson, KS: United Methodist Health Ministry Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information on the importance of breastfeeding and the role of hospitals in breastfeeding success. It describes a program to encourage adoption of five evidence based maternity care practices that have been found to increase breastfeeding rates. Contents include current breastfeeding rates in Kansas, participating hospitals, endorsements, a hospital application agreement and form, and program logos and branding materials.

Contact: United Methodist Health Ministry Fund, P.O. Box 1384, 100 East First, Hutchinson, KS 67504-1384, Telephone: (800) 369-7191 Secondary Telephone: (316) 662-8586 E-mail: healthfund@healthfund.org Web Site: http://www.healthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Evidence based medicine, Health promotion, Hospital accreditation, Infant health, Kansas, Maternal health, Model programs, State programs

Meek JY. 2012. Breastfeeding support and promotion [speaker's kit] (rev.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Breastfeeding,

Annotation: This kit is designed for educating pediatricians, physicians; public health workers; nurses; hospital, clinic, or private practice staff; dentists; and others on the topic of breastfeeding support and promotion. The content is presented in five sections, each of which contains presentation slides and notes. Topics include the benefits, process, management, and advocacy of breastfeeding.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Contact E-mail: lactation@aap.org Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Health reform: What is in it to promote breastfeeding?. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines breastfeeding provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and discusses how maternal and child health programs can use the ACA to strengthen breastfeeding efforts for women. Topics include breastfeeding support, counseling, and equipment, as well as reasonable break time and appropriate space in the workplace. Sources and selected resources for further information are provided.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Health care reform, Legislation, State MCH programs, Women, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Fitzgerald EL. 2012. A quality improvement initiative to develop and implement an infant feeding strategy for Healthy Start. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Dissertation Publishing, 158 pp.

Annotation: This dissertation describes a project to improve perinatal case manager knowledge and self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding among black women participating in Healthy Start, a national program to improve birth outcomes, using quality improvement methods. The dissertation describes the development of the training program and an infant feeding toolkit and the evaluation of the learning by the case managers who used the training program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding promotion, Healthy Start, Infant nutrition, Local programs, Massachusetts, Mothers, Training programs

Baby-Friendly USA. (2011). The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Guidelines and evaluation criteria for facilities seeking baby-friendly designation. [Upd ed.]. Sandwich, MA: Baby-Friendly USA, 31 pp.

Annotation: This document presents guidelines and evaluation criteria for hospitals and birthing centers seeking Baby-Friendly designation. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a global program to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for breastfeeding. Guidelines address the following steps: (1) having a written breastfeeding policy, (2) training staff to implement the policy, (3) informing pregnant women about the benefits and management of breastfeeding, (4) helping mothers initiate breastfeeding within 1 hour of birth, (5) showing mothers how to breastfeed and how to maintain lactation, (6) giving infants breast milk only unless medically indicated, (7) practicing rooming in, (8) encouraging breastfeeding on demand, (9) giving no pacifiers or artificial nipples to breastfeeding infants, and (10) fostering the establishment of breastfeeding support groups and referring mothers to them after discharge.

Contact: U.S. Committee for UNICEF, U.S. Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, 125 Wolf Road, Suite 311, Albany, MNY 12205, Telephone: (518) 621-7982 Fax: (518) 621-7983 E-mail: info@babyfriendlyusa.org Web Site: http://www.babyfriendlyusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Birthing centers, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communities, Evaluation, Guidelines, Hospital programs, Infant health, Newborn infants, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Support groups, Women's health

Florida Department of Health, Florida WIC. 2011. Florida WIC supports breastfeeding. [Tallahassee, FL]: Florida Department of Health, Florida WIC, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the Florida WIC Program's support of breastfeeding. Information is presented about the increased percentage of Florida WIC participants who start out breastfeeding, compared with participation rates in 1990; physician support of breasteeding; breastfeeding resources, and breastfeeding research.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of WIC and Nutrition Services, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin A13, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1721, Telephone: (850) 488-0595 Fax: (850) 487-9626 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Family/wic/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: , Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Health promotion, Infant health, Non English language materials, Research, Spanish language materials, WIC

Whitacre PT, Moats S; Institute of Medicine. 2011. Updating the USDA National Breastfeeding Campaign: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 114 pp.

Annotation: This document presents presentations and discussions from a workshop held to provide input on how to effectively build on the successes of the national breastfeeding support and promotion campaign, Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work, launched in 1997. The workshop focused on using an evidence-based social marketing strategiy to make the campaign relevant and effective. The document summarizes opening remarks from the president of the National WIC Association; discusses changes over the past 15 years; describes lessons learned from other public health campaigns; and discusses suggestions for moving the social marketing campaign forward, including program components and messages, communication tools, implementation tools for state WIC programs, strategic community-based partnerships, identification of research gaps, and evaluation of program success.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-21919-8.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communication, Community programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Research, WIC Program

Fahey C, Frazier B, Buenaflor C, Haydu S, Shields L, Saraiva C, Panchula J. 2011. Birth and Beyond California: Hospital Breastfeeding Quality Improvement and Staff Training Demonstration Project Report. [Sacramento, CA]: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Birth and Beyond California: Hospital Breastfeeding Quality Improvement and Staff Training Project (BBC), a demonstration project initiated by the Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division, California Department of Public Health. BBC was designed to increase exclusive in-hospital breastfeeding rates (i.e., feeding infants only human milk). The report discusses project development, evaluation findings, and lessons learned.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, California, Evaluation, Health promotion. Prevention, Hospitals, Infant health, Perinatal health, Public policy, State programs, Women's health

Boccanfuso C, Moore KA, Whitney C. 2010. Ten ways to promote educational achievement and attainment beyond the classroom. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 13 pp.

Annotation: This research brief brings together findings from a variety of research resources to identify 10 actionable, feasible goals involving non-school factors that affect educational outcomes and can be addressed through out-of-school-time programs. The goals include (1) reduce unintended pregnancies, (2) improve prenatal and postnatal maternal health, (3) improve parenting practices among parents of infants and young children, (4) improve young children's nutrition and encourage mothers to breastfeed, (5) enhance the quality and availability of educational child care, preschool, pre-kindergarten, and full-day kindergarten, (6) connect children and adolescents with long-term mentors, (7) improve parenting practices among parents of school-age children and adolescents, (8) provide family and couples counseling to improve family functioning, (9) provide high-quality educational after-school and summer programs, and (10) develop positive social skills and reduce delinquency among adolescents. The brief describes research findings related to each goal and types of programs that effectively address each goal.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Breastfeeding promotion, Child care, Children, Early childhood education, Educational attainment, Families, Family support services, Infants, Nutrition, Parenting skills, Prenatal care, Prevention, Programs, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.